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Basically I have a program which, when it starts loads a list of files (as FileInfo) and for each file in the list it loads a XML document (as XDocument).

The program then reads data out of it into a container class (storing as IEnumerables), at which point the XDocument goes out of scope.

The program then exports the data from the container class to a database. After the export the container class goes out of scope, however, the garbage collector isn't clearing up the container class which, because its storing as IEnumerable, seems to lead to the XDocument staying in memory (Not sure if this is the reason but the task manager is showing the memory from the XDocument isn't being freed).

As the program is looping through multiple files eventually the program is throwing a out of memory exception. To mitigate this ive ended up using

System.GC.Collect(); 

to force the garbage collector to run after the container goes out of scope. this is working but my questions are:

  • Is this the right thing to do? (Forcing the garbage collector to run seems a bit odd)
  • Is there a better way to make sure the XDocument memory is being disposed?
  • Could there be a different reason, other than the IEnumerable, that the document memory isnt being freed?

Thanks.


Edit: Code Samples:

  • Container Class:

    public IEnumerable<CustomClassOne> CustomClassOne { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<CustomClassTwo> CustomClassTwo { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<CustomClassThree> CustomClassThree { get; set; }
    ...
    public IEnumerable<CustomClassNine> CustomClassNine { get; set; }
    
  • Custom Class:

    public long VariableOne { get; set; }
    public int VariableTwo { get; set; }
    public DateTime VariableThree { get; set; }
    ...
    

    Anyway that's the basic structures really. The Custom Classes are populated through the container class from the XML document. The filled structures themselves use very little memory.

A container class is filled from one XML document, goes out of scope, the next document is then loaded e.g.

    public static void ExportAll(IEnumerable<FileInfo> files)
    {
        foreach (FileInfo file in files)
        {
            ExportFile(file);
            //Temporary to clear memory
            System.GC.Collect();
        }
    }
    private static void ExportFile(FileInfo file)
    {
        ContainerClass containerClass = Reader.ReadXMLDocument(file);
        ExportContainerClass(containerClass);
        //Export simply dumps the data from the container class into a database
        //Container Class (and any passed container classes) goes out of scope at end of export
    }

    public static ContainerClass ReadXMLDocument(FileInfo fileToRead)
    {
        XDocument document = GetXDocument(fileToRead);
        var containerClass = new ContainerClass();

        //ForEach customClass in containerClass
        //Read all data for customClass from XDocument

        return containerClass;
    }

Forgot to mention this bit (not sure if its relevent), the files can be compressed as .gz so I have the GetXDocument() method to load it

    private static XDocument GetXDocument(FileInfo fileToRead)
    {
        XDocument document;

        using (FileStream fileStream = new FileStream(fileToRead.FullName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read))
        {
            if (String.Equals(fileToRead.Extension, ".gz", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            {
                using (GZipStream zipStream = new GZipStream(fileStream, CompressionMode.Decompress))
                {
                    document = XDocument.Load(zipStream);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                document = XDocument.Load(fileStream);
            }
            return document;
        }
    }

Hope this is enough information. Thanks

Edit: The System.GC.Collect() is not working 100% of the time, sometimes the program seems to retain the XDocument, anyone have any idea why this might be?

public static ContainerClass ReadXMLDocument(FileInfo fileToRead)
{
    XDocument document = GetXDocument(fileToRead);
    var containerClass = new ContainerClass();

    //ForEach customClass in containerClass
    //Read all data for customClass from XDocument

    containerClass.CustomClassOne = document.Descendants(ElementName)
        .DescendantsAndSelf(ElementChildName)
        .Select(a => ExtractDetails(a));

    return containerClass;
}

private static CustomClassOne ExtractDetails(XElement itemElement)
{
    var customClassOne = new CustomClassOne();
    customClassOne.VariableOne = Int64.Parse(itemElement.Attribute("id").Value.Substring(4));
    customClassOne.VariableTwo = int.Parse(itemElement.Element(osgb + "version").Value);
    customClassOne.VariableThree = DateTime.ParseExact(itemElement.Element(osgb + "versionDate").Value,
            "yyyy-MM-dd", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    return customClassOne;
}
share|improve this question
9  
I'd recommend against calling the GC manually. Can we see some example code so we can understand what it is doing? – Matthew Abbott Dec 15 '10 at 16:54
    
I'd suggest that things are not going out of scope when you think they do. Your IEnumerable will have references (to support lazy evaluation) to stuff you are no longer directly referencing elsewhere. So long as you are referencing the IEnumerable all that it enumerates still exists. – Colin Mackay Dec 15 '10 at 17:30
    
@Matthew: Will add some example code tommorow as i dont have access to it at the moment. @Colin: Surely if its not out of scope when i think it is manually calling the garbage collector wouldnt do anything? – Manatherin Dec 15 '10 at 18:10
1  
@Manatherin: also, keep in mind that IEnumerable<T> inherits IDisposable, so you might want to call Dispose on those objects, or put them into a using block. – John Saunders Jan 4 '11 at 19:09
2  
@John: Actually IEnumerable<T> doesn't implement IDisposable, but IEnumerator<T> does. Unless he's calling GetEnumerator directly, there's nothing to dispose. – Josh Jan 11 '11 at 1:33
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your code doesn't look bad to me and I don't see any single reason for forcing collection. If your custom class holds a reference to XElements from XDocument then GC will not collect neither them nor the doc itself. If something else is holding references to your enumerables then they won't be collected either. So I'd really like to see your custom class definition and how it's populated.

share|improve this answer
    
Have added a example of how data is being pulled out, there is one customclass where it pulls out a xelement (or did its been changed recently) where in a ExtractDetails method it would be something like, CustomClassX.XElementVariable = itemElement.Element(ElementName), could this have been keeping a reference and causing the problems? – Manatherin Jan 11 '11 at 9:50
    
If you indeed have CustomClassX.XElementVariable = itemElement.Element(ElementName) line somewhere in CurtomClassX then yes, it creates a reference to XElement that belongs to XDocument. You may have to copy that if you need it. – Schultz9999 Jan 11 '11 at 16:23
    
Although I am still puzzled by the fact you are running of memory by simply parsing XML. You may need/have to consider restructuring your app so that it wouldn't read so much data. – Schultz9999 Jan 11 '11 at 16:26
    
Well after switching that code out it does seem to be managing the memory much better so I think that may have been the issue so am going to mark this as the answer, I'm sorry I cant give the bounty thought as it expired – Manatherin Jan 11 '11 at 16:32
1  
No worries :) Glad to be helpful. – Schultz9999 Jan 11 '11 at 17:58

Forcing a manual garbage collection might appear to have solved your problem in some cases, but it's a pretty sure bet that this is nothing better than coincidence.

What you need to do is to stop guessing about what is causing your memory pressure problems, and to instead find out for sure.

I've used JetBrains dotTrace to very good effect in similar situations - set a breakpoint, trigger the profiler and browse through a view of all the "live" objects and their relationships. Makes it easy to find which objects are still retained, and by which references they're kept live.

While I haven't used it myself, the RedGate Ants Memory Profiler is also recommended by many.

Both of these tools have free trials, which should be enough to solve your current problem. Though, I'd strongly suggest that it's worth buying one or the other - dotTrace has saved me dozens of hours of troubleshooting memory issues, a very worthwhile ROI.

share|improve this answer

Your inclination about calling GC.Collect is correct. Needing to call this method is an indication that something else is wrong with your code.

However, there are a few things about your statements that make me think your understanding of memory is a little off. Task manager is a very poor indicator of how much memory your program is actually using; a profiler is much better for this task. As far as memory goes, if it can be collected, the GC will collect the memory when it is needed.

Although it's a bit of a wording detail, you ask how "to make sure the XDocument memory is being disposed." Disposed is typically used to refer to manually releasing unmanaged resources, such as database connections or file handles; the GC collects memory.

Now to try to answer the actual question. It is very easy to have references to objects that you do not release, especially when using lambdas and LINQ. Things typed as IEnumerable are especially prone to this as the lazily-evaluated LINQ functions will almost always introduce references to objects you think are otherwise unused. The ReadXMLDocument code that you omitted may be a good place to start looking.

Another possibility is something along the line of what TomTom suggested in that the database classes you are using may be storing objects that you did not expect for its own reasons.

share|improve this answer

If processed XML files are too big (around 500-800M) than you cannot use XDocument (or XmlDocument either) because it will try to load the whole document in memory. See this discussion: Does LINQ handle large XML files? Getting OutOfMemoryException

In this case, you should rather use a XStreamingElement Class and build your ContainerClass from it.

Maybe going to a 64-bit process would help, but the best practise is always to use streaming from end to end.

share|improve this answer
    
At the moment I am running it on a 64bit processor, whilst I agree loading large files with XDocument is not ideal most of my files are much smaller and the program is capable of handling all the files (it has multiple times, run through every document successfully) the problem only occurs when the documents aren't unloaded properally – Manatherin Jan 5 '11 at 11:54
    
@Manatherin - Even if only some files are big, that can be enough to kill the memory. What do you mean by "non unloaded properly"? – Simon Mourier Jan 5 '11 at 14:44
    
The problem I've been having, as stated in the OP, is that sometimes the memory used by the XDocument isn't being freed when the Document (and Enumerables from it) go out of scope causing the out of memory exception – Manatherin Jan 5 '11 at 15:30
    
@Manatherin - Well, of course you shouldn't keep any reference, in the ContainerClass instance, to the XDocument/XNode, etc... once you've used them, to make sure they are collected when ReadXMLDocument finishes. But if you've done that, then you just have a "normal" OutOfMemory issue, because these classes XDocument/XElement, etc. have no holds on IDisposable resources. It's not because IEnumerable<T> implements IDisposable that it means it really has something unmanaged behind. – Simon Mourier Jan 5 '11 at 16:24

It is not really answer, more investigation suggestion: if GC.Collect does not help that pretty much mean you still keep references to the objects somewhere. Look for singletons and caches that may keep refrences.

If you realiably get the exception or can collect memory dump you can use WinDbg+Sos to find who holds refrences to objects: search for "memory leaks sos windbg" to find details.

share|improve this answer

Anyway, use

String.Equals(fileToRead.Extension, ".gz", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)

instead

String.Compare()
share|improve this answer

You can try to force evaluation with tolist:

public static ContainerClass ReadXMLDocument(FileInfo fileToRead) 
{     
  XDocument document = GetXDocument(fileToRead);     
  var containerClass = new ContainerClass();      
  //ForEach customClass in containerClass     
  //Read all data for customClass from XDocument      
  containerClass.CustomClassOne = document.Descendants(ElementName)
    .DescendantsAndSelf(ElementChildName)         
    .Select(a => ExtractDetails(a)).ToList();      
  return containerClass; 
} 
share|improve this answer

The program then exports the data from the container class to a database. After the export the container class goes out of scope, however, the garbage collector isn't clearing up the container class which, because its storing as IEnumerable, seems to lead to the XDocument staying in memory (Not sure if this is the reason but the task manager is showing the memory from the XDocument isn't being freed).

The reason is that LYNC stored EVERY ITEM READ in it's own reference pool for the transaction. Basiaclly it does so so taht on a reread it can unique the item.

Suggestion:

  • Load only primry keys into an array. COmmit.

  • Walk over list and process items one at a time, commiting after each.

share|improve this answer
    
I am having the exact same problem as Manatherin in my code but I don't understand your answer, can you elaborate more? – Scott Chamberlain Dec 15 '10 at 16:58
4  
LYNC ??? WTF O_O ? – digEmAll Dec 15 '10 at 16:58
1  
-1: I don't understand everything you're saying, but the part I understand is incorrect. – John Saunders Jan 4 '11 at 19:10
2  
LINQ to SQL != LINQ to Objects != LINQ to XML. Common syntax doesn't require common implementation. – Bevan Jan 9 '11 at 21:11

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