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The code snippet is coming from django view code, but it doesn't matter much.

Let's say I have the following piece of code...

def unsubscribe(request):
  #start of block
  user = request.user
  sid = request.POST.get('subscription_id')
  try:
    sub = Subscription.objects.get(id=sid)
  except ObjectDoesNotExist:
    return ajax_response(False, [('subscription', 'Given subscription does not exist.')])
  if sub.user != user:
    return ajax_response(False, [('subscription', 'Invalid permission.')])
  #end of block.
  sub.is_active = False
  sub.save()
  return ajax_response(True)

and say, I have another function resubscribe() that does exactly same thing as the above function, except it does sub.is_active = True.

In that case, what would be the best way to organize the code, so that code between #block and #endblock aren't duplicated? I guess in general, this question can be written as:

There's a block of code that is copy-and-pasted over many different functions. however, this block of code contains return statement. in that case, what would be the best way to abstract this piece of logic out?

EDIT: fixed code snippet.

EDIT2: Actually, the easy way to solve this question is by creating a function say, toggle_active_status, which takes request and a boolean. (I figured it out after posting out the question).

However, i'm wondering about the case where the different logic between the functions is more than 1 line... like, say, code between #block and #endlbock only does input validation, and potentially any arbitrary application logic can come after.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A couple options that haven't been shown yet:

Since this is a verification routine, use exceptions to indicate failure, and a normal None (ignored) return to indicate success:

def verify_permissions(request):
  user = request.user
  sid = request.POST.get('subscription_id')
  try:
    sub = Subscription.objects.get(id=sid)
  except ObjectDoesNotExist:
    raise PermissionError, 'Given subscription does not exist.'
  if sub.user != user:
    raise PermissionError, 'Invalid permission.'

def subscribe(request):
  try:
    verify_permissions(request)
    sub.save()
    return ajax_response(True)
  except PermissionError, why:
    return ajax_response(False, [('subscription', why)])

Or, since Python is dynamically typed and it's apparently OK to call ajax_response in a couple different ways: return the arguments used to construct the response, and check the value of the first one.

def verify_permissions(request, purpose):
  user = request.user
  sid = request.POST.get('subscription_id')
  try:
    sub = Subscription.objects.get(id=sid)
  except ObjectDoesNotExist:
    return (False, [(purpose, 'Given subscription does not exist.')]) 
  if sub.user != user:
    return (False, [(purpose, 'Invalid permission.')])
  return (True,)

def subscribe(request):
  result = verify_permissions(request, 'subscription')
  if result[0]: sub.save()
  return ajax_response(*result)
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I actually like your suggestion... Let's see how this question goes. –  Jeeyoung Kim Dec 15 '10 at 20:50

Factor out the duplicated chunk and have the difference be passed in, creating wrapper functions that pass in the difference:

def alter_subscription(request, make_active):
  # start of block
  # (...)
  # end of block
  sub.is_active = make_active
  sub.save()
  return ajax_response(True)

def unsubscribe(request):
  return alter_subscription(request, False)

def resubscribe(request):
  return alter_subscription(request, True)
share|improve this answer
    
If the common code is only doing validation, call it from the wrapper(s) and check the return value. If this is a django question and you're trying to do validation, maybe look at middleware or a decorator? –  Elliot Foster Dec 15 '10 at 7:38
    
But don't call the parameter "bool", because that masks a builtin (the name of the type). :) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 15 '10 at 10:50
    
fixed (re: "bool") ty, Karl. :) –  Elliot Foster Dec 16 '10 at 0:07

One way is to simply create a separate function containing the duplicated functionality. You can use the parameters of the function to introduce the necessary differences.

If the code snippet returns something, then you might use a convention, such as to return None if the function should not return, or an object otherwise. In your caller function, just test whether the returned parameter is None or not, and return the returned variable if it isn't None.

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i've actually thought of it, and created the function def _toggle_subscription(request, toggle_to): which has the line sub.is_active = toggle_to... but i feel like i've exploited the fact that this example has such a small differences between the provided codes. What if the difference between the two functions are conisiderable? –  Jeeyoung Kim Dec 15 '10 at 7:11
    
Well, if the difference is considerable, I don't think that counts as code duplication. –  Herman Schaaf Dec 15 '10 at 7:12
    
Sorry, i guess i wasn't being specific... when i refer to the "difference" i meant to point out at the difference between the non-common logics. in the provided example, the difference between subscribe() and unsubscribe() will be sub.is_active = False(or True). However, what if the code between #block and #endblock are just preliminary checks, and the actual logic that follows is more complicated? –  Jeeyoung Kim Dec 15 '10 at 7:15
    
In the more complex cases, you can try the second suggestion with the conventional 'None' result. Or try my suggestion. :) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 15 '10 at 10:52

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