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I've started the very long and arduous quest to learn and apply TDD to my workflow. I'm under the impression that TDD fits in very well with IoC principles.

After browsing some of TDD tagged questions here in SO, I read it's a good idea to program against interfaces, not objects.

Can you provide simple code examples of what this is, and how to apply it in real use cases? Simple examples is key for me (and other people wanting to learn) to grasp the concepts.

Thanks so much.

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5  
This is kind of an OOP thing rather than a C# specific thing... –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 0:44
2  
@Billy ONeal: Could be, but since interfaces act differently in say C#/Java, I'd like to learn on the language I'm most familiar with first. –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 0:46
10  
@Sergio Boombastic: the concept of programming to an Interface has nothing to do with an interface in either Java or C#. In fact, when the book from which this quote is taken was written, neither Java nor C# even existed. –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 16 '10 at 1:25
1  
@Jörg: well, it has something to do with it. Interfaces in recent OOP languages are certainly intended to be used as described in the quote. –  Michael Petrotta Dec 16 '10 at 1:45
1  
@Michael Petrotta: They aren't very good at it, though. For example, the Interface of List says that after add ing an element to the list, the element is in the list and the length of list increases by 1. Where does it actually say that in the [ interface List ](Download.Oracle.Com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/List.html#add)? –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 16 '10 at 2:51

7 Answers 7

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Consider:

class MyClass
{
    //Implementation
    public void Foo() {}
}

class SomethingYouWantToTest
{
    public bool MyMethod(MyClass c)
    {
        //Code you want to test
        c.Foo();
    }
}

Because MyMethod accepts only a MyClass, if you want to replace MyClass with a mock object in order to unit test, you can't. Better is to use an interface:

interface IMyClass
{
    void Foo();
}

class MyClass : IMyClass
{
    //Implementation
    public void Foo() {}
}

class SomethingYouWantToTest
{
    public bool MyMethod(IMyClass c)
    {
        //Code you want to test
        c.Foo();
    }
}

Now you can test MyMethod, because it uses only an interface, not a particular concrete implementation. You can take that interface and inherit from it to create any kind of mock or fake that you want, or you can use any of the prefab mocking libraries, like Rhino.Mocks.MockRepository.StrictMock<T>(), which can take the interface and build you a mock object on the fly.

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+1 - a nice simple example –  Michael Shimmins Dec 16 '10 at 0:51
13  
Side note: It doesn't always have to be an actual interface in the sense the language you are using uses the word. It could as well be an abstract class which is not entirely unreasonable, given the restrictions Java or C# place on inheritance. –  Joey Dec 16 '10 at 0:54
    
@Michael: Thank you :) –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 0:54
2  
@Joey: You could use an abstract class, yes, but if you do that you have to design the class to be intended to be inheritable, which can be a bit more work. Of course, in languages like C++ which don't have a language-level interface you do exactly that -- make an abstract class. Note though that in Java and C# it's still better to use the interface, because you can inherit from multiple interfaces, but only one class. Allowing multiple interface inheritance encourages you to make your interfaces smaller, which is a good thing TM :) –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 0:56
5  
@Joey: you don't even have to use anything. In Ruby, for example, the Interface against which you program is typically only documented in English, if at all. That doesn't make it any less of an Interface, though. Conversely, slapping interface keywords all over your code, doesn't mean it's programming against Interface s. Thought experiment: Take horrible tightly coupled incohesive code. For every class, simply copy&paste it, delete all method bodies, replace the class keyword with interface and update all references in the code to that type. Is the code now any better? –  Jörg W Mittag Dec 16 '10 at 1:31

It's all a matter of intimacy. If you code to an implementation (a realized object) you are in a pretty intimate relationship with that "other" code, as a consumer of it. It means you have to know how to construct it (ie, what dependencies it has, possibly as constructor params, possibly as setters), when to dispose of it, and you probably can't do much without it.

An interface in front of the realized object lets you do a few things -

  1. For one you can/should leverage a factory to construct instances of the object. IOC containers do this very well for you, or you can make your own. With construction duties outside of your responsibility, your code can just assume it is getting what it needs. On the other side of the factory wall, you can either construct real instances, or mock instances of the class. In production you would use real of course, but for testing, you may want to create stubbed or dynamically mocked instances to test various system states without having to run the system.
  2. You don't have to know where the object is. This is useful in distributed systems where the object you want to talk to may or may not be local to your process or even system. If you ever programmed Java RMI or old skool EJB you know the routine of "talking to the interface" that was hiding a proxy that did the remote networking and marshalling duties that your client didn't have to care about. WCF has a similar philosophy of "talk to the interface" and let the system determine how to communicate with the target object/service.

** UPDATE ** There was a request for an example of an IOC Container (Factory). There are many out there for pretty much all platforms, but at their core they work like this:

  1. You initialize the container on your applications startup routine. Some frameworks do this via config files or code or both.

  2. You "Register" the implementations that you want the container to create for you as a factory for the interfaces they implement (eg: register MyServiceImpl for the Service interface). During this registration process there is typically some behavioral policy you can provide such as if a new instance is created each time or a single(ton) instance is used

  3. When the container creates objects for you, it injects any dependencies into those objects as part of the creation process (ie, if your object depends on another interface, an implementation of that interface is in turn provided and so on).

Pseudo-codishly it could look like this:

IocContainer container = new IocContainer();

//Register my impl for the Service Interface, with a Singleton policy
container.RegisterType(Service, ServiceImpl, LifecyclePolicy.SINGLETON);

//Use the container as a factory
Service myService = container.Resolve<Service>();

//Blissfully unaware of the implementation, call the service method.
myService.DoGoodWork();
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+1 for point 1. That was very clear and understandable.Point 2 went woosh over my head. :P –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 1:05
1  
@Sergio: What hoserdude means is that there are plenty of cases where your code never knows what the actual implementor of the object is, because it's implemented by the Framework, or by some other library, on your behalf, automatically. –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 1:20
    
Can you give a good, basic example of an IoC container factory? –  bulltorious Feb 16 '11 at 17:34

When programming against an interface you will write code that uses an instance of an interface, not a concrete type. For instance you might use the following pattern, which incorporates constructor injection. Constructor injection and other parts of inversion of control aren't required to be able to program against interfaces, however since you're coming from the TDD and IoC perspective I've wired it up this way to give you some context you're hopefully familiar with.

public class PersonService
{
    private readonly IPersonRepository repository;

    public PersonService(IPersonRepository repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    public IList<Person> PeopleOverEighteen
    {
        get
        {
            return (from e in repository.Entities where e.Age > 18 select e).ToList();
        }
    }
}

The repository object is passed in and is an interface type. The benefit of passing in an interface is the ability to 'swap out' the concrete implementation without changing the usage.

For instance one would assume that at runtime the IoC container will inject a repository that is wired to hit the database. During testing time, you can pass in a mock or stub repository to exercise your PeopleOverEighteen method.

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3  
+1 -- it should be noted that there's no reason that you really need something like an IoC container in order to use interfaces effectively. –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 0:48
    
@Billy - good point, will update. –  Michael Shimmins Dec 16 '10 at 0:49
    
So basically, the only benefit I gain is the ability to use a Mocking framework? –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 0:51
    
And extensibility. Testability is a nice side affect of a low coupled, highly cohesive system. By passing around interfaces you're removing the concern about what the actual class does. You are no longer concerned with how it does it, but only that it claims that it does do it. This enforces separation of concerns, and allows you to focus on the specific requirement of the current work. –  Michael Shimmins Dec 16 '10 at 0:53
1  
@Billy - I was assuming Domain Driven Development –  Michael Shimmins Dec 16 '10 at 0:55

It means think generic. Not specific.

Suppose you have an application that notify the user sending him some message. If you work using an interface IMessage for example

interface IMessage
{
    public void Send();
}

you can customize, per user, the way they receive the message. For example somebody want to be notified wih an Email and so your IoC will create an EmailMessage concrete class. Some other wants SMS, and you create an instance of SMSMessage.

In all these case the code for notifying the user will never be changed. Even if you add another concrete class.

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+1 for OCP! –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 1:00
    
@Billy: the "O" part of SOLID, thanks! –  Lorenzo Dec 16 '10 at 1:05
    
StackExchange broke your link :( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solid_%28object-oriented_design%29 –  Billy ONeal Dec 16 '10 at 1:13
    
@Billy: oops... it ate the last parenthesis. This one should be work –  Lorenzo Dec 16 '10 at 1:17
1  

Test your code like someone who would use it after reading the documentation. Do not test anything based on knowledge you have because you have written or read the code. You want to make sure that your code behaves as expected.

In the best case you should be able to use your tests as examples, doctests in Python are a good example for this.

If you follow these guidelines changing the implementation shouldn't be an issue.

Also in my experience it is good practice to test each "layer" of your application. You will have atomic units, which in itself have no dependencies and you will have units which depend on other units until you eventually get to the application which in itself is a unit.

You should test each layer, do not rely on the fact that by testing unit A you also test unit B which unit A depends on (the rule applies to inheritance as well.) This, too, should be treated as an implementation detail, even though you might feel as if you are repeating yourself.

Keep in mind that once written tests are unlikely to change while the code they test will change almost definitely.

In practice there is also the problem of IO and the outside world, so you want to use interfaces so that you can create mocks if necessary.

In more dynamic languages this is not that much of an issue, here you can use duck typing, multiple inheritance and mixins to compose test cases. If you start disliking inheritance in general you are probably doing it right.

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The big advantage of programming against interfaces when performing unit testing is that it allows you to isolate a piece of code from any dependencies you want to test separately or simulate during the testing.

An example I've mentioned here before somewhere is the use of an interface to access configuration values. Rather than looking directly at ConfigurationManager you can provide one or more interfaces that let you access config values. Normally you would supply an implementation that reads from the config file but for testing you can use one that just returns test values or throws exceptions or whatever.

Consider also your data access layer. Having your business logic tightly coupled to a particular data access implementation makes it hard to test without having a whole database handy with the data you need. If your data access is hidden behind interfaces you can supply just the data you need for the test.

Using interfaces increases the "surface area" available for testing allowing for finer grained tests that really do test individual units of your code.

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This screencast explains agile development and TDD in practice for c#.

By coding against an interface means that in your test, you can use a mock object instead of the real object. By using a good mock framework, you can do in your mock object whatever you like.

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