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I am trying to get a layout that has no scrollbars and has a fixed header div(height 150px) and then below that a div that fills the rest of the page (will be a google map).

The problem

The map extend down below the bottom of the view-port and I get a scrollbar.

I am looking for a CSS only solution.

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="header"></div>
    <div id="map"></div>
</div>

CSS

#container
{
    position:relative;
    height:100%;
    min-height:100%;
    width:100%;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
#map
{
    position:absolute;
    top:150px;
    width:100%;
    height:100%;
    background-color:#bb3311;
}
#header
{
    height:150px;
    position:absolute;
    width:100%;
    background-color:#00ffbb;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
* { padding: 0; margin: 0;} /* do not use universal selector this is just for example */
#container{
    position: relative;
    height: 100%;
    width: 100%;
    background: yellow;
}

#map {
    position: absolute;
    top: 150px;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    background: red;
    overflow: hidden;
}

#header {
    height: 150px;
    background: green;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="container">
    <div id="header"></div>
    <div id="map"></div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Add overflow hidden where needed.

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty sure this won't work in IE 6 (7 or 8 I am not sure, but doubtful) – Adam Raney Dec 15 '10 at 18:42
    
If you care about IE 6 check this out: alistapart.com/articles/conflictingabsolutepositions From mentioned article: "In all browsers except for IE5 and IE6 1. A div is rectangular. 2. All four corners of a div can be absolutely positioned on a page. 3. If the location of diagonally opposing corners has been determined the width and height is implied." – Ivan Ivanić Dec 16 '10 at 5:51

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