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I am trying to understand the difference between matches() and find().

According to the Javadoc, (from what I understand), matches() will search the entire string even if it finds what it is looking for, and find() will stop when it finds what it is looking for.

If that assumption is correct, I cannot see whenever you would want to use matches() instead of find(), unless you want to count the number of matches it finds.

In my opionon the String class should then have find() instead of matches() as an inbuilt method.

So to summarize:

  1. Is my assumption correct?
  2. When is it useful to use matches() instead of find()?
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Be aware that calling find() multiple times may return different results for the same Matcher. See my answer below. –  Leo Holanda Aug 23 '13 at 18:02
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3 Answers

up vote 61 down vote accepted

matches tries to match the expression against the entire string and implicitly add a ^ at the start and $ at the end of your pattern, meaning it will not look for a substring. Hence the output of this code:

public static void main(String[] args) throws ParseException {
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("\\d\\d\\d");
    Matcher m = p.matcher("a123b");
    System.out.println(m.find());
    System.out.println(m.matches());

    p = Pattern.compile("^\\d\\d\\d$");
    m = p.matcher("123");
    System.out.println(m.find());
    System.out.println(m.matches());
}

/* output:
true
false
true
true
*/

123 is a substring of a123b so the find() method outputs true. matches() only 'sees' a123b which is not the same as 123 and thus outputs false.

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Thank you. This helped alot –  Shervin Dec 15 '10 at 13:46
    
@Shervin: Glad I could help. Good luck. :-) –  Sanjay T. Sharma Dec 15 '10 at 13:47
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matches return true if the whole string matches the given pattern. find tries to find a substring that matches the pattern.

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13  
You could say that matches(p) is the same as find("^" + p + "$") if that's any clearer. –  jensgram Dec 15 '10 at 12:56
1  
Just an example to clarify the answer: "[a-z]+" with string "123abc123" will fail using matches() but will succeed using find(). –  Max Dec 15 '10 at 12:57
2  
@Max Exactly, "123abc123".matches("[a-z]+") will fail just as "123abc123".find("^[a-z]+$") would. My point was, that matches() goes for a complete match, just as find() with both start and end anchors. –  jensgram Dec 15 '10 at 12:59
3  
Pattern.compile("some pattern").matcher(str).matches() is equal to Pattern.compile("^some pattern$").matcher(str).find() –  AlexR Dec 15 '10 at 13:09
    
@AlexR What I was trying to say (using a highly abbreviated syntax) :) –  jensgram Dec 15 '10 at 13:14
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matches() will only return true if the full string is matched. find() will try to find the next occurrence within the substring that matches the regex. Note the emphasis on "the next". That means, the result of calling find() multiple times might not be the same. In addition, by using find() you can call start() to return the position the substring was matched.

final Matcher subMatcher = Pattern.compile("\\d+").matcher("skrf35kesruytfkwu4ty7sdfs");
System.out.println("Found: " + subMatcher.matches());
System.out.println("Found: " + subMatcher.find() + " - position " + subMatcher.start());
System.out.println("Found: " + subMatcher.find() + " - position " + subMatcher.start());
System.out.println("Found: " + subMatcher.find() + " - position " + subMatcher.start());
System.out.println("Found: " + subMatcher.find());
System.out.println("Found: " + subMatcher.find());
System.out.println("Matched: " + subMatcher.matches());

System.out.println("-----------");
final Matcher fullMatcher = Pattern.compile("^\\w+$").matcher("skrf35kesruytfkwu4ty7sdfs");
System.out.println("Found: " + fullMatcher.find() + " - position " + fullMatcher.start());
System.out.println("Found: " + fullMatcher.find());
System.out.println("Found: " + fullMatcher.find());
System.out.println("Matched: " + fullMatcher.matches());
System.out.println("Matched: " + fullMatcher.matches());
System.out.println("Matched: " + fullMatcher.matches());
System.out.println("Matched: " + fullMatcher.matches());

Will output:

Found: false
Found: true - position 4
Found: true - position 17
Found: true - position 20
Found: false
Found: false
Matched: false
-----------
Found: true - position 0
Found: false
Found: false
Matched: true
Matched: true
Matched: true
Matched: true

So, be careful when calling find() multiple times if the Matcher object was not reset, even when the regex is surrounded with ^ and $ to match the full string.

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