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Is it safe to keep the user password hash for example md5 in session ?

UPDATE: i wanna use this hash for farther authorization of ajax requests that asks the user password, I got a key too but i have to check the password too.

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3  
Why do you need to keep such information in the session ? Once the user is authenticated, you don't need to revalidate who he is. – HoLyVieR Dec 15 '10 at 15:12
    
for farther ajax validation. – user529649 Dec 15 '10 at 15:13

It should be safe, since a client can only access his own session values. But you should:

  1. make sure the client cannot access it
  2. use another encryption, I wouldn't consider md5 safe, better use SHA-512 or something else.

But most importantly: Do you really need the hash in your session? If the user has been authenticated, he will always receive the same session (if your server is configured correctly). If you are anxious about session hijacking, you are going down the wrong path.

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There is one thing that you have to keep in mind is that session are usually stored on the hardriver on which your server runs. If someone can gain unauthorized access to any file on your server, those hashes can be compromise.

Wheter this risk is acceptable, depends on what you are developping.

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Where do he get that password hash? Must be from server hdd too. :) – VOX Dec 15 '10 at 15:34
    
@VOX usually password hashes are stored on database, which I can assume is located on an other server that has more restricted access to it. If his database is located on the same server, that's an other problem too. – HoLyVieR Dec 15 '10 at 15:36

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