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I'm working on a project that the user navigates around by clicking on icons in 3d space. When a user engages one of these icons, the camera should pan and zoom so that the selected icon appears in the center of the screen at its original height and size (this is so when the 2d overlay is created over the icon, that it is the same size as its 3d counterpart.

My question is how to calculate the size a rendered object in a 3d view, I should mention that this is using the Alternativa 3D platform.

So there's a camera at (x1, y1, z1) with a FOV of f, pointing at an icon at (x2, y2, z2), all being rendered in a view of dimensions w and h. This is doing my head in trying to figure it out, any help would be much appreciated.

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and what about drawing 3d object projection with BitmapData and getting its size and shape with getPixel? –  www0z0k Dec 15 '10 at 0:45
    
Are you able to unproject the view or otherwise get the (world or object-relative) bounding box of the object? That's generally the right way to do it. –  MrGomez Dec 15 '10 at 1:27
    
if object is drawn on the stage it should be possible to take a screenshot with it. for the moment screenshot is taken 3d object should become white and the rest of the scene - get black. and it will be rather easy to calculate white area size, position and shape. By the way - how is your 3d object shaped? –  www0z0k Dec 15 '10 at 2:19
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured out the answer hunting around on another forum, what I was really looking for was how to get a 3d object to render in a view at a 1:1 size ratio.

I had come across the formula for calculating the focal length of a 3d camera:

F = d / tan(fov/2)

where d is one half the square root of your views height^2 + width^2

the value of F is the distance from the camera your object should be to render at a 1:1 size.

Hope this helps!

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