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I believe have dug myself into a hole. While breaking up my single file, couple thousand line chunk of code into multiple files I appear to have grossly screwed up the structure of the program.
I'm new to C++ and its header files and namespace management so I've been learning as I go. I guess I don't fully understand how #include, using, and namespaces interrelate and what transfers over to other files, etc.

Reading through MSDN documentation I can see bits and pieces of my problem but the solution eludes me. As of now I have four .cpp files and headers:


1) A Main File

2) A GameData .cpp and its header that is contained in the namespace pData

3) A GameSettings .cpp and its header that is contained in the namespace pSettings

4) A GeneralScreens .cpp and its header that is contained in the namespace pScreens


Upon compile the debugger spews over 100 of error like:

>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\utility(454): error C2447: '{' : missing function header (old-style formal list?)
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\utility(463): error C2039: 'pair' : is not a member of 'std'
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\utility(463): error C2955: 'pScreens::std::pair' : use of class template requires template argument list
1>          c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\utility(173) : see declaration of 'pScreens::std::pair'
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(33): error C2873: 'wcsrtombs' : symbol cannot be used in a using-declaration
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(41): error C2039: 'wctob' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(41): error C2873: 'wctob' : symbol cannot be used in a using-declaration
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(42): error C2039: 'wmemchr' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(42): error C2873: 'wmemchr' : symbol cannot be used in a using-declaration
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(42): error C2039: 'wmemcmp' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(42): error C2873: 'wmemcmp' : symbol cannot be used in a using-declaration
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(42): error C2039: 'wmemcpy' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(42): error C2873: 'wmemcpy' : symbol cannot be used in a using-declaration
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\cwchar(43): error C2039: 'wmemmove' : is not a member of '`global namespace''
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\new(93): error C2039: 'nothrow_t' : is not a member of 'std'
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\new(93): error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\new(93): error C2143: syntax error : missing ',' before '&'
1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\new(99): error C2039: 'new_handler' : is not a member of 'std'

Are these errors indicative of something?

I'm assuming something is wrong with the way I'm referencing the std library though I have no idea how to pinpoint the error because all the errors are in library files.

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1  
What is the minimum amount of code that causes this problem? –  James McNellis Dec 15 '10 at 19:43
    
A minimal code sample would help tremendously. Besides that, you can search MSDN for the error codes: each error code's page gives examples of what can trigger it, so you can compare your code against those. –  suszterpatt Dec 15 '10 at 19:49
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Most likely you're missing a semicolon on the end if a class or struct definition in a header file. The compiler then treats every identifier it sees as an instance of that class instead of what you're expecting. Then the compiler complains because it has no idea what to do with the stray {}s it sees.

Check the header that's #included just before <utility> in your implementation file; that header is most likely where the fault lies.

Side note: To avoid this problem, always #include standard headers before your own headers in a .CPP file. For example, instead of

// MyGameThing.cpp
#include "MyGameThing.hpp"
#include <utility>
#include <string>

// code

do

// MyGameThing.cpp
#include <utility>
#include <string>
#include "MyGameThing.hpp"

// code

That way you won't get compile errors like this buried in the standard headers.

share|improve this answer
    
one thing though is that I never included Utility, should I just go searching for the library that has it as a dependency? –  Fuller Dec 15 '10 at 19:52
    
Thanks for the tip on the header file order too, I've been wondering about that –  Fuller Dec 15 '10 at 19:52
    
@Fuller: <utility> is included in several places (namely because it contains std::pair which is used for things like std::map). Change your include orders around, and check your headers for missing semicolons. –  Billy ONeal Dec 15 '10 at 19:55
    
Yup, score another one for the preprocessor. The compiler can't tell that a declaration spans two source code files. –  Hans Passant Dec 15 '10 at 20:21
    
The usual error text for this problem complains about a missing ';'. Still could be that issue, but I'd bet more on possible misuse of namespaces and {}. For instance, forgetting a '}' can cause all sorts of fucked up errors because the next header gets included in the wrong namespace and definitions/specializations/etc... are all fucked up. –  Crazy Eddie Dec 15 '10 at 20:36
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The first compiler error is going to be your best clue:

c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 10.0\vc\include\utility(454): error C2447: '{' : missing function header (old-style formal list?)

I'm guessing that what's happening here is you may have a class or struct declaration with no ending semicolon. So you have something like this:

struct Foo
{
}  // <---  no semicolon here will generate funky errors

But overall, pay close & special attention to the first compiler error.

As @Billy mentions in the comments below, the rules for struct and class are the same. In either case, you need the semicolon. Also, old-school C code will often typedef structs like this:

typedef struct tag_Foo
{
} Foo; // <-- still need the semicolon

Here, you still need the semicolon.

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+1 for the code example of what I was talking about. Note that class 's rules aren't any different from struct -- you need the semicolon. –  Billy ONeal Dec 15 '10 at 20:01
    
@Billy: Edited to be more specific about this, thx –  John Dibling Dec 15 '10 at 20:07
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If using Visual C++, open the first cpp file and press CTRL+F7, this will compile only the cpp file, check the first error and try to correct this. When fixed go to the next cpp file if the error persists.

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The error doesn't occur in a cpp file, it occurs in the header utility. –  Billy ONeal Dec 15 '10 at 20:00
    
This is a pretty cool tip though, I'm thoroughly enjoying all these answers. –  Fuller Dec 16 '10 at 2:25
    
I know the error does not occur on a cpp file, but you cannot compile a header file, only cpp, that why I sugest you to try to compile each cpp file at a time. –  bcsanches Dec 16 '10 at 13:59
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Billy's attempt is a decent one, but the usual response to a missing ';' is for the compiler to say so. A missing '}' on the other hand can seriously confuse standard headers included afterward because all their content is within the scope of either the namespace or class that should have been closed. Also, ';' missing is more immediately detectable while a missing '}' isn't necessarily an error so the compiler just pisses a fit at the first thing that doesn't make sense in that scope.

Furthermore, at line 454 in utility for the 2010 compiler is the opening brace for a specialization of tuple_size for std::pair. Post preprocessor that definition would look like so:

template < ... >
struct tuple_size< ::std::pair<_Ty1, _Ty2> >

If you have forgotten a '}' closing a namespace then that's not where pair<> exists anymore. Instead, since it's declared like so:

namespace std { template < ... > struct pair ... }

Whatever scope wasn't closed is now where std is being declared and struct tuple_size< ::std::pair<...> > doesn't make any sense to the parser. Since it's not a valid name it tends to pretend it's not even there and then '{' at the global scope without anything of sense before it is pretty f'n confusing.

BTW, an often unspoken benefit of making minimal examples that cause the problem is that you end up FINDING the problem trying to make it happen.

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Sorry I had a bit of a miscommunication here, the errors I posted were merely a sampling of about 200 something, the utility error is not the first one in the stack. I am currently looking for a brace mismatch though as that seems to be the common answer here. –  Fuller Dec 15 '10 at 23:15
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