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There is a static pointer aSingletonClass *instance_ and a static function void deleteInstance( void ) declared in the Code 1.

I implemented the Code 2 without using a static pointer and static function(i thought Singleton can be achieved without it but I am not sure!!!)

Please advice me whether this change can be hazardous and in which case my program can crash.

Code 1:

class aSingletonClass
{
public:

  static aSingletonClass *getInstance( void )
  {

    if(!instance_)
      instance_ = new aSingletonClass;
    return instance_;
  }

  static void deleteInstance()
  {
    if(instance_)
      delete instance_;
    instance_ = NULL; //important as this can create dead reference problems
  }

private:

  static aSingletonClass *instance_;

  aSingletonClass() {};

  ~aSingletonClass() {};
};

int main()
{
  aSingletonClass *someVar = NULL;

  someVar = aSingletonClass::getInstance();

  aSingletonClass::deleteInstance();

  return 0;
}

Code 2:

class A
{
    int x;
    A(int a)
    { x=a;  }

    ~A()
    { }

public:
     static A* start()
     {
       A* ptr1 = new A(3);
       return (ptr1);
     }


     void end()
     {
       delete this;
     }
};

int main()
{
  A* ptr=A::start();

  ptr->end();
}
share|improve this question
3  
What a mess... I refactored some bits of the question but ugh... –  Matthieu M. Dec 15 '10 at 13:36
1  
Your second implementation is not a Singleton. I advise you search the web for some more information about the pattern, it's limitations and (numerous) implementations. –  Tony Dec 15 '10 at 13:45
1  
If you really feel that you need a singleton, at least make sure it's not copyable (boost::noncopyable, or make copy constructor and assignment operator declarations private and not defined) –  stefaanv Dec 15 '10 at 14:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your code should be like this:

class A    {
  public:
    static A *getInstance( void )
    {
       if(!instance_)
          instance_ = new A();
       return instance_;
    }
    static void deleteInstance()
    {
        if(instance_)
           delete instance_;
        instance_ = NULL; //important as this can create dead reference problems
    }
    static A* start()
    {
        A* ptr1 = A::getInstance();
        ptr1 -> started = true; // check here if A had been started already !!!!
        return (ptr1);
    }

    static void end()
    {
        A* ptr1 = A::getInstance();
        ptr1 -> started = false; // check here if A had ever been started !!!!
        //A::deleteInstance();      // may be it will be useful here
    }
  private:
    bool started = false;
    static A *instance_;
    A() {};
    ~A() {};
};

int main()
{
  A *someVar = NULL;
  someVar = aSingletonClass::getInstance();
  A::deleteInstance();

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Code 2 will not be a singleton. In start() function, you return a pointer to a new A object. But, in the end() function, you delete this object. So, it will not work.

share|improve this answer

Your second version is not a singleton because you have no static A* pointer and just return a new one whenever start() is called, so the following is valid in your code:

int main()
{
    A* ptr = A::start();
    A* ptr2 = A::start();
    A* ptr3 = A::start();
    // etc
    ptr->end();
    ptr2->end();
    ptr3->end();
    return 0;
}; // eo main
share|improve this answer

Ugh. Not a nice way to do singletons!

I would do something like the following..

class A
{
private:
  A() {}

public:

  static A& instance()
  {
    static A _inst;
    return _inst;
  }

};

To use,

A& inst = A::instance()

Will always return the single instance!

EDIT: This approach has several advantages - you don't have to worry about cleaning up but it's lazy loaded (or initialized), and you work with references! Heck you could even have a constant singleton (why, I'm sure you can think of some use! ;) )

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Nim, How about this code..I took the idea from your answer(any difference or impact??) –  user436212 Dec 17 '10 at 6:26
    
But there is a problem in here-Suppose there is another request A& inst2 = A::instance() ...In this case I will get the reference which should have been restricted.!! inst and inst2 are now working on the same object at the same time which might cause error..As per my understanding only when one deletes the instance the other should get the reference.. –  user436212 Dec 17 '10 at 6:51
    
The whole point of a singleton is that a single instance is accessed in many places. I don't understand what you mean in your second point (or what you are asking in your first point). If you have multi-threaded access to the singleton, you have to ensure you lock any relevant methods. If you need to delete the previous instance before the next access, I don't think it's the singleton pattern you need! You seriously need to revisit your design! –  Nim Dec 17 '10 at 22:47

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