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I'm using simple locking in C# using the lock statement. Is there any way to determine how many other threads are waiting to get a lock on the object? I basically want to limit the number of threads that are waiting for a lock to 5. My code would throw an exception if a sixth thread needs to get a lock.

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This sounds like the second half of a cumbersome solution. What's the actual problem you're trying to solve? –  Anon. Dec 15 '10 at 21:25
    
Painful to explain, but I have an object which is a wrapper around a 3rd party web service. The trick is that calls to the 3rd party service have to be synchronized, hence the locking of the wrapper object. I'm using the wrapper object in a website environment, so multiple threads could try to use it at the same time. The reason I want to limit the queue of waiting threads to 5 is that I'm slightly concerned how easy it would be to create a DoS attach. The 3rd party web service is very slow, so someone could easily send requests and I'd have 100s of blocked threads. –  Ben Mills Dec 15 '10 at 21:34
1  
@Ben: It sounds like the resource you need to limit is the number of threads in the system, not how many can be waiting on a lock. Don't ever make one thread per request; make one thread per processor, and if you run out of processors, make the client wait until a thread frees up. –  Eric Lippert Dec 15 '10 at 21:43
    
@Eric: I don't know this for sure, but doesn't ASP.NET use 1 thread per request? Maybe I'm wrong and blocking the ASP.NET thread would stop my website from servicing any more requests until the thread is no longer locked. That would be bad. –  Ben Mills Dec 15 '10 at 21:56
    
@Eric: I don't know much about multi threading, but should one make 1 thread per processor or per core, or does this depend on the problem being solved? –  Joan Venge Dec 15 '10 at 22:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This can be easily accomplished via the Semaphore class. It will do the counting for you. Notice in the code below that I use a semaphore to do a non-blocking check of the number of threads waiting for the resource and then I use a plain old lock to actually serialize access to that resource. An exception is thrown if there are more than 5 threads waiting for the resource.

public class YourResourceExecutor
{
  private Semaphore m_Semaphore = new Semaphore(5, 5);

  public void Execute()
  {
    bool acquired = false;
    try
    {
      acquired = m_Semaphore.WaitOne(0);
      if (!acquired)
      {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
      }
      lock (m_Semaphore)
      {
        // Use the resource here.
      }
    }
    finally
    {
      if (acquired) m_Semaphore.Release();
    }
  }
}

There is one notable variation of this pattern. You could change the name of the method to TryExecute and have it return a bool instead of throwing an exception. It is completely up to you.

Remember that the object used in the lock expression is not the subject of the lock. It merely serves as an identifier for a synchronized block of code. Any code blocks that acquire locks using the same object will effectively be serialized. It is the code block that is being "locked", not the object used in the lock expression

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I think I understand this, but when the m_Semaphore is locked using lock(), can any other thread acquire a semaphore lock? I'm wondering if the lock() should be on a seperate object. –  Ben Mills Dec 16 '10 at 21:50
    
@Ben: Yes, you could definitely use a separate object for the lock. I just chose to use an object that already existed as opposed to creating a separate one. Using a lock on a Semaphore will in no way impact the the Semaphore's behavior. –  Brian Gideon Dec 16 '10 at 21:57
    
@Brian, I'm new to this, but I thought that if you got a lock on an object via lock(), then no other thread can access the object in any way. –  Ben Mills Dec 17 '10 at 14:21
    
@Ben: No, the object used in the lock expression is not the subject of the lock. It merely serves as an identifier for a synchronized block of code. Any code blocks that acquire locks using the same object will effectively be serialized. It is the code block that is being "locked", not the object used in the lock expression. –  Brian Gideon Dec 17 '10 at 14:27
    
@Brian: That's great to know. Thanks so much for your answer. It's exactly what I'm looking for. Is there any reason not to use a SemaphoreSlim? –  Ben Mills Dec 17 '10 at 16:46

The lock statement is a shortcut for Monitor.Enter and Monitor.Exit. I do not think, that you have a chance to get the number of waiting objects.

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You can use a simple shared counter(integer) that increments before the lock statement. If the value is equal to 5 then have your thread avoid the lock statement. The challenge however is that you will need to lock the counter to ensure the increment operation is atomic.

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You could do Interlocked.Increment for that. –  Conrad Frix Dec 15 '10 at 21:29
    
+1 to Conrad's suggestion; probably the simplest way to implement this. –  KeithS Dec 15 '10 at 21:43

No, lock() uses the Monitor class and that has no member for finding out the nr of queued threads.

You can specify a time-out.

And frankly, throwing an Exception when a queue fills up sounds like a bad idea.

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