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I'm new to Python and I am loving it, but was wondering if there was a better way to do a couple list manipulations.

This one is relatively sane, but it seems like I might have missed a built-in function.

def zip_plus(source_list, additional_list):
    """
    Like zip but does plus operation where zip makes a tuple

    >>> a = []
    >>> zip_plus(a, [[1, 2], [3, 4]])
    >>> a
    [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
    >>> zip_plus(a, [[11, 12], [13, 14]])
    >>> a
    [[1, 2, 11, 12], [3, 4, 13, 14]]
    """
    if source_list:
        for i, v in enumerate(additional_list):
            source_list[i] += v
    else:
        source_list.extend(additional_list)

This one is hacky and hard to read, any ideas on doing it cleaner or more pythonic?

def zip_join2(source_list, additional_list):
    """
    Pretty gross and specialized function to combine 2 types of lists of things,
    specifically a list of tuples of something, list
    of which the something is left untouched

    >>> a = []
    >>> zip_join2(a, [(5, [1, 2]), (6, [3, 4])])
    >>> a
    [(5, [1, 2]), (6, [3, 4])]
    >>> zip_join2(a, [(5, [11, 12]), (6, [13, 14])])
    >>> a
    [(5, [1, 2, 11, 12]), (6, [3, 4, 13, 14])]
    """
    if source_list:
        for i, v in enumerate(additional_list):
            source_list[i] = (source_list[i][0], source_list[i][1] + v[1])
    else:
        source_list.extend(additional_list)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

List Comprehension using tuple unpacking and boolean logic.

zip_plus:

from itertools import izip_longest
def zip_plus(first, second):
    return [(a or []) + (b or []) for a, b in izip_longest(first, second)]

print zip_plus([], [[1, 2], [3, 4]])
print zip_plus([[1, 2], [3, 4]], [[11, 12], [13, 14]])
print zip_plus([[1, 2], [3, 4]], [[11, 12]])
print zip_plus([[1, 2]], [[11, 12], [13, 14]])

zip_join2:

from itertools import izip_longest
def zip_join2(first, second):
    return [(a or c or 0, (b or []) + (d or [])) for (a, b), (c, d) in \
              izip_longest(first, second, fillvalue=(None, None))]

print zip_join2([], [(5, [1, 2]), (6, [3, 4])])
print zip_join2([(5, [1, 2]), (6, [3, 4])], [(5, [11, 12]), (6, [13, 14])])

The 0 covers the case where a is 0 and c is None. Some of this makes me cringe too.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the (a or []) + (b or []) idiom too, and will probably use it in my algorithm as well, thanks for taking the time. –  Scott B Dec 15 '10 at 18:12
    
@Scott B, you're welcome. I love these types of problems and the solutions people provide. I am taking away something from SO everyday. Your use of doctest style docstrings has inspired me to consider using doctest more and not just pytest/unittest. :-) –  kevpie Dec 15 '10 at 18:25
def zip_plus(first, second):
    return [x+y for (x,y) in zip(first, second)]

def zip_join2(first, second):
    return [(x[0], x[1]+y[1]) for (x,y) in zip(first, second)]
share|improve this answer
    
This coupled with research that led me to izip_longest (since I wanted to be able to do my work on an accumulating basis) looks nice, thanks! –  Scott B Dec 15 '10 at 5:20
1  
Also this needed the if blocks from other answers: return [x+y if x and y else x or y for (x,y) in izip_longest(first, second)] –  Scott B Dec 15 '10 at 5:33

First, to be more Pythonic, I'd avoid mutating inputs.

Second, you probably want something more like a dict instead of a list of tuples for your zip_join2 function. Like so:

>>> a = {5 : [1,2], 6 : [3,4]}
>>> b = {5 : [11,12], 6 : [13,14]}
>>> for k,v in b.iteritems():
...     a[k].extend(v)
>>> a = {5: [1,2,11,12], 6: [3,4,13,14]}

You might also want to consider using a defaultdict (from the collections module), in case the second dictionary has keys not present in the first.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I didn't love the idea of mutating inputs, thanks for the feedback. –  Scott B Dec 15 '10 at 5:29
def zip_plus(source_list, additional_list):
  return map(lambda a, b: a + b if a and b else a or b, source_list, additional_list)

def zip_join2(source_list, additional_list):
  return map(lambda x, y: (x[0], x[1] + y[1]), source_list, additional_list)

map operates in parallel.

share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't say it "operates in parallel"... that sounds to me like it spreads the computation out over multiple cores. –  perimosocordiae Dec 15 '10 at 5:27
    
I am referring to this comment in the linked docs: ' function ...is applied to the items from all iterables in parallel' –  sje397 Dec 15 '10 at 5:28
    
Applying the same style of if to your version of zip_join2 is needed as well. I like this answer too. –  Scott B Dec 15 '10 at 5:28

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