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What's the easiest way to create my own std::cerr so that it is line-by-line threadsafe.

I am preferably looking for the code to do it.

What I need is so that a line of output (terminated with std::endl) generated by one thread stays as a line of output when I actually see it on my console. (And is not mixed with some other thread's output)

SOLUTION: std::cerr is MUCH slower than cstdio. I prefer using fprintf(stderr, "The message") inside of a CriticalSectionLocker class whos' constructor aquires a thread-safe lock and the desturctor releases it.

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1  
How do you imagine creating a thread local buffer "hooked" into std::cerr would reduce buffering over a thread local buffer "outside", then writing full lines into std::cerr? A buffer's a buffer. std::ostringstream is a typical general purpose approach for this. –  Tony D Dec 15 '10 at 3:46
3  
Are you by any chance looking for a thread-safe logging library? –  yasouser Dec 15 '10 at 3:47
1  
I recently learnt about the log4cpp project (log4cpp.sourceforge.net). Not sure whether it provides what you are looking for!?!? Maybe worthwhile to check it out. –  yasouser Dec 15 '10 at 4:01
    
your own iostream cerr implementation is potentially much more buggy than using a well-tested library like log4cpp –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 4:20

5 Answers 5

You don't. There's nothing about std::cerr (nor any other shared object in the whole entire language) which can know which thread is making a particular call to the << operator to prevent interleaving.

The best you can do is create a bunch of thread-specific logger objects that each accumulate data until a newline is reached, then acquire a lock that protects cerr so as to write an entire line at once to cerr while holding the lock.

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I was intending to use my own class. How do I write these iostream-based logger objects you describe? that was my original question. I know nothing about iostreams other than cerr << "message" –  unixman83 Dec 15 '10 at 4:13
    
That I'm not so sure about. I think there's several options: #1 you can write your own streambuf that flushes data to cerr and use a normal ostream to format data for it, #2 You can use a std::stringstream inside each thread's logger to accumulate the data (the stringstream is completely compatible with all of cerr's formatting primitives, but exposing them is more work). Where you get a lock to flush to cerr will be platform specific. #3 you can do something with sprintf and formatting strings instead. –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 4:19
    
Or get something like log4cpp –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 4:21
    
what about adding io manipulators to lock and unlock a mutex? eg: cerr << my::lockstream() << msg << std::endl << my::unlockstream(); –  Brian Jack Nov 9 '14 at 7:54

Here's a thread safe line based logging solution I cooked up at some point. It uses boost mutex for thread safety. It is slightly more complicated than necessary because you can plug in output policies (should it go to a file, stderr, or somewhere else?):

logger.h:

#ifndef LOGGER_20080723_H_
#define LOGGER_20080723_H_

#include <boost/thread/mutex.hpp>
#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
#include <sstream>
#include <ctime>
#include <ostream>

namespace logger {
    namespace detail {

        template<class Ch, class Tr, class A>
        class no_output {
        private:
            struct null_buffer {
                template<class T>
                null_buffer &operator<<(const T &) {
                    return *this;
                }
            };
        public:
            typedef null_buffer stream_buffer;

        public:
            void operator()(const stream_buffer &) {
            }
        };

        template<class Ch, class Tr, class A>
        class output_to_clog {
        public:
            typedef std::basic_ostringstream<Ch, Tr, A> stream_buffer;
        public:
            void operator()(const stream_buffer &s) {
                static boost::mutex mutex;
                boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex);
                std::clog << now() << ": " << s.str() << std::endl;
            }

        private:
            static std::string now() {
                char buf[64];
                const time_t tm = time(0);  
                strftime(buf, sizeof(buf), "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S", localtime(&tm));
                return buf;
            }

        };

        template<template <class Ch, class Tr, class A> class OutputPolicy, class Ch = char, class Tr = std::char_traits<Ch>, class A = std::allocator<Ch> >
        class logger {
            typedef OutputPolicy<Ch, Tr, A> output_policy;
        public:
            ~logger() {
                output_policy()(m_SS);
            }
        public:
            template<class T>
            logger &operator<<(const T &x) {
                m_SS << x;
                return *this;
            }
        private:
            typename output_policy::stream_buffer m_SS;
        };
    }

    class log : public detail::logger<detail::output_to_clog> {
    };
}

#endif

Usage looks like this:

logger::log() << "this is a test" << 1234 << "testing";

note the lack of a '\n' and std::endl since it's implicit. The contents are buffered and then atomically output using the template specified policy. This implementation also prepends the line with a timestamp since it is for logging purposes. The no_output policy is stricly optional, it's what I use when I want to disable logging.

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Why not just create a locking class and use it where ever you want to do thread-safe IO?

class LockIO
{
    static pthread_mutex_t *mutex;  
public:
    LockIO() { pthread_mutex_lock( mutex ); }
    ~LockIO() { pthread_mutex_unlock( mutex ); }
};

static pthread_mutex_t* getMutex()
{
    pthread_mutex_t *mutex = new pthread_mutex_t;
    pthread_mutex_init( mutex, NULL );
    return mutex;
}
pthread_mutex_t* LockIO::mutex = getMutex();

Then you put any IO you want in a block:

std::cout <<"X is " <<x <<std::endl;

becomes:

{
    LockIO lock;
    std::cout <<"X is " <<x <<std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

An improvement (that doesn't really fit in a comment) on the approach in unixman's comment.

#define LOCKED_ERR \
    if(ErrCriticalSectionLocker crit = ErrCriticalSectionLocker()); \
    else std::cerr

Which can be used like

LOCKED_ERR << "ERR: " << message << endl;

if ErrCriticalSectionLocker is implemented carefully.

But, I would personally prefer Ken's suggestion.

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+1 for creative use of the lifecycle of temporaries. Could you provide an implementation of ErrCriticalSectionLocker, becuase the semantics are very non-trivial? –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 14:55
    
Hmm. I see; You can use this method without parenthesis but I see little point in that, since my C (I come from C background) programming style generally calls for parenthesis. Also, ErrCriticalSectionLocker is confusing... –  unixman83 Jul 18 '11 at 9:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This:

#define myerr(e) {CiriticalSectionLocker crit; std::cerr << e << std::endl;}

works on most compilers for the common case of myerr("ERR: " << message << number).

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This presumes you don't want to use the << operator for formatting (e.g. cerr << "This log message has been printed " << ntimes << " times." << endl;) –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 14:54
1  
Hrm. I'm actually wrong about that, because I forgot temporarily how macros work. All you'd need to do to get formatting is call lerr("This log message has been printed " << ntimes << " times.") and the text substitution would get it right. –  Ken Bloom Dec 15 '10 at 18:53

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