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Is there a Python equivalent to Ruby's string interpolation?

Ruby example:

name = "Spongebob Squarepants"
puts "Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? \n#{name}."

Whilst I could succeed using string concatenation in Python, it's seemingly verbose to me coming from Ruby.

Update: The problem was solved using the .format method found in Python 2.6 upwards. This is not the only method however. More are explained eloquently by Sven Marnach.

An example (thanks to EinLama):

"my {0} string: {1}".format("cool", "Hello there!")

Output:

'my cool string: Hello there!"
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The issue here is that name is a local variable lying in the string, and in Python you have to explicitly pass the dictionary of local variables to the string formatter if you want it to use them. –  katrielalex Dec 15 '10 at 14:58
    
This wasn't the original issue, but thanks. Your comment gave me a little better understanding of variable scope (something I'm still gaining ground with). :) –  Caste Dec 15 '10 at 15:00
    
What do you think about this one, then? stackoverflow.com/questions/16504732/… –  Ismael VC May 12 '13 at 12:32

6 Answers 6

up vote 56 down vote accepted

The closest you can get to this is

name = "Spongebob Squarepants"
print "Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? %(name)s." % locals()

The % operator can be used for string interpolation in Python. The first operand is the string to be interpolated, the second can have different types including a "mapping", mapping field names to the values to be interpolated. Here I used the dictionary of local variables locals() to map the field name name to its value as a local variable.

[Edit: The same code using the .format() method of recent Python versions would look like this:

name = "Spongebob Squarepants"
print "Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? {name!s}.".format(**locals())

]

There is also the string.Template class:

tmpl = string.Template("Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? $name.")
print tmpl.substitute(name="Spongebob Squarepants")
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@Caste see here: docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#string-formatting and post a follow up comment if you need any more details –  mikej Dec 15 '10 at 13:59
    
I understand the basic gist of it, I don't fully understand all the additional symbols and text found in the example in the documentation however. Why the use of convert to string here: %(language)s What does the 3 in '03d' signify? Why after the string is there % \? The assignment of variables (if they are in fact variables) after the print expression confuses me also. Sorry if this is a pain! –  Caste Dec 15 '10 at 14:07
1  
The two basic formats used in the example are %s for a string and %03d for a number padded to 3 digits with leading zeroes. It could just be written print "%s has %03d" % ("Python", 2). The example then makes use of putting a mapping key in brackets after the % which is a way of giving the placeholders meaningful names rather than relying on their order in the string. You then pass a dictionary that maps the key names to their values. That's why Sven is using the locals() function which returns a dict containing all your local variables so it will map name to the value of name –  mikej Dec 15 '10 at 14:15
    
The required usage of a conversion type was what first confused me. So, using the documentation terminology. The % starts the specifier. There is no conversion flag for (language), just a conversion type (the trailing 's'); (number) however has one (or two) conversion flags which is '0' (and '3' respectively). The 'd' is the conversion type and signifies it is an integer. Did I understand correctly? –  Caste Dec 15 '10 at 14:32
    
@Caste: Yes, that's basically right. Note that you could always use a s as a conversion type -- Python can convert just about anything to a string. But of course you would lose the special formatting capabilities of other conversion types. –  Sven Marnach Dec 15 '10 at 14:37

Since Python 2.6.X you might want to use:

"my {0} string: {1}".format("cool", "Hello there!")

This goes double for Python 3.X, where the %-syntax is deprecated.

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7  
Note that the % operator for string interpolation is not deprecated in Python 3.x. docs.python.org/dev/py3k/whatsnew/… announces the plan to deprecate % starting in 3.1, but this never happened. –  Sven Marnach Dec 15 '10 at 14:52
3  
%-syntax still lives on in Python 3 (not deprecated as of Python 3.2) –  Corey Goldberg Dec 15 '10 at 17:49

Python's string interpolation is similar to C's printf()

If you try:

name = "SpongeBob Squarepants"
print "Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? %s" % name

The tag %s will be replaced with the name variable. You should take a look to the print function tags: http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html

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I've developed the interpy package, that enables string interpolation in Python.

Just install it via pip install interpy. And then, add the line # coding: interpy at the beginning of your files!

Example:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# coding: interpy

name = "Spongebob Squarepants"
print "Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? \n#{name}."
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import inspect
def s(template, **kwargs):
    "Usage: s(string, **locals())"
    if not kwargs:
        frame = inspect.currentframe()
        try:
            kwargs = frame.f_back.f_locals
        finally:
            del frame
        if not kwargs:
            kwargs = globals()
    return template.format(**kwargs)

Usage:

a = 123
s('{a}', locals()) # print '123'
s('{a}') # it is equal to the above statement: print '123'
s('{b}') # raise an KeyError: b variable not found

PS: performance may be a problem. This is useful for local scripts, not for production logs.

Duplicated:

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You can also have this

name = "Spongebob Squarepants"
print "Who lives in a Pineapple under the sea? \n#{name}.".format(name=name)

http://docs.python.org/2/library/string.html#formatstrings

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