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I am a beginner in perl. I have a text file with text similar to as below. i need to extract VALUE="<NEEDED VALUE>". Say for SPINACH, i should be getting SALAD alone.

How to use perl regex to get the value. i need to parse multiple lines to get it. ie between each #ifonly --- #endifonly

$cat check.txt

while (<$file>)
{
   if (m/#ifonly .+ SPINACH .+ VALUE=(")([\w]*)(") .+ #endifonly/g)
{
    my $chosen = $2;
   }
}


#ifonly APPLE CARROT SPINACH
VALUE="SALAD" REQUIRED="yes" 
QW RETEWRT OIOUR
#endifonly
#ifonly APPLE MANGO ORANGE CARROT
VALUE="JUICE" REQUIRED="yes" 
as df fg
#endifonly
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

while (<DATA>) {
   my $rc = /#ifonly .+ SPINACH/ .. (my ($value) = /VALUE="([^"]*)"/);
   next unless $rc =~ /E0$/;
   say $value;
}

__DATA__
#ifonly APPLE CARROT SPINACH
VALUE="SALAD" REQUIRED="yes" 
QW RETEWRT OIOUR
#endifonly
#ifonly APPLE MANGO ORANGE CARROT
VALUE="JUICE" REQUIRED="yes" 
as df fg
#endifonly

This uses a small trick described by brian d foy here. As the link describes, it uses the scalar range operator / flipflop.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, somewhat shorter: next unless (/#ifonly .+ SPINACH/ .. (my ($value) = /VALUE="([^"]*)"/)) =~ /E0$/; But frankly, it breaks my indent, so I wouldn't use it. : ) There's also quite a bit going on there, which may not be the best for maintainability. –  Hugmeir Dec 15 '10 at 15:20
    
Pretty cool approach, and (once more) the link you posted has taught me something, so thanks for that! –  canavanin Dec 15 '10 at 15:30
    
@canavanin I have the links. All of them! You are welcome - the Effective Perler is my favorite Perl blog, so it's always a pleasure to direct people there. –  Hugmeir Dec 15 '10 at 15:38

In case your file is very big (or you want to read it line by line for some other reason) you could do it as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my ($file, $keyword);

# now get command line options (see Usage note below)
GetOptions(
            "f=s" => \$file,
            "k=s" => \$keyword,
          );

# if either the file or the keyword has not been provided, display a
# help text and exit
if (! $file || ! $keyword) {
   print STDERR<<EOF;

   Usage: script.pl -f filename -k keyword

EOF
   exit(1);
}

my $found;         # indicator that the keyword has been found
my $returned_word; # will store the word you want to retrieve

open FILE, "<$file" or die "Cannot open file '$file': $!";
while (<FILE>) {
   if (/$keyword/) {
      $found = 1;
   }

   # the following condition will be true between all lines that
   # start with '#ifonly' or '#endifonly' - but only if the keyword 
   # has been found!
   if (/^#ifonly/ .. /^#endifonly/ && $found) {
      if (/VALUE="(\w+)"/) { 
         $returned_word = $1;
         print "looking for $keyword --> found $returned_word\n";

         last; # if you want to get ALL values after the keyword
               # remove the 'last' statement, as it makes the script
               # exit the while loop
      }
   }
}
close FILE;
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You can read the file contents in a string and then search for the pattern in the string:

my $file;    
$file.=$_ while(<>);    
if($file =~ /#ifonly.+?\bSPINACH\b.+?VALUE="(\w*)".+?#endifonly/s) {
        print $1;
}

Your original regex needs some tweaking:

  • You need to make your quantifiers non-greedy.
  • Use the s modifier to make . match newline as-well.

Ideone Link

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Here's another answer based on the flip-flop operator:

use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

while (<$file>)
{
  if ( (/^#ifonly.*\bSPINACH\b/ .. /^#endifonly/) &&
       (my ($chosen) = /^VALUE="(\w+)"/) )
  {
    say $chosen;
  }
}

This solution applies the second test to all of the lines in the range. The trick @Hugmeir used to exclude the start and end lines isn't needed because the "inner" regex, /^VALUE="(\w+)"/, can never match them anyway (I added the ^ anchor to all regexes to make doubly sure of that).

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These two lines in one answer given two days ago

my $file;
$file.=$_ while(<>);

are not very efficient. Perl will likely read the file in big chunks, break those chunks into lines of text for the <> and then the .= will join those lines back to make a big string. It would be more efficient to slurp the file. The basic style is to alter \$ the input record separator.

undef $/;
$file = <>;

The module File::Slurp; (see perldoc File::Slurp) may be even better.

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