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is it possible, like this:

template< typename C,
          typename R,
          typename A,
          typename F=R (C::*)(A) >
class MemberFuncPtr { ...
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually,it seems pretty right to me, I do not get any errors for this piece of code:

template< typename C, 
          typename R, 
          typename A, 
          typename F=R (C::*)(A) > 
class MemberFuncPtr
{
        C & Cmember;
        F f;
public:
        MemberFuncPtr(C & c, F func):Cmember(c), f(func) {}
        R DoIt(A & a)
        {
                return (Cmember.*f)(a);
        }
};
class classA
{
public:
        int toInt(double aa)
        {
                return int(aa);
        }
};
int main()
{
        classA aInstance;
        MemberFuncPtr<classA,int,double> xx(aInstance,&classA::toInt); 
        return 0;
} 

You can observe the code here.

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Actually, in C++ main() must return integer, so your code is not exactly valid with standard. Moreover, argument of MemberFuncPtr::DoIt must be lvalue, which could be little pain. My little enhanced version: ideone.com/gA7kJ –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 15 '10 at 14:25
    
@Pawel Zubrycki: Yes, I forgot about the main() but your version is enhanced with what, 3 lines of obvious, non-magical code? Come on.... –  ali_bahoo Dec 15 '10 at 14:52
    
That is why I called it little. –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 15 '10 at 15:05
    
@Pawel Zubrycki: So does your little enhanced version have anything to do with your statement that MemberFuncPtr::DoIt must be lvalue? –  ali_bahoo Dec 15 '10 at 15:10
1  
@Pawel Zubrycki: main is special and doesn't need an explicit return statement. 3.6.1 [basic.start.main] / 6: If control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is of executing return 0;. –  Charles Bailey Dec 15 '10 at 15:36

Yes, it is perfectly valid.

class X {
public:
    void Y() {
    }
};

int main() {
    MemberFuncPtr<X, void, void> func;
}

Build succeeded.

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Using typedef will make your code more user-friendly. Just typedef pointer to function, then use it as other types.

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1  
I thought, typedef is not possible for declaring template arguments –  ali_bahoo Dec 15 '10 at 13:19
    
how do I write typedef for templated types ? (ok sad_man already replied it, its not possible) –  uray Dec 15 '10 at 13:21
    
typedef R(C::func*)(A); then use func as template argument. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Dec 15 '10 at 13:23
    
Execuse me, I was wrong. I hadn't seen that C is also comes as template argument. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Dec 15 '10 at 13:25

At first you can write template wrapper:

template < typename C >
class CWrapper
{
 typedef R(C::func*)(A);
 C* realC;
 Cwrapper(C* c):realC(c){}
};

then write you class this way:

template < typename C,
           typename R,
           typename F = C::func >
class MemberFuncPtr{...

then make MemberFuncPtr< CWrapper <C>, R> memFuncPtr;

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1  
Not gonna compile - CWrapper don't know anything about R and A –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 15 '10 at 14:34

Corrected Sad_man's code with some C++0x magic: http://ideone.com/rng6V (probably not gonna work for you, as not many compilers has C++0x :-|)

Works with rvalues and there is example how to achieve what you want with lambda functions.

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I think the link is broken. –  ali_bahoo Dec 15 '10 at 14:49
    
Seems whole ideone.com is currently down. –  Pawel Zubrycki Dec 15 '10 at 15:06

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