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I am considering a project in which workstations, connected to a central server display various content under the control of a central timeline.

Requirements are that the kiosks could have various compositions of monitor and an extended desktop. This screen space would be use to display images, movies or various mosaics of images and movies.

For example, a machine with 3x3 monitors might be configured to display video in the lowest right four screens, a title on the top three videos and whatnot elsewhere.

I am figuring out how to create the viewer. I think that sticking to web technologies I know well would be good and using JavaScript for the timeline engine sounds easy.

As for codecs and video drivers I think I would stick with Chrome, Css3 and Html5, I think I can require Chrome and Windows 7.

There are a few concerns, though.

Will there be performance problems considering video split on different monitors on an extended desktop?

Will it be pixel predictable to size and stack divs so that images fit inside a physical monitor or monitor group?

Thank you all.

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3 Answers

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Browser shouldn't be a problem at all. Just remember the architecture - you'll need a server somewhere and each kiosk will be a client. Just set up a port/url for your app and there you go. Chrome has some features that allow you to prevent users from exiting the app. I forget the specifics, I believe it involves incognito mode and something

Company I work for does something a lot like this. We make 'apps' that run on iPad and another touch screen device called MSI (btw - one of the advantages here is the freedom of using different client platforms), but not in the typical Objective-C way. Theres a server with a LAMP stack and the client uses the browser.

Will there be performance problems considering video split on different monitors on an extended desktop?

I think more than multiple monitors what you really have is multiple clients. This is interactive to some degree right?

Will it be pixel predictable to size and stack divs so that images fit inside a physical monitor or monitor group?

Yes. I don't really do artsy design and display details so I can't comment on specifics. But I don't think this is too hard - especially if all the clients are similar. Majority of this would be dictated by CSS.

EDIT - took a look a what we do on chrome. between running on start up, using kiosk mode and incognito (both can be runtime flags) and the regular F11 kind of full screen, you should be pretty much there

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No, it is not interactive, think of it as a display of various advertisements and trailers and compositions thereof. The machines will not be visible or operable. –  mico Dec 15 '10 at 16:49
    
oh gotcha. then i guess this could be a single massive client with multiple screens. of course when you've got a client/server setup and only one client that brings up some questions. im like things to be extensible as much as anyone else, but have you considered that maybe all you really need is a slideshow here? –  jon_darkstar Dec 15 '10 at 17:03
    
Well, I am thinking of different clients with multimple monitors and different timelines, each with a possibily different mosaic of images and video. –  mico Dec 15 '10 at 23:30
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A great solution for this is Adobe AIR. You are already talking about HTML, might as well check that out.

The nice thing is that AIR provides facilities for kiosks. Check out this link:

http://www.adobe.com/devnet/flex/articles/flex_kiosk.html

Just replace everything there that says Flex with HTML/Javascript. The platform functionality is available to both technologies.

As for stretching a browser or AIR app across multiple screens, I believe you would have to manually position the window yourself. I.e., if you maximize an app window on a multi-monitor setup, it expands to the size of the monitor only, not the entire viewable area. You likely will have to manually position/resize in Javascript.

As for using Chrome as a client, see this thread:

http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/Chrome/thread?tid=12bde481a208c4ca&hl=en

It doesn't look like Chrome supports a kiosk mode.

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well you can still use HTML/Javascript with jQuery inside AIR. been there, done that. –  mauris Dec 15 '10 at 14:30
    
@thephpdeveloper: Well good for you, Sparky. –  Mike Dec 15 '10 at 14:51
    
Ah, thanks. I have already made an Air application out of an Html application with a certain success. It is also simple to install and update. And BTW it it will be html it will be jQuery, I have a lot of experience with that. –  mico Dec 15 '10 at 16:41
    
It was tough to choose an accepted answer, the one I chose is more on topic, but your answer was inspiring and in fact I think I could really go with Air, since the customer has asked more features, like licensing and protection. –  mico Dec 17 '10 at 21:44
    
Nice link, see also freesoftwaremagazine.com/columns/… Emulating disk menus with HTML5 and Chromium for Lib-Ray –  David d C e Freitas Sep 22 '11 at 20:42
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Will there be performance problems considering video split on different monitors on an extended desktop?

IMHO screen space does take a little toll on your video processing. You will need a relatively good video card to support such huge amount of displays. I am a user of dual screen on ATI Radeon HD 5750 (1GB), and I can do intense gaming on my main screen while read news and be on twitter on my other screen.

Will it be pixel predictable to size and stack divs so that images fit inside a physical monitor or monitor group?

DIVs can be easily styled and positioned using CSS. You can define the number of pixels for both width and height. And if you do your storyboarding and layout design, everything should fit in your window.

However the trouble for you is that I assume you're stretching the browser window across the 3x3 screen. I recommend you to instead have one browser window per display.

I've tried that Chrome can full screen on each display without exiting-full-screen-mode on the others.

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