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I am trying to create a Table in Oracle and getting the error : ORA-00904: : invalid identifier

Here is my command. I really can't see any problem in it. Please help me to identify the error. Thanks.

CREATE TABLE Sale (
CustomerId INT NOT NULL ,
BarCode INT NOT NULL ,
SalesId INT NOT NULL ,
Date DATE NULL ,
CheckOut TINYINT(1) NULL ,
PRIMARY KEY (CustomerId, BarCode, SalesId) ,
CONSTRAINT fk_Customer_has_Product_Customer
FOREIGN KEY (CustomerId )
REFERENCES Customer (CustomerId )
ON DELETE NO ACTION
ON UPDATE NO ACTION,
CONSTRAINT fk_Customer_has_Product_Product1
FOREIGN KEY (BarCode )
REFERENCES Product (BarCode )
ON DELETE NO ACTION
ON UPDATE NO ACTION);
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2  
Could it be that you're trying to create a column named Date, which is a reserved word? What happens if you use a different name or put quotes around the column name? –  Joe Dec 15 '10 at 17:07
3  
That will certainly cause another problem. But don't put quotes around it, rename it. Once you put quotes around it you are stuck with referencing it in quotes case-sensitively forever: select "Date" from sale... –  Tony Andrews Dec 15 '10 at 17:15
2  
How about removing constraints and columns from your statement one at a time until you figure out which one causes the error? –  Dave Costa Dec 15 '10 at 18:34
    
@Dave - oh yes, old-fashioned debugging, there's a thought! –  Tony Andrews Dec 16 '10 at 9:18
    
Along with those issues, note that Oracle will convert your names to upper case. So SalesID will be SALESID. If you want SalesId to be the actual name, you'll need to double-quote it as "SalesId". Everyplace, as Tony mentioned. That's a pain, which is why most Oracle naming I've seen uses the underscore convention, with names like SALES_ID. –  Jim Hudson Dec 17 '10 at 14:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As previously mentioned, change "DATE" to something more descriptive and not reserved. also, it seems TINYINT does not work in a table create so change that to NUMBER(1), as well as Tony's correct suggestion of reducing the name size (<=30 chrs)

CREATE TABLE Sale
(
    CustomerId INT NOT NULL                    ,
    BarCode    INT NOT NULL                    ,
    SalesId    INT NOT NULL                    ,
    SaleDate DATE NULL                    , --DATE is reserved, changed to SaleDate
    CheckOut number(1) NULL               , --tinyint(1) did not work so changed to number(1)
    PRIMARY KEY( CustomerId, BarCode, SalesId )     ,
    CONSTRAINT fk_SaleCustCusID FOREIGN KEY( CustomerId ) REFERENCES Customer( CustomerId ) ON
    DELETE NO ACTION ON
    UPDATE NO ACTION,
    CONSTRAINT fk_SaleCustBarCode FOREIGN KEY( BarCode ) REFERENCES Product( BarCode ) ON
    DELETE NO ACTION ON
    UPDATE NO ACTION
);
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Same problem here. I tried using date as a column name. I wonder why Oracle is so fussy about this, while MSSQL and MYSql accept it without complaining ? –  sweet dreams Aug 8 '12 at 21:24

The maximum length for an Oracle identifier is 30 characters. These exceed that, are 32 chars long:

  • fk_Customer_has_Product_Customer
  • fk_Customer_has_Product_Product1

See Schema Object Naming Rules

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