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I have a class with a container (containing pointer) as a member:

MyClass{
private:
   std::vector<MyObject*> _VecMyObjs;
public:
   const std::vector<MyObject* const> GetVecMyObj();
}

Now I try to implement GetVecMyObj(). Here is what I came up with...

const vector<MyObject *const> ACI_CALL MyClass::GetVecMyObjs()
{
   const vector<MyObject *const> VecMyObjs;
   VecMyObjs.assign( _VecMyObjs.begin(), _VecMyObjs.end());
   return VecMyObjs;
}

But of course the compiler is warning me, that I use the assign-function on a const-Object. Is there a better way to do this? I mean, I don't want VecMyObjs to change VecMyObj outside of the class, of course. How can I achieve that without a compiler warning?

EDIT: Okay. Thank you everybody. It's now like this:

const vector<MyObject *const> ACI_CALL MyClass::GetVecMyObjs()
{
   const vector<MyObject *const> VecMyObjs;
   VecMyObjs.assign( _VecMyObjs.begin(), _VecMyObjs.end());
   return VecMyObjs;
}

But, I can't get around the assign-function, right? E.g. casting the "original" doesn't work, if I want "everything" to be constant.

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4  
You don't need VicMyObjs to be const inside the GetVecMyObjs function... that qualification will be added implicitly when it is returned. –  Tony D Dec 15 '10 at 11:14
    
Are you sure you want vector<MyObject* const> and not vector<MyObject const*>? And why is returning by reference to const not feasible? –  Palmik Dec 15 '10 at 11:30
    
about your edit that you want everything to be constant: as others already pointed out, you are making the pointers const, not the pointed objects. These can be changed, thus changing your internal objects. –  stefaanv Dec 15 '10 at 11:54
    
@stefaanv: Good point! I think/hope my final solution is taking care of that. (see below) –  AudioDroid Dec 15 '10 at 12:00
2  
Even if you wanted a std::vector< MyObject* const > you can't have one as the template argument to a vector must be an assignable type and const objects are not (generally) assignable. –  Charles Bailey Dec 15 '10 at 12:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not sure std::vector<MyObject * const> (vector of constant pointers) is really what you want : I believe you mean std::vector<MyObject const *> (vector of pointer to constant objects).

  1. The "first level" of constness (pointer constness) is naturally achieved by returning a constant reference on the vector. Only const_iterator can be obtained from a const vector, so you have a guarantee that the pointers won't be modified (but pointees can be).

  2. The "second level" of constness (pointee constness) is harder to obtain. Either return a new instance of a vector as already pointed out by others :

    return std::vector<const MyObject *>(_VecMyObjs.begin(), _VecMyObjs.end());
    

    Or, if applicable, try to look into the Boost Pointer Container library (and most notably ptr_vector) which offers, among other things, correct constness propagation :

    Propagates constness such that one cannot modify the objects via a const_iterator.

You have to understand that returning a const reference on a vector guarantees that it cannot be modified (no insertion, deletion, or modification of its value). So, in most cases, returning a const std::vector<T> & is the way to go because if does not involve any copying. The issue here is really specific to container of pointers, where constness of the values does not provide constness of the pointees.

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Thanks, I knew there was something like that...Maybe I should start another question-thread, but what is the difference between "std::vector<const MyObject * const> and "const vector<const MyObject *> then? Or is it the same? –  AudioDroid Dec 15 '10 at 12:12
1  
@AudioDroid: no : you can modify a non-const vector (push_back, erase, ...), while you can't modify a const vector (which, in a sense, only provides read-only access to the already stored elements). However, regarding const-ness of the elements, they offer the same guarantee. –  icecrime Dec 15 '10 at 12:18
    
Great. Thanks! If you can double-check my own answer....I hope I understood you completely. –  AudioDroid Dec 15 '10 at 12:33
    
if you have vector<T*> then a const vector<T*> & means you cannot change the elements in the vector and you cannot add new ones but it does not change the pointers into pointers-to-const. –  CashCow Dec 15 '10 at 12:44

If you want to return a fresh vector, don't make it const. Put the const keyword before the *.

std::vector<MyObject const*> MyClass::GetVecMyObj()
{
    return std::vector<MyObject const*>(_VecMyObjs.begin(), _VecMyObjs.end());
}

I omitted the conversion to TRoadSgmt as you didn't specify the inheritance of this class.

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Oops, [TRoadSgmt] wasn't meant to be in this general example. I just corrected it. –  AudioDroid Dec 15 '10 at 11:34

Aside from changing the signature to remove the const from the vector (as it's a copy of the vector), I'm assuming that you don't want people outside to modify the contents, as a result, make a const pointer , i.e.

vector<const MyObject *> ACI_CALL MyClass::GetVecMyObjs()
{
   return vector<const MyObject *>(_VecMyObjs.begin(), _VecMyObjs.end());
}

Now the returned vector is a copy, which contain const pointer (which means you can't modify the pointed object via this pointer) - well that's the agreement, there's nothing preventing someone from const_casting that away (using that is UB anyways!)

If you really want to prevent modifications, return a copy (or clone of each object) in the vector.

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The const keyword in the declaration of VecMyObjs gives an error. –  larsmans Dec 15 '10 at 11:24
    
I though the syntax "const vector<MyObject*>, makes sure that the "content" of the vector (in this case: all the pointers to MyObjects) constant. –  AudioDroid Dec 15 '10 at 11:29
    
@larsmans - teach me for blindly copying! Thx, fixed. @AudioDroid, I don't think so, it only makes the vector object constant, I don't believe there are any guarantees about what it holds.. –  Nim Dec 15 '10 at 11:40
    
Should add, I would also use the constructor of vector directly rather than assign as indicated by @Frerich in that answer, though the const syntax is slightly different. –  Nim Dec 15 '10 at 11:44
const vector<const MyObject *> MyClass::GetVecMyObjs() const
{
   return vector<const MyObject *>(_VecMyObjs.begin(), _VecMyObjs.end());
}

This seems to be the solution to me. I can tell now, thanks to all the different posts I got. Thanks all of you! Have a nice one... (Or let me know, if I am still wrong somewhere.)

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you are returning a new vector instance, so there is no point in making the returned vector const (it's a copy anyway, why would you care if the caller push_back something into it ?). –  icecrime Dec 15 '10 at 12:32
1  
@icecrime: Calling a mutating operation on a temporary is very likely to be an error. Returning a const object catches client code that makes an incorrect assumption, perhaps that they are operating on a reference. Preventing clz.GetVecMyObjs().push_back(x) is probably a good thing. Returning a const object doesn't inhibit normal copying of the return value, e.g. vector<const MyObject*> cpy = clz.GetVecMyObjs(); cpy.push_back(x);. –  Charles Bailey Dec 15 '10 at 12:46
    
@Charles Bailey: you're right, that's something I hadn't considered –  icecrime Dec 15 '10 at 12:48

Assuming the vector of the non-const pointers resides somewhere during the entire lifetime that you are going to use the const-version so you don't need a copy, and if there a lot of them so you don't want to copy the vector, you are better off returning some kind of wrapper object that is custom made to only give the user const-access.

The address of the first element of the vector will be T** and you can't cast that to const T** (correctly) nor can you cast it to const T*const * (which would be safe but the language does not allow it).

If you were allowed to convert the latter it would be perfect for creating a read-only view.

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