Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very simple js function to toggle div visibility, here's the working version:

function Toggle(obj) {   
    var state = document.getElementById(obj);
    if (state.style.display === 'block') {
        state.style.display = 'none';
    }
    else {
        state.style.display = 'block';
    }
}

Here obj represents the id of a div. Now, I have multiple divs on page, and want when user opens a new div, to have previously opened div closed. I tried to do it by modifying my function like this:

var prev_obj = 'empty';

 function Toggle(obj) {  
    var state = document.getElementById(obj);
    if (state.style.display === 'block') {
        state.style.display = 'none';
    }
    else {

                if (prev_obj !== 'empty')
                {
        var prev_state = document.getElementById(prev_obj)
        prev_state.style.display = 'none';
                }       
        state.style.display = 'block';

                prev_obj = obj;
    }
}

I guess this is self explanatory to js wizards out there, so I'll just say, when I hard-code the value for prev_obj, it works, but when I don't it doesn't, and firebug shows that it's keeping the initial value ("empty")

Help appreciated as well as any other way to do this if you have it.

share|improve this question
    
Can jQuery be used for the solution? –  Thomas Langston Dec 14 '10 at 22:54
    
This code should work... are you sure that prev_obj is being declared global? For a quick test, try removing 'var' from the declaration of prev_obj. (this is not the type of thing that should be global though...) –  Hersheezy Dec 14 '10 at 22:58
    
How is the Toggle function being called? –  Box9 Dec 14 '10 at 22:58
    
@Thomas Langston: I love jQuery, but cannot apply it on this project, need to keep this ultra light weight. –  Freelancer Dec 15 '10 at 8:22
    
@Hersheezy: I tried removing var, nothing changed –  Freelancer Dec 15 '10 at 8:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As I wrote in the comments, I suspect that the function is being called incorrectly as it looks like it should work.

On another note, you can simplify the logic a little, if you consider that what you want is the same as saying: "close the previous div no matter what (including if it's the same as the current div), and only open the current div if it is different to the previous one".

I'd also store the actual element in prev_obj instead of the ID, and set it to null initially. It'll make testing if there was a prev_obj easier, and also allows you to use the ID of "empty" if necessary (of course you probably won't, but just best practice).

var prev_obj = null;

function Toggle(id) { // Call it "id" to be clear it's not the actual object
   // Hide previous object if it exists
   if (prev_obj) prev_obj.style.display = 'none';

   // Show current object if it's the same as the previous one
   var obj = document.getElementById(id);
   if (obj !== prev_obj) {
      obj.style.display = 'block';
      prev_obj = obj;
   }
}

Make sure you call it by including single quotes around the id:

<div onclick="Toggle('div-id-here')"></div>
share|improve this answer

It is difficult to tell where your problem is from the details provided. You should be able to develop a solution with the tutorial linked below. Personally I'd loop over all the divs, hide them all, and then show the current one instead of holding a reference to the last div.

http://www.randomsnippets.com/2008/02/12/how-to-hide-and-show-your-div/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this resource. I'm fairly new to js, so sorry for asking, but how looping through 10 divs is better than just closing the specific div? –  Freelancer Dec 15 '10 at 8:29
    
@Freelancer - I think it is not necessarily better, but just easier to conceptualise - especially if you come from the jQuery world, where you don't need to write a loop for this. So you end up with just two statements: one to hide all divs, the other to show one of them. It's harder to make a mistake that way, but no, not necessarily better. –  Box9 Dec 15 '10 at 12:45
    
@Freelancer As @box9 said it is easier to conceptualize. Reduced complexity is much more important than increased performance, except where testing indicates performance improvements are required. –  Thomas Langston Dec 15 '10 at 15:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.