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I'm trying to use a while-loop to find a match between two values. One is static while the other is an entry in a list. This is the code:

 while count != 10:

    for x in rawinput[pos]:
       a = ord(x)
       hash = hash + a

    print hashlist[247]
    print hash
    print wordlist[247]

    while hash != hashlist[247]:
       pass


    print wordlist[247]
    hash = 0 
    count = count + 1

In reality, hash DOES equal hashlist[247], but instead of recognizing it and continuing the code with print wordlist[247], python gets hung up at the nested While loop. Any ideas or suggestions?

Thanks!

Edit: Fixed Indentation and removed non-relevant variables.

Edit #2: All variables are defined earlier in the script. This is only a snippet of code that is giving me trouble. Hash and Hashlist[247] are equal (print hash and print hashlist[247] each give 848 as output).

Edit #3: SOLVED -- Thanks for the help!

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2  
The indentation of your code is all wrong, this possibly happened when posting the question. Could you edit your question, paste the original code instead of what is there now, select it and press Ctrl-K to format it correctly? –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 15 '10 at 19:16
    
Sorry, I didn't even realize that :/, reposting now. –  Insomaniacal Dec 15 '10 at 19:17
    
What is the type of these values? What is in the hashlist exactly? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 15 '10 at 19:18
1  
hash is a built in function in Python. You might want to rename that variable. –  mtrw Dec 15 '10 at 19:19
1  
print repr(hashlist[247]), repr(hash) and you'll find one of them isn't the type you expect. –  user97370 Dec 15 '10 at 19:46

4 Answers 4

The code you posted doesn't nest any while loops.

while count != 10:

    for x in rawinput[pos]:
       a = ord(x)
       hash = hash + a

This is the only relevant code. This is an infinite loop assuming count didn't start at 10.

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There was a problem with indentation when I posted it... Thanks for your reply anyway. The second "while" loop is meant to be nested within the first. –  Insomaniacal Dec 15 '10 at 19:27

Thing 1: the Pythonic way of doing something 10 times is

for _ in range(10):
    ...

Thing 2: clearly Python thinks that hash != hashlist[247], or it wouldn't loop infinitely. Try print hash, hashlist[247], hash == hashlist[247] to check.

Thing 3: what's the point of while cond: pass anyway? Are you trying to do multithreaded stuff or something?

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1: Thanks, Ill keep that in mind :) 2: Yes, they are all equal. Printing the two variables gives me "848" each time. 3: There would normally be a function there, but I posted it like this just to make it readable. Thanks for your reply :) –  Insomaniacal Dec 15 '10 at 19:34
    
@user: so what do you get when you do print hash == hashlist[247]? True or False? –  katrielalex Dec 15 '10 at 19:37
    
Interstingly, I get false. I'm guessing that means this is a type problem. –  Insomaniacal Dec 15 '10 at 19:40
    
@user: well, you knew that you would get False, because otherwise the loop wouldn't have gone forever! But now at least you see where the problem is. You are correct that this is a type problem: do print type(hash), type(hashlist[247]) to see it. Are you sure that one isn't 847 and the other '847'? –  katrielalex Dec 15 '10 at 19:43
    
The interpreter prints 848 both times, no quotes or anything, but earlier on I used string.split to create hashlist, and forgot to convert the numbers to integers. Thanks for your help!! –  Insomaniacal Dec 15 '10 at 19:44

Considering the updated post (with indented code): the top-level while will be infinite, if the initial value of count is greater than 10.

Also, if hash != hashlist[247], the following loop will be infinite as well (if there are no custom __getitem__, __eq__ and changing values from another thread):

...
while hash != hashlist[247]:
   pass
...
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This was due to hash and hashlist being of a different type :/. str and int. I overlooked this, since the python interpreter didn't mention anything about a typeerror, which I'm used to it doing, and I simply forgot to check.

Thanks to everyone for your help!

To anyone who has a similar problem:

DOUBLE CHECK YOUR TYPES!!!

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