Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an abstract class for moving data from one database to another, and sometimes the data required to create the basic entries is different, due to the presence of a legacy table in the destination database which includes instructions for locating the data in the source. Obviously simplified, here is where the problem comes into play:

abstract class foo
{
    protected abstract function createBaseEntry($id);
}

Sometimes, I only need the one ID passed to this function, but in some cases I need to pass two. Of course, if the actual method signature of the concrete method does not match the abstract method PHP will raise a Fatal error and halt execution. Other than predefining with null the maximum number of arguments and modifying every concrete class that extends this one, is there any way to get around this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use func_num_args() and func_get_args() to determine the number of arguments at runtime if you cannot/want not change the method signature to have an optional second argument.

Example

function foo()
{   
    $num  = func_num_args();
    $args = func_get_args();
    var_dump($num, $args);
}

foo(1, 2, 3);   

Output (codepad)

int(3) 
array(3) { [0]=> int(1) [1]=> int(2) [2]=> int(3) } 

This will also work when there are arguments defined in the signature.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think I'm just going to change it to accept a record and then let each implementation determine what to do with/from that record; however, since your suggestion is demonstrably correct I'm going to accept it and move on with my life. Time critical project, can't get all caught up on one detail =) –  Dereleased Dec 15 '10 at 13:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.