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I need to format both date and time in a tableView:cellForRowAtIndexPath:. Since creating an NSDateFormatter is a fairly heavy operation, I've made them static. Is this the best approach to formatting a date and time on a per-row basis?

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView 
         cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {

    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"Cell";
    MyCell*cell = (MyCell*)[self.tableView
                                dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier
                                                     forIndexPath:indexPath];

    static NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = nil;
    if (!dateFormatter)
    {
       dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
       [dateFormatter setLocale:[NSLocale currentLocale]];
       [dateFormatter setDateStyle:NSDateFormatterLongStyle];
    }
    cell.dateLabel = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:note.timestamp];


     static NSDateFormatter *timeFormatter = nil;
     if (!timeFormatter)
     {
        timeFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
        [timeFormatter setTimeStyle:NSDateFormatterShortStyle];
      }    
      cell.timeLabel = [timeFormatter stringFromDate:note.timestamp];

return cell;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I wouldn't use a static variable, because then you'll almost certainly end up with a memory leak. Instead, I would use two NSDateFormatter * instance variables or properties on that controller object that are instantiated only on demand. When the view unloads or the controller is deallocated, you can then release them.

For example:

@interface MyViewController : UITableViewController {
    NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter;
    NSDateFormatter *timeFormatter;
}

@end

@implementation MyViewController
- (void)viewDidUnload {
    // release date and time formatters, since the view is no longer in memory
    [dateFormatter release]; dateFormatter = nil;
    [timeFormatter release]; timeFormatter = nil;
    [super viewDidUnload];
}

- (void)dealloc {
    // release date and time formatters, since this view controller is being
    // destroyed
    [dateFormatter release]; dateFormatter = nil;
    [timeFormatter release]; timeFormatter = nil;
    [super dealloc];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    // ...

    // if a date formatter doesn't exist yet, create it
    if (!dateFormatter) {
        dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
        [dateFormatter setLocale:[NSLocale currentLocale]];
        [dateFormatter setDateStyle:NSDateFormatterLongStyle];
    }

    cell.dateLabel = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:note.timestamp];

    // if a time formatter doesn't exist yet, create it
    if (!timeFormatter) {
        timeFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
        [timeFormatter setTimeStyle:NSDateFormatterShortStyle];
    }

    cell.timeLabel = [timeFormatter stringFromDate:note.timestamp];
    return cell;
}

@end
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1  
Why would using static vars cause a memory leak? Can you please elaborate on your suggested solution? I'm not really following your approach. –  Michael G. Emmons Dec 15 '10 at 19:30
    
@Harkonian Using static variables would cause a memory leak because you would have no way to free the date formatters once you're done using them. Even if your table view is only seen once, its date formatters would be hanging around for the rest of the application lifetime. I'll edit my answer to include some sample code for a view controller. –  Justin Spahr-Summers Dec 15 '10 at 20:02
    
Not sure that a variable that we want to have and use, and have a reference to, is a memory leak per se. –  QED Apr 27 '13 at 14:57
    
@psoft Assumably the view or VC using it won't always be on screen, though. It could be considered a leak during the period when it's not. –  Justin Spahr-Summers Apr 27 '13 at 17:45

I've read in various places that if you are using NSDateFormatter a lot, you should set up a static variable, but in testing this method I found it used up a lot more memory.

But in your code you don't use static variables for your formatters. Try the following modification:

static NSDateFormatter *dateFormatter = nil;
if (!dateFormatter){
    dateFormatter = [[NSDateFormatter alloc] init];
    [dateFormatter setLocale:[NSLocale currentLocale]];
    [dateFormatter setDateStyle:NSDateFormatterLongStyle];
}
cell.dateLabel = [dateFormatter stringFromDate:note.timestamp];
// And same approach for timeFormatter

This may not save you memory (as your 2 formatter instances will hand during all run-time period), but creating formatter is heavy operation itself so this approach significantly improves your method performance

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You can use this to handle reuse of NSDateFormatter's: https://github.com/DougFischer/DFDateFormatterFactory#readme

P.S: Since you set only format and locale to your data formatters.

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