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int u1, u2;  
unsigned long elm1[20], _mulpre[16][20], res1[40], res2[40]; 64 bits long     
res1, res2 initialized to zero.  

l = 60;  
while (l)  
{  
    for (i = 0; i < 20; i += 2)  
    {  
        u1 = (elm1[i] >> l) & 15;  
        u2 = (elm1[i + 1] >> l) & 15;

        for (k = 0; k < 20; k += 2)  
        {  
            simda = _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *) &_mulpre[u1][k]);  
            simdb = _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *) &res1[i + k]);  
            simdb = _mm_xor_si128  (simda, simdb);  
            _mm_store_si128 ((__m128i *)&res1[i + k], simdb);  

            simda = _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *)&_mulpre[u2][k]);  
            simdb = _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *)&res2[i + k]);  
            simdb = _mm_xor_si128  (simda, simdb);  
            _mm_store_si128 ((__m128i *)&res2[i + k], simdb);  
        } 
    }
    l -= 4;
    All res1, res2 values are left shifted by 4 bits.  
}

The above mentioned code is called many times in my program (profiler shows 98%).

EDIT: In the inner loop, res1[i + k] values are loaded many times for same (i + k) values. I tried with this inside the while loop, I loaded all the res1 values into simd registers (array) and use array elements inside the innermost for loop to update array elements . Once both for loops are done, I stored the array values back to the res1, re2. But computation time increases with this. Any idea where I got wrong? The idea seemed to be correct

Any suggestion to make it faster is welcome.

share|improve this question
3  
What is this code supposed to do? How are you approaching the data locality issues (this in my experience is the most important part of optimization)? – qdot Dec 15 '10 at 13:23
    
in each iteration res1, res2 variables will be XORed with _mulpre (shifted (u1, u2)), and then res1, res2 both are shifted by 4-bits to the left – anup Dec 15 '10 at 13:59
    
res1, res2, _mulpre are all local variables and accessed consecuitvely – anup Dec 15 '10 at 14:00
1  
Have you actually tested this code ? Only it looks like you're trying to do misaligned and stores ? [Or maybe unsigned long is 64 bits on your system (in which case you might want to use uint64_t instead, to avoid confusion).] – Paul R Dec 15 '10 at 14:30
2  
@anup: OK - I suggest you use types from <stdint.h> then to avoid confusion. – Paul R Dec 15 '10 at 14:37

Unfortunately the most obvious optimisations are probably already being done by the compiler:

  • You can pull &_mulpre[u1] and &mulpre[u2] our of the inner loop.
  • You can pull &res1[i] our of the inner loop.
  • Using different variables for the two inner operations, and reordering them, might allow for better pipelining.

Possibly swapping the outer loops would improve cache locality on elm1.

share|improve this answer

Well, you could always call it fewer times :-)

The total input & output data looks relatively small, depending on you design and expected input it might be feasible to just cache computations or do lazy evaluation instead of up-front.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried with _mm_prefetch, but the required time increased instead.. – anup Dec 15 '10 at 14:40
    
Um, this answer is about looking at how the function is used and see if there is any potential algorithmic optimization, not about finding a magic instruction. You question lacks some information to give good suggestions on such updates, and would probably require more effort and review than you are likely to find at a site like this anyway (well, unless you put up a bounty of course) – Christoffer Dec 15 '10 at 17:45

There is very little you can do with a routine such as this, since loads and stores will be the dominant factor (you're doing 2 loads + 1 store = 4 bus cycles for a single computational instruction).

share|improve this answer
    
are there any better intrinsics for memory handling than I have used in my code? – anup Dec 15 '10 at 14:38
    
Nope - you're bandwidth-limited and there is no silver bullet that will change this (other than using a better algorithm and/or faster hardware). – Paul R Dec 15 '10 at 14:40
l = 60;  
while (l)  
{  
    for (i = 0; i < 20; i += 2)  
    {  
        u1 = (elm1[i] >> l) & 15;  
        u2 = (elm1[i + 1] >> l) & 15;

        for (k = 0; k < 20; k += 2)  
        {  
            _mm_stream_si128 ((__m128i *)&res1[i + k],
                    _mm_xor_si128  (
                                    _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *) &_mulpre[u1][k]),
                                    _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *) &res1[i + k]
                                   ));  

            mm_stream_si128 ((__m128i *)&res2[i + k],    
                    _mm_xor_si128  (
                                    _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *)&_mulpre[u2][k]), 
                                    _mm_load_si128 ((__m128i *)&res2[i + k])
                                   ));  
        } 
    }
    l -= 4;
    All res1, res2 values are left shifted by 4 bits.  
}
  1. Do remember your are using intrinsic, using less _128mi/_mm128 value will speed up your program.
  2. try _mm_stream_si128(), it might speed up the storing process.
  3. try prefetch
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