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Once again looking for some help with PHP security and a login system. Wondering if i did this correctly here. If i wasn't specific enough anywhere please ask, Any help is greatly appreciated. I am trying to create a secure login system, just for purposes of learning. here is the code:

require("constants.php");
$DBH = new mysqli($dbhost, $dbuser, $dbpass, $dbname);

function createSalt() {
    $length = mt_rand(64, 128);
    $salt = '';
    for ($i = 0; $i < $length; $i++) {
        $salt .= chr(mt_rand(33, 255));
    }
    return $salt;
}
//Salt function created by ircmaxell

function registerNewUser() {
    //Check to see if     Username Is In Use//
    $q = $DBH->prepare("SELECT id FROM users WHERE username = ?"); 
    $username = filter_var($username, FILTER_SANITIZE_STRING);
    $data = array($username);
    $q->execute($data);
    $row = $q->fetch();

    if ($row === false) { 
        //If Username Is Not Already In Use Insert Data//
        $hash = hash('sha256', $pass);
        $salt = createSalt();
        $hash = hash('sha256', $salt . $hash . $pass);  //UPDATED
        $data = array($username, $hash, $salt);
        $qInsert = $DBH->prepare(
            "INSERT INTO users (username, password, salt) values (?, ?, ?)"
        );
        $qInsert->execute($data); //Inserts User Data Into Table//  
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Searching PHP.net, I don't find a function named "canonicalize()" Is this a user defined function that's not included in the code? –  Brian H Dec 15 '10 at 19:12
1  
Also, the bind_param() is called with "i" as the variable, yet "i" isn't defined in your prepared statement. You can just pass a the username variable as a single member array to the execute statement and skip the bind_param(). –  Brian H Dec 15 '10 at 19:16
    
yeah i see that canonicalize() is not a function, i thought i had read that it was a function. Guess not. thanks, As for the variable, thanks for that too. Ill edit it. Thanks for the help! –  mcbeav Dec 15 '10 at 19:44
    
ok its been updated to fix the variable issue. Although, I am relatively new to PHP, so does that look right? –  mcbeav Dec 15 '10 at 19:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That looks good so far. I have three suggestions, though:

  1. Choose a longer salt
  2. Don't store salt and password digest separately
  3. If your database connection is not to localhost use a different database connector: PDO doesn't (yet) support SSL connections

EDIT: Also, validate the input a client provides as a "username". But since your code sample is just an excerpt I guess you're doing that.

EDIT #2: When I said, "don't store salt and password separately" I meant incorporating the salt into the stored password hash. Since the hash algorithm of your choice produces quite a long string (64 character) composed of [0-9a-f] you might want to contemplate generating a salt of random length (credits to ircmaxell here) and either concatenate that to the beginning or end of the password hash. So you'll end up storing variable length values (96 - 128 characters) worth of meaninglessness (to outsiders):

$hash = hash('sha256', $pass);
$salt = substr(hash('sha256', mt_rand(0, 1337)), mt_rand(0, 31), 32);
$hash = $salt . hash('sha256', $salt . $hash . $pass);
share|improve this answer
1  
As for prepared statement support (which is a Good Thing), I use PHP's mysqli extension. As for the variables: I'm personally a fan of readable code. So: no. It's better to be able to read code instead of having to decipher it, because you're accessing $_POST['foo'][0] for the 10th time. –  Linus Kleen Dec 15 '10 at 19:15
2  
+1 for longer salt. I personally like using a variable length (chosen at random) between 64 and 128 characters... –  ircmaxell Dec 15 '10 at 19:22
1  
@ircmaxell Thanks. That's also very confusing for people trying to brute force your hashes if $%&# has hit the fan and they got a hold of your MySQL dumps... –  Linus Kleen Dec 15 '10 at 19:24
1  
Well, if you're worried about that, you can store a second salt outside of the database. That way even if they get MySQL, they won't have enough info to even brute force a usable password (assuming a strong second salt). They'd need both (I've used Apache-set environmental variables for this before. So even if the user gets all of the PHP code, they won't get the salt)... –  ircmaxell Dec 15 '10 at 19:27
1  
@mcbeav It looks alright. I have an addition, though. Please see my second edit. –  Linus Kleen Dec 15 '10 at 20:12

One suggestion. Add the password into the salting hash run:

$hash = hash('sha256', $pass);
$salt = createSalt();
$hash = hash('sha256', $salt . $hash . $pass);

The reason is to avoid collisions (albeit with SHA-256 that's pretty unlikely). Let's say there is a string foo that collides with your password bar when run through sha256... $hash from the first round would be identical, so the second hash round will also produce identical results:

$hash = hash('sha256', 'foo'); // "test" for example
$hash = hash('sha256', 'bar'); // "test" since it's a collision

$newHash = hash('sha256', $salt . $hash); //The same for both foo and bar!

Whereas if you re-introduce the the password in the second round, it won't directly collide since the string is different for each hash round...

Edit: As far as salting, I'd recommend something like this (cross-platform):

function createSalt() {
    $length = mt_rand(64, 128);
    $salt = '';
    for ($i = 0; $i < $length; $i++) {
        $salt .= chr(mt_rand(33, 255));
    }
    return $salt;
}

It uses characters outside the normal range (much higher), but excludes the common control and whitespace characters that might be stripped by the database (or trimmed out). Note that it's returning a valid ISO-8859-1 (Latin-1) string. It's not a valid UTF-8 string. So make sure the character set of the column is good, or in the worst case change 255 to 127 in the code above (but this greatly reduces the strength of the salt)...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a ton for the salt function. I really appreciate all of the help. The suggestion is great too! Thanks for all of the help. –  mcbeav Dec 15 '10 at 19:37
2  
+1 for you too. Although the chances of producing collisions still exist, getting hit by lightning while cashing in your lottery ticket you found while taking a detour on a road never travelled before, are higher. –  Linus Kleen Dec 15 '10 at 19:47
1  
@goreSplatter: Absolutely, assuming we're talking about the implementation detail of sha-256. If it was md5, then it's only like getting hit by lightning once in your lifetime... –  ircmaxell Dec 15 '10 at 19:50
1  
That's what I meant. In my answer below, I only abstained from saying "Don't use MD5, it's not collision free" because it was only used for generating the salt. –  Linus Kleen Dec 15 '10 at 19:52

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