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I'm trying to Close a process within C# but how do I check if is open first? Users asked for this feature and some of them will be still using the close button of the other process.

So, right now works fine:

Process.GetProcessesByName("ProcessName")[0].CloseMainWindow();

Now, how do I check first that it exists, this doesn't work:

if ( Process.GetProcessesByName("ProcessName")[0] != null ) {...}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Try this to avoid the race condition in which a process closes after the first call to GetProcessesByName:

Process[] processes = Process.GetProcessesByName("ProcessName");
if (processes.Length > 0)
    processes[0].CloseMainWindow();
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That is absolutely right! Thanks! –  Eric Fortis Dec 15 '10 at 19:25
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If you're planning to deploy this application on a wide range of machines, you will want to know that this code can sometimes fail.

The Process class in .NET is based on Windows performance counters, which on some machines can be disabled through the registry. When this happens, the call to the Process.GetProcessesByName method will throw an exception.

I think this situation is typical for machines with various "clean up / performance tuning" applications which, among other stuff, disable the performance counters in order to supposedly improve the machine's performance.

In the past this has repeatedly caused me pain with some percentage of my customers' client machines, which led me to explore other (if somewhat limited or cumbersome) alternatives, like making calls to Win API directly using PInvoke to iterate over the processes.

Another possible solution would be to ensure that your installer or application enables performance counters, or at least knows how to deal with them being disabled.

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Thanks for the advise Ran, I appreciate the time you are saving me. –  Eric Fortis Dec 15 '10 at 20:28
    
For this project, I'll be better only catching the exception. I'm pretty sure in some labs performance counters are disabled and it won't be a good idea to mess with the admin decisions. Thanks again. –  Eric Fortis Dec 15 '10 at 20:50
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How about

if (Process.GetProcessesByName("ProcessName").Length > 0) {...}
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Yes! thanks a lot! –  Eric Fortis Dec 15 '10 at 19:12
    
Glad I could help. –  Andy West Dec 15 '10 at 19:14
2  
I think a race condition may be hiding inside that elipsis! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 15 '10 at 19:15
    
@Jeffrey L Whitledge: Good catch. My focus was too narrow. –  Andy West Dec 15 '10 at 19:24
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Process.GetProcessesByName("ProcessName").FirstOrDefault() != null
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Thank you Jani, I'll prefer the Andy advise, because it doesn't use linq –  Eric Fortis Dec 15 '10 at 19:13
    
.Any() makes more sense –  romkyns Dec 15 '10 at 19:15
    
@Eric Up to you dude :-) –  Jani Dec 15 '10 at 19:16
1  
@romkyns using (var process = Process.GetProcessesByName("").FirstOrDefault()) { if(process !=null) { } } make even more sense :-) –  Jani Dec 15 '10 at 19:22
    
@Jani if that was humor then I didn't get it, sorry :) –  romkyns Dec 15 '10 at 21:52
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You could also just loop, which works fine if there aren't any.

foreach(Process p in Process.GetProcessesByName("ProcessName"))
{
    p.CloseMainWindow();
}
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