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I'm writing a Snake program in C++ (visualisation with JNI) and valid movement buttons are either left (move 90° counter-clockwise) or right (move 90° clockwise).

In every loop of the game loop I retrieve a key event from a GUI interface and move my snake according to that key event, this is how i do this:

if(key_event != NULL){
    if(key_event == LEFT){
        if(moveDirection == UP || moveDirection == DOWN){
            moveDirection = LEFT;
            (moveDirection == UP) ? /*change turn after head*/ : /*change turn after head*/;
        } //else if (moveDir == LEFT || RIGHT)
    } //else if (key_event == RIGHT)
    //...
}

The if with: /*change turn after head*/ is because if the snake is moving down and goes left there is another graphic for the turn then when it's going up and goes left.

This leads to a lot of if-statements and is not very readible, so I'm wondering if there's a general way to solve nested if-statements like this.

EDIT:
key_event and moveDirection are enums.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I would personally have another function to apply the move.

if(key_event != NULL){
    if(key_event == LEFT){
       moveLeft();
    }
    ...
}

void moveLeft()
{
  switch(moveDirection)
  {
    case UP:
    case DOWN:
      moveDirection = LEFT;
      break;
    case ...
  }
}

I use switch case, in my opinion it is more read-able for this example rather than if.. else if.. else if...

The point is, when you have nested loops, see if you can break some of it into a function to simplify the problem.

I hope this helps.

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Basically this is a combination of walkingTarget and Mark B's answers, this should definitely improve readibility, thanks! –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:15

It feels like Finite State Machine is what you need here. You can define keys as events, snake positions as states and describe transitions from one state into another depending on the event (what key pressed). That will pretty much solve the problem and use transition table instead of nested if statements and make your implementation less error prone. Boost Statechart Library can help you implement it quickly.

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I've never heard of this before, it looks very interesting and definitly worth trying out, perhaps a little bit overkill for this project. The problem is this is part of an assignment and we're only allowed to use standard libraries and already given header files. I will definitly check this out for other projects! –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:13

Most likely the code will be more readable if you factor sections of the if checks into functions. Without seeing the full context of the work being done it's hard to say for sure, but something like get_new_direction(event, direction) would probably be a good start. When the components of the if checks are well named functions it will help both readability and also possibly nesting levels.

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I'm wondering why i haven't thought of that! Will definitely be using this, in combination with raRaRa's answer, thanks! –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:18

A simple lookup table could help:

enum dir { UP, RIGHT, DOWN, LEFT };

dir lturn[] = {LEFT, UP, RIGHT, DOWN};
dir rturn[] = {RIGHT, DOWN, LEFT, UP};

so that you can write

dir curr_dir;
if (moveDirection == LEFT)
    curr_dir = lturn[curr_dir];
if (moveDirection == RIGHT)
    curr_dir = rturn[curr_dir];
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If your key_event is an int or char, you can use a switch statement which might be more readable.

if (moveDirection == UP || moveDirection == DOWN)
{
    switch (key_event)
    {
        case LEFT:
            //Turn snake left
            break;
        case RIGHT:
            //Turn snake right
            break;
        default:
            //Invalid turn, do nothing
            break;
    }
}
else if (moveDirection == LEFT || moveDirection == RIGHT)
{
    switch (key_event)
    {
        case UP:
            //Turn snake up
            break;
        case DOWN:
            //Turn snake down
            break;
        default:
            //Invalid turn, do nothing
            break;
    }
}
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It is indeed an int, i'm surprised since my professor said that enums were stand-alone types in C++, not like in C were they're basically ints. Will be using this in combination with raRaRa's answer, thanks! –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:17

Well, obviously you could eliminate the first "if" with something like this:

if( keyEvent == null )
return;

Next, use something like this:

Action defaultAction = TurnLeftAction;
if( keyEvent == Up )
  defaultAction = TurnUpAction;
else if( keyEvent == Down)
 defaultAction = TurnDownAction;
else
 defaultAction = TurnRightAction;

defaultAction.Execute();

I hope you catched the idea :)

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I like how to eliminate the first if, i can't do that though because there's a chunk of code below it, that would be skipped. (i could put all the if-statements in a new method and then i would be able to do this) Nice idea though! –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:25

You could do this with objects:

class MoveState {
    public:
        MoveState* getNextState(MoveDirection change);
        GraphicsStuff* getDirectionChangeGraphics(MoveDirection change);
        void setNextState(MoveDirection change, MoveState* nextState, GraphicsStuff* graphics);
}

Then you have either instances of MoveState representing each direction of movement. Your outer code can then be:

MoveState STATES[4];

void init() {
    STATES[UP].setNextState(LEFT, &STATES[LEFT], whatever);
    STATES[UP].setNextState(RIGHT, &STATES[RIGHT], whatever);
    STATES[DOWN].setNextState(LEFT, &STATES[RIGHT], whatever);
    STATES[DOWN].setNextState(RIGHT, &STATES[LEFT], whatever);
    ...
}

void handleInput() {
    ...
    if(key_event != NULL){
        MoveDirection change = convertEventToDirection(key_event);
        MoveState* nextState = currentState->getNextState(change);
        if (nextState != NULL) {
            drawCoolGraphics(currentState->getDirectionChangeGraphics(change);
            currentState = nextState;
        }
    }
}

You could also do it by subclassing MoveState for each direction of movement. It depends on where you want to put your code and how extendable it needs to be. Subclassing is more flexible but may be overkill in this case.

This should be less error prone because you can unit test each instance of MoveState much more easily than a big if-then-else or switch statement.

EDIT: Heh. This is basically a less concise version of what @Vlad suggested.

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I think this is a very general approach to a problem like this and, i would need to study it a bit more but i'll probably try implementing it the way you say, as an exercise for myself. Thanks for the contribution! –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:23

I would recommend representing the direction of the snake as a vector, the four directions being (1 0) - right, (-1 0) - left, (0 1) - up and (0 -1) down. This would eliminate most switches in your program, since making the snake move is handled by simple math, rather than by mapping arbitrary enum values to movement.

struct Vector2D 
{ 
    int x, y; 
    Vector2D(int x, int y); 
    ... 
};

Then turning left and right becomes:

Vector2D turn_left(Vector2D direction)
{
    return Vector2D(-direction.y, direction.x);
}

Vector2D turn_right(Vector2D direction)
{
    return Vector2D(direction.y, -direction.x);
}

And the keys would be handled by:

if (key_event == LEFT) snake_direction = turn_left(snake_direction);
else if (key_event == RIGHT) snake_direction = turn_right(snake_direction);
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While that would also be my approach, i can't implement that because this is part of an assignment. In this assignment we're given fixed header files and restrictions (which IMO takes away the trail-and-error and logics we would have to go through to solve this problem) we have to implement. My snake works and if i ever feel like optimizing this in my free time i'll give this approach a shot :). –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 19:52

You could use a jump table, assuming that key events start from zero and are an integral type, and that this function is non-static. However it's quite a lot of semantic overhead, as well as both time and space. and a good switch-case is likely the genuinely simplest option.

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I'll be using the switch-case for now since - as you mentioned - it is the simplest option which gives me enough readibility. –  Aerus Dec 15 '10 at 15:28

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