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Not a great title but I'm looking more for some guidance, have searched quite a bit. I'm building a web app with an MVC framework (but I think this is a more generic question). I'm trying to make many views that do a lot of AJAX style calls and say I have a site with users and they can add folders and files to their profile page. So the URL maybe like:

/profile/{id}

I have a Profile controller that returns a view with various information. I'd like files and folders listed on the profile to be dynamic so I want to populate it through AJAX calls. I was thinking I would have a URL like

/listFolders/{userId}

and

/listFiles/{folderId}

Is it reasonable to have these URLs return a JSON object for these two URLs and not even provide an HTML view (since, for the browser, the view will just be the whole profile page)? Also, what should I return for errors, say if the user/folder doesn't exist or the current logged in user doesn't have access the data? Is it reasonable to just set 404 or 403 HTTP error codes or do they need to return some kind of HTML? What if there are multiple reasons for it to fail and I'd like to pass that along? Should I arbitrarily choose HTTP error codes or define integer return codes like 0, 1, 2, etc? Also, should the URL specify that they are JSON, like listFoldersJSON instead of listFolders?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have used JSON in my previous projects. For errors, we return error codes.

We decided to do so because we were dealing with API clients. So we want to deal with error codes (REST is based on HTTP, so it was appropriate to return error codes).

Since you are writing your own application, you can pretty much choose how you want to send your errors to the view. You can create a error json object and in the view you have to check whether this object is not null.

pretty much a if-else in the view. Else you can return error codes and check for the code before rendering the JSON into whatever view you want to.

I would go with error codes, because that complies with the REST philosophy.

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Are you talking about HTTP error codes (like 404, 403, etc) or user defined ones, like 0, 1, 2, etc? Thanks for your reply! –  user98978979 Dec 15 '10 at 2:04
    
HTTP error codes. REST is based on plain HTTP. –  Vanchinathan Chandrasekaran Dec 15 '10 at 2:29

Generally speaking, I handle this situation by throwing a 500 internal server error with a status message. Most client libraries such as jQuery provide built in error handling with a failure callback like:

jQuery.ajax({
    success:function(response){
        //do some success stuff
   },
   error:function (xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError){                   
        //handle error
        alert(xhr.responseText);
        }    
});
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It's entirely feasible to return JSON objects as opposed to actual views.

As far as the url, you can use listFolders and listFiles without taking on the JSON. However, I recommend you use lower case urls for the sake of how the server is setup. For instance, I know on Apache that sometimes listFiles would be fine, but listfiles would lead to missing page exception.

With regards to errors: You could setup a header of sorts in your JSON response and use whatever system you'd like. For instance, you could do something like

status_code: 0 //where 0 means successful
status_detail:success!

Where, if the status_code is something other than 0, you'd check the status_detail and know to ignore everything else inside the response.

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Also, what should I return for errors, say if the user/folder doesn't exist or the current logged in user doesn't have access the data?

These are basic HTTP Error codes:

  • 401 : Unauthorized
  • 404 : Not found

There's a whole slew of error messages in the HTTP spec: HTTP Status Code Definitions


Also, should the URL specify that they are JSON, like listFoldersJSON instead of listFolders?

Generally, a good way to handle this is for the client to set the 'accepts' header to something like 'text/json' or 'text/xml' and for the server to parse it out and respond with the correct response. This way you can use the same URL but send back different views of the data (if you ever wanted)

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