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I have a scenario where I would like to filter some entity sets at model level, not at query level, i.e. I basically want to 'hard code' the filtering into my model, so that I don't always have to repeat the same Where method filtering in every query against an entity set. More specifically, I have a CampaignTypes entity set, and in the data model I am busy with I only want campaign types belonging to a certain business area. Without the lower level filtering I seek, every time I query CampaignTypes I will have to use CampaignTypes.Where(ct => ct.BusinessArea == BusinessAreas.Outdoor). How can I avoid this repeated filtering short of creating a DB view and using that in my model instead?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted
public IQueryable<CampaignType> getCampaignTypes()
{
    using (var context = new TestEntities())
    {
        var campaignTypes = context.CampaignTypes.
            Where(ct => ct.BusinessArea == BusinessAreas.Outdoor).
            AsQueryable<CampaignTypes>();
        return campaignTypes;
    }
}

Use the result of this method, instead of accessing context directly. You can also modify your query to return a list, set, etc. by changed the "AsQueryable" method to "AsList", etc.

share|improve this answer
    
just a tip: I've learnt to not use 'using' blocks like this for EF queries. It gets in the way of lazy loading because when a client tries to access a navigation property not yet loaded, EF may try and load it and find the context already disposed, and throw you a rude exception. – ProfK Dec 16 '10 at 5:59
    
Thanks, ProfK. I'm lot using lazy loading, so wasn't aware of this. I'll take a closer look this evening (at work right now) and figure out if I should delete my answer, or modify it. – Ethel Evans Dec 16 '10 at 20:54

You can add another layer (a logical layer) between the code that doesn't need to worry about the filter and the entity set. This layer can return an IQuerable or whatever and it would apply the filter to the entity set and return the results.

That way the other parts of your application wouldn't have to worry about applying this filter and it is still a single query (for most cases) that is executing against the database.

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Yes, I have often done this before in my Service layer, but I was just curious as to any 'closer to the metal' approaches. – ProfK Dec 15 '10 at 19:57
    
There may be. I would avoid anything that has you changing generated code, since it will be overwritten as soon as you regenerate the code. Even in my simple applications, I have a middle tier, even if it is just a thin logical tier, as it is usually needed at some point in time. – Brian Ball Dec 15 '10 at 20:02

you can create another property with a different name in another file, extending the main partial class of your model.

EDIT:

namespace YourNameSpace
{
    using System.Data.Objects;

    public partial class SomeModelEntities
    {
        public ObjectSet<CampaignType> FilteredCampaignTypes
        {
            get
            {
                if ((_CampaignType == null))
                {
                    _CampaignType = base.CreateObjectSet<CampaignType>("CampaignType");
                }
                return _CampaignType.Where(ct => ct.BusinessArea == BusinessAreas.Outdoor);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "duplicate it with a different name in another file", but I don't like to change generated code, especially in early development as I re-generate the model quite often. – ProfK Dec 15 '10 at 19:56

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