Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Currently I use a webservice to call the database and pass back an object back to my MVC app. The purpose is to display the data on a table.

So would it better if I just type the View to the class from the webservice, or should it always be typed to a model inside the MVC app? If I type it to a model inside my app, then I would have to create a new instance of the class and copy all the information over, which seems like a waste of time.

Which one is considered best practice? Strongly typing to a class from the webservice or a class within the MVC app?

Cheers.

share|improve this question
    
why do you even need a web service? why can't your controller call the model/database? you don't need web services for mvc apps, as controllers are capable of returning basically anything (html, xml, json, images, etc). –  RPM1984 Dec 14 '10 at 23:21
add comment

3 Answers

Best practice is to shield your application from external changes and your views from knowing the internals of the application. So I would just create a separate class and then map it to the web service class. You can also use something like AutoMapper to do the mapping for you.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You shouldn't have a dependency on the class from WebService. MVC's ViewModel is desined to be simple data representation. You can easely map your WebService class to ViewModel class using AutoMapper. This is considered as best practice and described in this book.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes. The best practice is to use a view model with no coupling to the domain model - a simple DtO. However, any validation applied to your domain needs to be replicated. So sometimes the trade-off is to pass domain entities to the view - and I'm very happy to do that.

In your case - go with the DTO as others on here suggest.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.