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How can i multipy 2 integers using bitwise operators. I found implementation here. Is there a better way of implementing multiplication ?

For example : 2 * 6 =12 must be performed using bitwise operators

NOTE : Numbers are arbitrary, not power of 2

Thanks

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Does it have to take arbitrary integers? There's an easy way to implement multiplication if one of the operands has to be a power of two. Also, is this a homework assignment or are you trying to implement multiplication in assembly on a processor with an instruction set that doesn't include multiplication (or both)? –  In silico Dec 16 '10 at 0:57
    
power of two implementation is easy, but in this case integers are not power of two they are arbitrary. And it is not Homework question, its an interview question. Please check the implementation i have attached. –  SuperMan Dec 16 '10 at 0:58
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7 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted
#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
   int a,b,result;     
   printf("nEnter the numbers to be multiplied :");
   scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);         // a>b
   result=0;
   while(b != 0)               // Iterate the loop till b==0
   {
      if (b&01)                // Bitwise &  of the value of b with 01
        {
          result=result+a;     // Add a to result if b is odd .
        }
      a<<=1;                   // Left shifting the value contained in 'a' by 1 
                               // multiplies a by 2 for each loop
      b>>=1;                   // Right shifting the value contained in 'b' by 1.
   }
   printf("nResult:%d",result);
}

Source

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if (b&01) uses a bitwise and, not a logical and. && is the logical and –  Peter Ajtai Oct 9 '11 at 3:20
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The Wikipedia entry on bitwise operator applications has some pseudo code, but it uses the addition operator as well as bitwise operators.

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Assembly algorithm: This follows directly from the fact that ax*7 = (ax*8)-ax.

mov     bx, ax          ;Save AX*1
shl     ax, 1           ;AX := AX*2
shl     ax, 1           ;AX := AX*4
shl     ax, 1           ;AX := AX*8
sub     ax, bx          ;AX := AX*7

Every shift step is a multiplication by 2

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In C# here is the implementation of the function.

    public static int Mul(int a, int b)
    {
        int r = 0;
        while (b != 0)
        {
            var temp = b & 1;

            if (temp!= 0)
            {
                r = r + a;
            }
            a= a << 1;
            b= b >> 1;
            if (temp == 0)
            {
                r = a;
                break;
            }
        }

        return r;
    }
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This answer contains a mistake. I submitted an edit, asking a moderator to remove the mistake, and this was his response: Edits that change code in answers are almost always rejected. You need to either leave a comment under the answer, or a new answer of your own. The mistake in the above code is if (temp == 0). The entire if statement including the break should be removed. To see this, call the function with inputs of 1 and 4: Mul(1, 4), and the return value will be 2. Clearly 1 x 4 is not 2. –  Barzee Nov 15 '13 at 1:14
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This one is purely with bit-wise operations.

public int bitwiseMultiply(int a, int b) {
    if (a ==0  || b == 0) {
        return 0 ; 
    }


    if (a == 1 ) {
        return b ; 
    } else if (b == 1) {
        return a ; 
    }


    int result = 0 ; // not needed, just for test
    int initA = a ; 
    boolean isORNeeded = false ; 
    while (b != 0 ) {

        if (b == 1) {
            break ; 
        }
        if ((b & 1) == 1) {// carry needed, odd number
            result += initA ; // test, not needed
            isORNeeded = true ; 

        }

        a <<= 1 ; // double the a
        b >>= 1 ; // half the b
        System.out.println("a=["+a+"], b=["+b+"], result=["+result+"]") ;   
    }   

    return (isORNeeded ? (a | initA) : a)  ; // a + result ; 

}
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I came here looking for this question and I find Zengr's answer correct. Thanks Zengr! But there is one modification I would want to see which is getting rid of the '+' operator in his code. This should make multiplication of two arbitrary numbers using NO ARITHMETIC OPERATORS but all bitwise.

Zengr's solution first:

#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
   int a,b,result;     
   printf("nEnter the numbers to be multiplied :");
   scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);         // a>b
   result=0;
   while(b != 0)               // Iterate the loop till b==0
   {
        if (b&01)                // Bitwise &  of the value of b with 01
        {
          result=result+a;     // Add a to result if b is odd .
        }
        a<<=1;                   // Left shifting the value contained in 'a' by 1 
                           // multiplies a by 2 for each loop
        b>>=1;                   // Right shifting the value contained in 'b' by 1.
   }
   printf("nResult:%d",result);
}

My Answer would be:

#include<stdio.h>
main()
{
   int a,b,result;     
   printf("nEnter the numbers to be multiplied :");
   scanf("%d%d",&a,&b);         // a>b
   result=0;
   while(b != 0)               // Iterate the loop till b==0
   {
        if (b&01)                // Bitwise &  of the value of b with 01
        {
          result=add(result,a);     // Add a to result if b is odd .
        }
        a<<=1;                   // Left shifting the value contained in 'a' by 1 
                                // multiplies a by 2 for each loop
        b>>=1;                   // Right shifting the value contained in 'b' by 1.
   }
   printf("nResult:%d",result);
}

where I would write add() as:

int Add(int x, int y)
{
    // Iterate till there is no carry  
    while (y != 0)
    {
        // carry now contains common set bits of x and y
        int carry = x & y;  

        // Sum of bits of x and y where at least one of the bits is not set
        x = x ^ y; 

        // Carry is shifted by one so that adding it to x gives the required sum
        y = carry << 1;
    }
    return x;
}

or recursively adding as:

int Add(int x, int y)
{
    if (y == 0)
        return x;
    else
        return Add( x ^ y, (x & y) << 1);
}

source for addition code: http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/add-two-numbers-without-using-arithmetic-operators/

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    #include<stdio.h>
    void main()
    {
        int n,m,i,j,x,large,small,t1,m2,result,a1,a2,a3,c,c1,c2,r,r1,la,re;


            printf("Enter two numbers\n");
            scanf("%d%d",&n,&m);
            result=0;

            if(n>m)
            {
                large=n;
                small=m;
            }
            else
            {
                large=m;
                small=n;

            }

            c=0;

            while(small)
            {
               t1=small;
                t1&=1;

                if(t1==1)
                {
                    printf("\n %d",large);
                    la=large;
                    re=result;
                    m2=0;
                    r1=1;
                    while(re||la||c)
                    {
                        a2=la;
                        a2&=1;
                        a3=re;
                        a3&=1;

                        c1=a2&a3;
                        r=a3^a2;

                        c2 =r&c;
                        r^=c;
                        if(c1||c2)
                            c=1;
                        else
                            c=0;


                        result&=~r1;
                        x=r;
                        m2>>=1;
                        while(m2)
                        {
                            r<<=1;
                            m2>>=1;
                        }

                        result|=r;
                            la>>=1;
                            re>>=1;
                            r1<<=1;
                            m2=r1;
                    }

                }
            large<<=1;
            small>>=1;

            }
            printf("\n%dX%d= %d\n",n,m,result);

    }
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