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I'm trying to compute the value of cos x using the Taylor series formula

             infinity
             ----                  2k
             \            k      x
 cos(x) =    /        (-1)  * -------------
             ----                (2k)!
             k=0

Shown graphically at http://ppt.cc/G,DC

Here is my program.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    double sum=0.0,sum1=0.0;
 double x;
 cin>>x;
 for(int i=0 ; i<=10 ; i=i+1 )
 {
  for(int i=1 ; i<=20 ; i=i+1)
  {
   sum1=i*sum1+sum1;
  }
     sum=pow(-1,(double)i)*pow(x,(double)(2*i))/sum1+sum;
 }
 cout<<"Sum : "<<sum<<endl;
 system("pause");
 return 0;
}

The output is -1.#IND

Why?

How can I change the order of "sum1" to make it work right?

share|improve this question
    
You want us to download stuff first to find out what exactly is the problem you're trying to solve? And do you really need all that Windows-y stuff for homework? Can you show us your output? Please be more descriptive. –  birryree Dec 15 '10 at 3:02
    
Why are you casting an int to a double? What do you mean strange words? what words? Why would that print words? –  Falmarri Dec 15 '10 at 3:02
    
ideone.com/z5aA9 –  Ben Voigt Dec 15 '10 at 3:05
    
Long ago, when I wrote it for an 8bit ucontroller, I've used precomputed values for Taylor coefficients.. –  ruslik Dec 15 '10 at 3:14
    
It even gives you warnings. Don't ignore warnings. –  Falmarri Dec 15 '10 at 4:07

5 Answers 5

You're using i as the name of the controlling variables for two for-loops that are nested inside each other. That won't work the way you expect.

Next, sum1 is 0. No matter how many times you multiply zero by things and add zero to it, it's still zero. Then you divide by zero, which is why your final answer is NaN (not-a-number).

You need to fix the computation of factorial. Why don't you write a factorial function and test it by itself first?

share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why sum1=o ? –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 3:17
    
@Max: It's zero because you set it to zero as the very first line of your program (double sum1 = 0.0;). Then, you add zero to it a bunch of times, so it's still zero. –  Ben Voigt Dec 15 '10 at 4:01

You're redeclaring i inside your inner loop.

for(int i=0 ; i<=10 ; i=i+1 )
 {
  for(int i=1 ; i<=20 ; i=i+1)

It's been a while since I've done C, but I'm fairly sure that's an error.

share|improve this answer
2  
No, it's not. The inside one hides the outside one. It IS a very bad idea, but not a compile error. –  Ben Voigt Dec 15 '10 at 3:07
3  
@Ben Voigt: It's worse. It's programmer's error. –  ruslik Dec 15 '10 at 3:12
    
Why is it an error? –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 3:19
    
@Max: I doubt it does what you've expected. You've just used to write for (int i= ... for any loop. And it's bad because you are not notified with error, so it's you who should be careful. –  ruslik Dec 15 '10 at 3:27
    
@Falmarri: And the strangest thing is that this actually works correctly on my gcc!! int rez = 0; for (int i = 0; i< 10; i++) for (int i = 0; i< 10; i++) rez++; actually returns 100! –  ruslik Dec 15 '10 at 3:33

Many things are a bit weird. First : Please write ANSI C++ and try not to adopt the Microsoft Stuff, I don't really know but I guess those are for the pro's. Lets just stick to the basic stuff. Here is what you should do :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>

using namespace std;

double factorial(double fac)
{
    if(fac == 0)
        return 1;
    return fac * factorial(fac - 1);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    double sum=0.0;
    double x;
    cin >> x;

    for ( int i = 0 ; i <= 10 ; i++ )
    {
        double divisor = factorial ( 2 * i );
        if(divisor != 0.0)
        {
            sum += (double)( (pow( -1 , i ) * pow (x , 2*i )) / divisor );
        }
    }
    cout<<"Sum : "<<sum<<endl;
    //system("pause");
    return 0;
}

You are not only calculating the Factorial in a weird way, but you also dont use the math operators correctly and you dont perform the math calculation as you would like to. Also the code you wrote is very weird that way because it does not make it clear (not even for you from what I understand). Look at what others commented too. They are right.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks!!I will try it –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 3:23
    
#include "stdafx.h" as well... Forgot to add it. Otherwise from what I remember Mr. MSVC will not compile –  GeorgeAl Dec 15 '10 at 3:24
    
it's been a long time since I used MSVC, but all of the stuff in this program is ANSI standard, so it should compile without stdafx.h –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 3:30
    
@Ken: It depends on compiler options. If options are set to "precompile header stdafx.h", it will throw a fit if it can't find it. –  Ben Voigt Dec 15 '10 at 4:02

When you divide by 0, the result becomes infinity (which prints out as -1.#IND)

Muggen has given a good naive way of doing this, recomputing the whole factorial each time, and using the pow function to compute the alternating sign in the formula. But there are improvements that you can make to this code faster.

  1. The Factorial function in one iteration of the loop can take advantage of the fact that you already multiplied most of the terms you need in the prior iterations of the loop.

  2. The exponent (-1)^k is just a way to alternate between addition and subtraction -- you can replace that by having a variable that alternates its sign every iteration through the loop. (There are other ways to do this besides what I showed here, the point is that you don't need to call the pow() function to do it.)

  3. The other power function x^(2k) can also be unrolled the same way.

  4. I eliminated the first iteration of the loop, because I could calculate it in my head (it was 1.0, for any x), and set the initial value of sum to 1.0. This way factorial doesn't ever get multiplied by 0.

Try this instead

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
 double x;
 cin>>x;
 double sum=1.0, factorial=1.0, sign=-1.0, power=1.0;
 for(int i=1 ; i<=10 ; i=i+1 )
 {
     factorial*= (2*i-1) * 2*i;
     power *= x * x; 
     sum += sign * power/factorial;
     sign = -sign;
 }
 cout<<"Sum : "<<sum<<endl;
 system("pause");
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
factorial*= (2*i-1) * 2*i; at first iteration will become 0. When i==0, 2*0*Whatever == 0 too. –  GeorgeAl Dec 15 '10 at 3:30
    
Thank you very much for responses But the output stayed the same.. –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 3:33
    
@Muggen, @Max: fixed. –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 3:35
    
+1 for smart solution, had something like that in my mind too but didn't want to confuse OP. –  GeorgeAl Dec 15 '10 at 3:37
    
Thank you very much!!!!! –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 3:38

It does not appear that you are computing the factorial correctly. should be

sum1 = 1.0;
for(int k=1 ; k<=i*2 ; k=k+1) 
{ 
    sum1 *= k; 
} 

Notice that the factorial terminates a at your outer loop i, and not the fixed number 20, When i is 5, you don't want 20!, you want (2*5)!.

share|improve this answer
    
But the output stayed the same,but thank you for response –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 3:13
    
-1: sum1 *= 2*k isn't going to compute a factorial -- it's going to skip half of the numbers that need to be multiplied in this formula. –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 3:16
    
my bad, I just fixed it –  ThomasMcLeod Dec 15 '10 at 3:19
    
@Thomas: I've rescinded my downvote. –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 3:29
1  
And per your code, you're redeclaring a second variable named sum1 whose scope is limited to the loop, and hides the outer variable for the duration of the loop. Just like Max did with i, and rightly got rebuked for doing. –  Ben Voigt Dec 15 '10 at 4:22

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