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Is there a way to check if JavaScript is enabled with PHP? If so, how?

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5  
Nope. Well. Not on the first visit. On the second+ yes. Use AJAX to set a session var. If it is set on page 2, you have JS. If not, you don't. This could work on a front login page... but if you need it on the first page load, you can't have it. –  DampeS8N Dec 15 '10 at 20:30
2  
Even if it's set in a variable session, you can disable it after. So it's unreliable. –  metrobalderas Dec 15 '10 at 20:35
    
Agree with @DampeS8N. I've made this simple script to check for. stackoverflow.com/a/29136452/2480481 (an answer below link). –  erm3nda May 26 at 15:48

23 Answers 23

up vote 33 down vote accepted

No, that is not possible, because PHP is a server side language, it does not access the client's browser in any way or form (the client requests from the PHP server).

The client may provide some meta info through HTTP headers, but they don't necessarily tell you whether the user has JavaScript enabled or not and you can't rely on them anyway,

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21  
A good rule of thumb is to create pages and assume javascript is off. Once loaded, use javascript to "write" to your page. This allows for progressive enhancement. –  csi Dec 15 '10 at 21:17
6  
As many others have pointed out it IS possible it just is not simple. I can not understand why THIs is the accepted answer. –  Oliver A. Feb 5 '13 at 10:23
    
stackoverflow.com/a/29136452/2480481 a two moves way to make Javascript tell you it is. –  erm3nda May 26 at 15:51

perhaps a more simple option...

<html>
<body>
<noscript>
  This page needs JavaScript activated to work. 
  <style>div { display:none; }</style>
</noscript>
<div>
my content
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
you are The Genius :) –  Bholu Aug 22 '13 at 8:59
1  
This is amazing :) i liked very much –  Jack Ben Oct 19 '13 at 16:50
1  
It works great! –  user3111737 Mar 13 '14 at 11:53
    
Your solution is clever and efficient, but it does not validate W3C's HTML5 standards: Element style not allowed as child of element noscript in this context. (Suppressing further errors from this subtree.) You can keep this simplicity but still be valid, with <noscript> <div style="display:none"> </noscript> <span>my content</span> <noscript></div></noscript>. –  Clément Nov 8 '14 at 1:12
1  
This doesn't tell you about the script, just warns the user. This is also a good way to autocheck for javascript. Just need to refresh url to the current phpsessid/session and you'll get the confirmation about is not present. No matter if you do w or w/o the javascript, check for it is just easy. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 1:07

Technically no because as the other answers have said, PHP is strictly server-side, but you could do this...

In the PHP page on the server, output (a lot of HTML has been deleted for brevity)

<html>
   <head>
      <script type="text/javascript" src="jquery1.4.4.js"></script>
      <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function(){
           $.get("myPage.php");
         });
      </script>
   </head>
 </html>

Then in myPage.php set a session variable to indicate the client supports JS

<?php
   session_start();
   $_SESSION['js'] = true;
?>

But really, just use <script></script><noscript></noscript> tags, much, much less effort...

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This worked for me. –  Kim Oct 19 '12 at 9:44
    
GOD. This is actually the solution i was thinking for. You ONLY need to check for it. Chris, think about is not the same thing do something using script noscript directive on the client then just KNOW about that and store the data. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 1:10

//Here is a solution: //it works perfect

<?php

if(!isset($_SESSION['js'])||$_SESSION['js']==""){
  echo "<noscript><meta http-equiv='refresh' content='0;url=/get-javascript-status.php&js=0'> </noscript>";
   $js = true;

 }elseif(isset($_SESSION['js'])&& $_SESSION['js']=="0"){
   $js = false;
   $_SESSION['js']="";

 }elseif(isset($_SESSION['js'])&& $_SESSION['js']=="1"){
   $js = true;
   $_SESSION['js']="";
}

if ($js) {
    echo 'Javascript is enabled';
 } else {
    echo 'Javascript is disabled';
}

?>

//And then inside get-javascript-status.php :

$_SESSION['js'] = isset($_GET['js'])&&$_GET['js']=="0" ? "0":"1";
header('location: /');
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3  
So this would imply (correct me if I'm wrong) that each time a user sees the front page for the first time, it "forces" a redirection so the page is re-loaded an then you check on the reload, if it's javascript enabled? It sounds like it's bringing in an elephant to kill a mouse. But you're right: it works. It would be maybe safer to add a warning before showing the code. –  Olivier Pons May 9 '13 at 20:44
    
Seems copied code from another webpage, but not complete. @ Chris Thompson has the correct and easies way to do that. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 1:14

You can't tell if a browser has JS enabled, but you can tell if the browser supports JS http://php.net/manual/en/function.get-browser.php

$js_capable = get_browser(null, true)=>javascript == 1

Having said this, that's probably not of much use. You should reconsider detecting JS from PHP. There should be no need for it if you use progressive enhancement, meaning that JS only adds functionality to what's already on the page.

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Do the end users need to configure their systems to use this? –  Parris Varney Dec 15 '10 at 21:08
1  
I hate being mean, but did you read the link? There are notes about configuring it. I don't suggest using it, by the way, it's not truly reliable for many things. –  Juan Mendes Dec 15 '10 at 21:23
8  
Reading the comments from that page actually tells you that it'll tell you whether the browser type in the HTTP headers supports JS, not whether it's enabled. –  Juan Mendes Dec 15 '10 at 21:25
    
This is just blatantly wrong. –  SublymeRick May 9 '13 at 19:07
1  
@SublymeRick I reworded the answer so it's more obvious that it doesn't solve the problem at hand, but it's still good information to know. –  Juan Mendes May 9 '13 at 20:35

You can try with 2 metod:

  • setting cookies with JS and detecting them from PHP
  • creating a form with a hidden field and an empty value; and then assigning some value to it with JS, if the field gets the value – JS is ON, otherwise it’s off. But the form had to be submitted first before PHP can request that hidden field’s value.

if you want detect if JS enable enable setting before the loading of the page you can try this (I don't konw if it works):

<?php
if (isset($_POST['jstest'])) {
  $nojs = FALSE;
  } else {
  // create a hidden form and submit it with javascript
  echo '<form name="jsform" id="jsform" method="post" style="display:none">';
  echo '<input name="jstest" type="text" value="true" />';
  echo '<script language="javascript">';
  echo 'document.jsform.submit();';
  echo '</script>';
  echo '</form>';
  // the variable below would be set only if the form wasn't submitted, hence JS is disabled
  $nojs = TRUE;
}
if ($nojs){
  //JS is OFF, do the PHP stuff
}
?>

there is a fine tutorial on this issue on address http://www.inspirationbit.com/php-js-detection-of-javascript-browser-settings/

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PHP can't be used to detect whether javascript is enabled or not. Instead use <noscript> to display an alternate message / do something.

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Browsers don't load separate JavaScript-files if JavaScript is disabled. This is something PHP could detect. Resp.: Htaccess could set a cookie based on the request. –  B.F. May 11 at 9:57
<noscript>
    <?php if(basename($_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']) != "disable.html"){ ?>
        <meta http-equiv="Refresh" content="0;disable.html">
    <?php } ?>
</noscript>

Place above code in your header file after title tag and set appropriate like[disable.html] for redirection.

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This is the way I check whether javascript and cookies are enabled or not http://asdlog.com/Check_if_cookies_and_javascript_are_enabled

I copy/paste it here

<?
if($_SESSION['JSexe']){     //3rd check js
    if($_COOKIE['JS'])  setcookie('JS','JS',time()-1);//check on every page load
    else            header('Location: js.html');
}               //2nd so far it's been server-side scripting. Client-side scripting must be executed once to set second cookie.
                //Without JSexe, user with cookies and js enabled would be sent to js.html the first page load.
elseif($_COOKIE['PHP'])     $_SESSION['JSexe'] = true;
else{               //1st check cookies
    if($_GET['cookie']) header('Location: cookies.html');
    else{
                setcookie('PHP','PHP');
                header('Location: '.$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'].'?cookie=1');
    }
}
?>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">document.cookie = 'JS=JS'</script>
</head>
share|improve this answer
    
This includes 3rd party right? Seems that but is not advised. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 2:42

Recently, I had the following dilemma:

I use a PHP function that generates a QR image related to the current URL, which is very useful for mobile devices. The function works fine, but having my site on a shared hosting, there are some limits for CPU and RAM usage. This function is to heavy and it consumes a lot of CPU time and RAM, so the hosting guys asked me to decrease the usage.

After some tries, I finally reached the idea that I can save some CPU & RAM usage from search engine bots. It is difficult to recognize a bot by browser identification, but all the bots have no JS enabled and that's the main criteria I used to detect if it is a real browser or it is a bot. To explain how significant it is to prevent executing code which will not give anything more for Search Engines (QR, in my case, does not affect search engines), I can say that just Google bot for example makes about 16000 crawls a day on my site.

So I've made this very simple thing which helped a lot:

<script language="javascript"><!--
document.write('<?php echo drawQR($_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"]);?>');
//--></script>

This code uses JS to write a line of PHP code, so this line will be written only when JS is enabled.

Of couse you can use 'noscript' tag if you want to show something when JS is disabled, but this method shows how to execute some PHP only when JS is enabled.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Does not work. The PHP code is always executed, instead use <noscript>no JS</noscript> to detect –  Kim Oct 19 '12 at 9:05
    
PHP code is always executed - righ, but document.write which actualy adds it to the document structure - not. <noscript> could or couldn't be managed by a bot - depends on the bot ... but javascript normally is disabled in all bots I know. –  Reflective Oct 19 '12 at 16:31
    
You should clarify that drawQR writes out an <img> tag with a SRC pointing at the QR generation script - otherwise, it looks like you generate the QR code and then write out a link to it only if the user has JS enabled. –  Sean Vieira Oct 29 '12 at 22:02
    
that's true, thanks –  Reflective Oct 29 '12 at 22:10

Here is a small include I made up that I have on top of my pages to detect if js is enabled. Hope this helps out...

<?php
//Check if we should check for js
if ((!isset($_GET['jsEnabled']) || $_GET['jsEnabled'] == 'true') && !isset($_SERVER['HTTP_X_REQUESTED_WITH'])){

   //Check to see if we already found js enabled
   if (!isset($_SESSION['javaEnabled'])){
      //Check if we were redirected by javascript
      if (isset($_GET['jsEnabled'])){
         //Check if we have started a session
         if(session_id() == '') {
            session_start();
         }

         //Set session variable that we have js enabled
         $_SESSION['javaEnabled'] = true;
      }
      else{
         $reqUrl = $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
         $paramConnector = (strpos($reqUrl, "?"))? "&" : "?";

         echo "
            <script type='text/javascript'>
               window.location = '" . $reqUrl . $paramConnector . "jsEnabled=true'
            </script>
            <noscript>
               <!-- Redirect to page and tell us that JS is not enabled -->
               <meta HTTP-EQUIV='REFRESH' content='0; " . $reqUrl . $paramConnector . "jsEnabled=false'>
            </noscript>
         ";

         //Break out and try again to check js
         exit;
      }
   }
}
?>
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfect! The only thing is about the URL. Once you get true or false, the state is perpetued, because you are reading the current GET params. So, if i check that, and block javascript the result is faked with the URL params. Running from the entry point is working perfect. Thanks for that example :) –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 4:10

Make your main php page assume jscript is off, and add a <script> to redirect to the jscript-enabled app in the <head>. If the user actually uses your first page, assume jscript is off.

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Other option: If you dont' have to check if JS is enabled at the visitors first view (mainpage) you can set a cookie with js. On the next page you can check with php if the cookie is there...

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You can use logic the logic (default/switch) - is this example I printed the variable in php:

PHP:

$js = 'No';
print 'Javascript Enabled: &lt;span id="jsEnabled"&gt;'.$js.'&lt;/span&gt;';

JS: (in my document ready)

jQuery('#jsEnabled').text('Yes'); or $('#jsEnabled').text('Yes');
share|improve this answer
    
This just shows the status to the user. Nothing goes to PHP. –  tricasse Jan 10 '13 at 10:03

You can set a cookie using Javascript and then reload the page using Javascript. Then using PHP you shall check if the cookie is setted, if it is Javascript is enabled!

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Its 2013. Simply have your script render the non-js templates inside a body > noscript tag, then inside your CSS keep your main js site container div display: none; After that just put something like <script>$('#container').show();</script> immediately after you close you main #container div and before your noscript tag. (if you're using jquery of course).

Doing it this way will show the HTML for the non-js enabled browsers automatically, and then the js enabled browsers will only see the js site.

If you're worried about over-bloating the page size with too much mark up, then you could do the same but instead leave <div id="content"></div> empty, then with the js code instead of just showing the div use an ajax call to fetch the content for it.

On a side note, I would probably include additional css files for the non-js site within the noscript tag to save on bandwidth.

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Since PHP is server side you can't know in PHP whether the client has Javascript enabled unless you use sessions (or some other way to store data across requests) and first send some code to which the client responds.

If you put the following at the start of your PHP file the client is redirected to the same URL with either 'js=0' or 'js=1' appended to the query string, depending on whether they have Javascript enabled or not. Upon receiving the redirected request the script records the result in a session variable and then redirects back to the original URL, i.e. without the appended 'js=0' or 'js=1'.Upon receiving this second redirect the script proceeds as normal, now with the session variable set according to the clients Javascript capability.

If you don't care about how your query string looks in the user's address bar you can skip the second redirect and just set the session variable. While these redirects are taking place the user is shown a short informative message (also something you could skip if you don't care about that).

<?php
session_start();
if (!isset($_SESSION['js']) && !isset($_GET['js'])) {
    $url=$_SERVER['SCRIPT_URI'];
    $qry='?'.($q=$_SERVER['QUERY_STRING']).($q?'&':'').'js';
    die('<!DOCTYPE html><html lang="en"><head><meta charset="utf-8" /><title>js check</title>'.
        '<script type="text/javascript">window.location.href="'.$url.$qry.'=1";</script>'.
        '<noscript><meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; url='.$url.$qry.'=0" /></noscript>'.
        '</head><body>Hold on while we check whether you have Javascript enabled.</body></html>');
} elseif (isset($_GET['js'])) {
    $_SESSION['js']=$_GET['js'];
    $qry = preg_replace('%&?js=(0|1)$%', '', $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING']);
    $url = $_SERVER['SCRIPT_URI'].($qry?'?':'').$qry;
    die('<!DOCTYPE html><html lang="en"><head><meta charset="utf-8" /><title>js check</title>'.
        '<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0; url='.$url.$qry.'" />'.
        '</head><body>Hold on while we check whether you have Javascript enabled.</body></html>');
}

if ($_SESSION['js']) {
    //Javascript is enabled
} else {
    //Javascript is disabled
}
?>
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Create a cookie using JavaScript and read it using PHP.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is basically the raw answer. You can do that using php session functions wich is in fact a cookie managed by PHP. But, do not limit your code to cookies. One thing is check for javascript technology and the other is about cookie permissions. Using javascript GET we can check for more things than a cookie. We can write to a server file instead a cookie, as example. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 3:12

Please despite all the people telling you cant check for a client-side scripting technology. If the target technology has http functions, you can do ALWAYS, just write out a verify step. That means literally, the way to check javascript is to run javascript. If javascript is disabled on the browser side it's not possible to check if the client is Javascript capable (like Dillo with it's default config or others)

UPDATED: I've develop this script because i test some of the examples here and seems that everybody does copypasting without any sort of tests. Code is also on the Gist https://gist.github.com/erm3nda/4af114b520c7208f8f3f (updated)

//function to check for session after|before PHP version 5.4.0
function start_session() {
    if(version_compare(phpversion(), "5.4.0") != -1){
        if (session_status() == PHP_SESSION_NONE) {
            session_start();
        }
    } else {
        if(session_id() == '') {
            session_start();
        }
    }
}

// starting the function
start_session();

// create a script to run on the AJAX GET request from :P Javascript enabled browser
echo 
    '<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
    $(document).ready(function(){
    $.get(document.URL.substring(0, document.URL.length-1) + "?sessionstart=1");
    console.log(document.URL.substring(0, document.URL.length-1) + "?sessionstart=1")}
    </script>;

// Ajax GET request handle
if ($_REQUEST['sessionstart'] == 1){
    $_SESSION['js'] = 1; // save into session variable
  } else {
    session_destroy(); // force reset the test. otherwise session
  }

// If the session variable has not saved by the AJAX call, loads again.
if (!isset($_SESSION['js'])){
    header("Refresh: 1"); // thats only for the first load
    echo "Javascript is not enabled <br>"; // Return false
} else {
    echo "Javascript is enabled <br>"; // Return true
}

This solution do not need more files, just a iteration if you run a Javascript capable browser. The value is passed back to PHP using a GET with a simple variable but anyone can fake the output doing cURL to url + ?sessionstart=1. I don't protect that and dont know how to do right now.

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To get rid of bots with JS disabled:

<?php
session_start();
@$_SESSION['pagecount']++;
?>

<html>
<head>

<?php 
if (!isset($_COOKIE['JSEnabled']) || strlen($_COOKIE['JSEnabled'])!=32 ) {
  $js_cookie=md5(md5(@$_SESSION['pagecount']) . $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
  echo '<script language="javascript">';
  echo 'document.cookie="JSEnabled=' . $js_cookie . '"';
  echo '</script>';
  echo '<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0;url=http://example.com"/>';
}
?>

<?php 
 $js=$_COOKIE['JSEnabled'];
 if ($js!=md5(md5(@$_SESSION['pagecount']-1) . $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'])) {
 $js_cookie=md5(md5(@$_SESSION['pagecount']) . $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
  echo '<script language="javascript">';
  echo 'document.cookie="JSEnabled=' . $js_cookie . '"';
  echo '</script>';
     echo "</head><body>Sorry, this website needs javascript and cookies enabled.</body></html>";
     die();
 } else {
  $js_cookie=md5(md5(@$_SESSION['pagecount']) . $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);
  echo '<script language="javascript">';
  echo 'document.cookie="JSEnabled=' . $js_cookie . '"';
  echo '</script>';    

 }

?>

No one can use for example curl -H "Cookie: JSEnabled=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX" because they don't know your algo of computing the hash.

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How about using some php in the <script> tag like :

<html>
<script>
    window.onload = dothis;
    function dothis(){
        document.write('<?php echo "JavaScript is enabled"; ?>');
    }
</script>
</html>

<?php
echo 'JavaScript is disabled';
?>

This seems to work for me.

share|improve this answer
    
You cannot write PHP code from JS ! –  Ty221 Aug 29 '13 at 19:13
    
In the basis of a simplest check, this is OK. Even if it cannot write the PHP, in fact is doing what him says. The result is a plain response, but the whole document is wiped out. Using this a single step to check is good, but cannot be part of the current script, cuz you'll overwrite the document. Anyway, this has nothing related on the PHP. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 3:50

Yes.

Ensure you have the latest jQuery.js

//javascript
$(function(){
$('#jsEnabled2').html('Yes it is')
}) 

//php
$js - 'No';
$jscheck = 'Javascript Enabled: ';
$jscheck .= '<span id="jsEnabled">'.$js.'</span>';
print $jscheck;
share|improve this answer
2  
That will tell the USER if JS is enabled, it won't tell the PHP script. And why does it need the latest jQuery, it looks like it should work in practically any version? You don't even need PHP for this. Just put the SPAN diectly in your HTML. Finally, your assignment to $js has a typo. –  Barmar Sep 23 '12 at 5:45
    
I believe the question was to use php to check if it was enable. In this example, a php variable is printed, it will be no unless javascript is enabled; no? –  adswebwork Sep 25 '12 at 22:55

It's not that hard. Just type:

<body>
    <noscript>
        <?php
            $js = false;
        ?>
    </noscript>
    <!--content-->
        <?php
            if($js != false)
            {
                echo "JavaScript is enabled!";
            }
            else{
                echo "JavaScript is disabled. Please enable JavaScript in order to use this website.";    
            }
        ?>
    <!--/content-->  
</body>
share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm… this looks pretty elegant. Can someone explain why it is being down-voted? –  Dave Dec 14 '13 at 2:10
1  
$js will always be false. PHP runs on the server, it won't process client side stuff like <noscript>. –  Quentin Jan 9 '14 at 7:15
    
@Quentin While you is right, the real problem on that is that noscript is parsed on both ways. <noscript> fires content on non-java browsers, but the php tag runs on another scope. –  erm3nda Mar 19 at 3:58

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