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I did all sorts of debugging and referred to a multitude of sources and can't figure this out on my own. I just started working with OOP in PHP and I'm trying to write a poker hand dealer. I attempt to use a recursive function and a loop and and an if else algorithm to avoid creating duplicates in the pokerHand array. My idea of how this code should work is that when a new pokerHand object is created the __construct function will be automatically called (that's the only reason i know of to use a constructor, but i think there's more to it). Then within a do while loop the code initializes a variable $rand which is a rand number between 1 & 52 and in_array checks to see if that "card" has already been entered in the array. If the card has been dealt the __construct function is supposed to call itself to produce another card until a novel card has been dealt before storing it in the array.

I am just starting out as a coder and any feedback on my code here will be of immeasurable value to me and I thank you in advance.

<?php
 class pokerHand {
    private $_pokerHand = array();
    private $_counter = 0;


    public function __construct (){

        do{

            if  (in_array ($rand = rand(1,52), $this->_pokerHand) ){
                return public function __construct();
            } else {
                $this->_pokerHand[] = $rand;
                $this->counter++;    
            }
        } while ($this->_counter < 5)


    public function showHand(){
        print_r ($this->_pokerHand);
    } 

 }




$obj = new pokerHand();
$obj => showHand();
?>
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You you don't call __construct (well, hardly ever) -- it's called automatically when the new keyword is used to create a new object.

While you could certainly use recursion in this case, it seems to me that it's overly complicating things.

Try something along the lines of:

public function __construct (){

    $this->cards = array();
    while(count($this->cards) < 5){
        $card = rand(1,52);
        while(in_array($card, $this->cards)){
            $card = rand(1,52);   
        }
        $this->cards[] = $card;
    }
}

If you really want to use recursion (*cough*homework*cough*) you could generate a hand like this:

public function makeHand($hand=null){
   if (! is_array($hand)) $hand = array();
   if (count($hand) == 5) return $hand;
   $card = rand(1,52);
   while(in_array($card, $hand)) $card=rand(1,52);
   $hand[] = $card;
   return $this->makeHand($hand);
}

public function __construct(){
   $this->hand = $this->makeHand();
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Better avoid the iteration and do something like this: $deck = range(1,52); shuffle($deck); $this->cards = array_slice($deck, 0, 5); –  scoates Dec 16 '10 at 3:31
    
@scoates - that's a perfectly valid approach, but I don't see why it's better. It's certainly more costly memory-wise, and shuffle() may or may not cost more processor cycles than a simple loop. –  timdev Dec 16 '10 at 3:37
    
It's better because it's faster and it doesn't "certainly" use more memory as you guessed. codepad.org/mEBvBZPD vs. codepad.org/Ys18Loi4 Unless you have a really good, objective (not subjective like a hunch about memory) reason to not use built-in functions, they should be used. –  scoates Dec 16 '10 at 3:57
    
Side note: the condition on your inner while loop has the logic inverted; it should be while(in_array($card, $this->cards)){ –  scoates Dec 16 '10 at 3:58
    
the memory usage between using your shuffle method and the while method seems statistically insignificant, while the simple loops perform better on time: codepad.org/GMXRHFhs –  jorelli Dec 16 '10 at 4:42
  1. This is not how you call a method:

    return public function __construct();
    

    It should be $this->__construct();

  2. Class constructors don't actually return anything. They are called as an object is initialized but they don't have return values.

  3. This:

    $obj => showHand();
    

    should be

    $obj->showHand();
    
  4. You're missing a ; after your while, and you're missing a } after that semicolon to close your __construct() method body.

  5. I don't know if it's legal to call PHP constructors recursively. Try placing it in a separate method and calling that recursively instead. Or just totally do away with recursion and use a normal while loop.

share|improve this answer
    
You can call constructors recursively, but it won't do what he thinks it will do. You can't return a secondary object (you can, however capture its member values). IMO, the real solution to this problem is to use a factory method, php.net/range, and php.net/shuffle –  scoates Dec 16 '10 at 3:26
    
don't confuse the boy with your flamboyant misunderstanding of vocabulary words. range and shuffle are not factory methods. A factory method is a method that creates an object and is typically written to be overridden in a subclass. They're also totally overused. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern –  jorelli Dec 16 '10 at 4:49
    
@jorelli: Uh I think he meant "a factory method, range() and shuffle()" as a list of three things to use... –  BoltClock Dec 16 '10 at 5:19
    
the term "factory method" has a specific meaning. What he's referring to are built in methods. These terms are universale. The entire world of programming is manipulating text and knowing the semantics of the words you're using down to the most minute detail; to just use terminology in any way you feel is a recipe for confusion. –  jorelli Dec 16 '10 at 5:48
    
BoltClock is right. I put the comma in there on purpose. "…factory method, range, and shuffle." –  scoates Dec 16 '10 at 13:02

as pointed out by BoltClock, you don't recursively call construct.

Anyway, you don't need recursion here.

    do{

        if  (in_array ($rand = rand(1,52), $this->_pokerHand))
            continue;

        $this->_pokerHand[] = $rand;
        $this->counter++;    

    } while ($this->_counter < 5)
share|improve this answer

The constructor is the function that creates a new pokerHand object, or rather it is the method (function) called to initialise the object, you should probably not call it directly.

In that example, the recursion is unnecessary, the loop suffices.

class pokerHand {
    private $_pokerHand = array();
    private $_counter = 0;

    public function __construct (){
        do {
            if  (!in_array($rand = rand(1,52), $this->_pokerHand)) {
                $this->_pokerHand[] = $rand;
                $this->_counter++;
            }
        } while ($this->_counter < 5);
    }

    public function showHand(){
        print_r ($this->_pokerHand);
    }
}

$obj = new pokerHand();
$obj->showHand();
share|improve this answer
$this->_pokerHand[] = $rand;

I'm no PHP wiz but it looks like you are missing a variable in the brackets after pokerhand to specify which index you are placing a value into.

share|improve this answer
1  
In PHP, that simply means push $rand to the array. –  BoltClock Dec 16 '10 at 3:19
    
That's essentially saying "push $rand on to $this->_pokerHand[]" -- perfectly valid syntax. –  timdev Dec 16 '10 at 3:19
    
@timdev Thank you for the clarification, well noted. –  Bnjmn Dec 16 '10 at 3:26

I believe the following code does what you are wanting to do, using a recursive method, however this is not on the __construct which I believe is confusing.

class pokerHand {

  private $_pokerHand = array();
  private $_counter = 0;

  public function __construct (){
    do{
      $this->_pokerHand[] = $this->pickCard();
      $this->_counter++;
    } while ($this->_counter < 5);
  }

  private function pickCard(){
    if  (in_array ($rand = rand(1,52), $this->_pokerHand) ){
      return $this->pickCard();
    } else {
      return $rand;
    }
  }

  public function showHand(){
    print_r ($this->_pokerHand);
  }
}

$obj = new pokerHand();
$obj->showHand();

I have used a separate method for picking a card which makes things far easier to follow, separating out the loop and card picking.

share|improve this answer
  1. No need for recursion here. It's a fixed size. Just iterate. Recursion is more useful when you're dealing with trees or variable-sized operations. In this case, you know the size is fixed ahead of time.
  2. Don't stick that 5 in the middle of a method body. If you change the card game (i.e. the business rules, in douche-speak), what then? By sticking the hand size in a static variable, you can now inherit this class and redeclare the hand size, but everything still works as intended. Note that this maintains the rule that all hands are of equal size, which may not be a very good rule, e.g. if you play a game that involves dealing the entire deck out to all players and you have 5 players, such that not all players have the same size hand.
  3. You don't actually need to create a count object. Since you're just filling an array, you already have the count; it's the size of the array. Get rid of that entirely and just use the count() function.
  4. It's good that you understand that an assignment expression evaluates to the assigned value, but don't try to write slick code. It's hard to read. "Elegance" for vanity; clarity for sanity.
  5. The "public" keyword in that return statement doesn't make any sense. Nor does the function keyword. You're not returning the function when you recurse, you're calling it.
  6. The "do" keyword is evil and stupid and should be avoided when possible. Use a "do" when you want to ensure that the body of your loops is always executed at minimum one time, regardless of the evaluation of your predicate. Under every other circumstance, cut that do doo-doo out.

write it like this:

<?php
class pokerHand
{
    private $_pokerHand = array();
    private static $handsize = 5;

    public function __construct ()
    {   
        while(count($this->_pokerHand) < self::$handsize)
        {   
            $card = rand(1, 52);
            if(!in_array($card, $this->_pokerHand))
            {   
                array_push($this->_pokerHand, $card);
            }   
        }   
    }   

    public function showHand()
    {   
        print_r($this->_pokerHand);
    }   
}


$hand = new pokerHand();
$hand->showHand();
?>

I could easily have truncated that a litte bit so that the while loop looks like so:

    while(count($this->_pokerHand) < self::$handsize)
        if(!in_array($card = rand(1, 52), $this->_pokerHand))
            array_push($this->_pokerHand, $card);

But really. Look at that thing. So hard to look at. You go back to that in a month and you'll sit there figuring out what it does; executing the program in your head. Just put more code in there. People get all wound up about "elegance" when in reality all they're doing is wanking off to how short they can write a program.

Meanwhile the Lisp community is laughing their dicks off because everything every other language does can be done in a single amazing Lisp macro that only takes three lines to express but is impossible for 99% of coders to comprehend. But I digress. The point is that "elegance" is often misunderstood as meaning requiring less typing for the programmer, when in reality elegance in code is the marriage of efficiency and clarity; not a measure of code shortness. Writing code for other coders is like the programming equivalent of playing jazz. A million chords and only three people in the audience. How awesome. Pop musicians are successful because they appeal to animal instincts. Programmers are successful when they help a hungry person find a cheeseburger. So code for users; not for coders.

Anyway, I hate it when people get on their soap box and don't just answer the question that was asked, so you can write it recursively like this, but it's stupid:

<?php
class pokerHand
{
    private $_pokerHand = array();
    private static $handsize = 5;

    public function __construct()
    {   
        if(count($this->_pokerHand) >= self::$handsize)
            return $this;

        if(!in_array($card = rand(1, 52), $this->_pokerHand))
            $this->_pokerHand[] = $card;

        return $this->__construct();
    }   

    public function showHand()
    {   
        print_r($this->_pokerHand);
    }   
}


$hand = new pokerHand();
$hand->showHand();
?>

When you're writing a recursive function, the first statement you should write is the statement that gets you out of the recursion. In this case, it's return $this;. That was absent from your solution.

This is the first time I've ever written a recursive constructor. I didn't even know you could do that.

share|improve this answer
    
Keep it clean, profanity is not appropriate outside of comments, and excessive profanity is unwelcome here. –  meagar Dec 21 '10 at 21:10

Although this may get downvoted since it doesn't directly answer the question, I wanted to point this out to you since you are a fresh programmer. The __construct is generally only used for initializing an object and there should really never be any real logic within the __construct. The reason for this is any mechanics that are embedded within that function are then going to have to be rewritten into another method within the class, so now you will have duplicate code within the class which will make it harder to maintain.

Also, just as another side note to help, you should think about your actual class and object relationships when you are designing the infrastructure. In this case your "deck" is within the pokerHand class. This doesn't make much sense since the deck is independent of the actual poker hand. A much more usable infrastructure would have a class that handles the Deck and the pokerHand object would take cards out of the Deck.

Again, this can sometimes depend on the programmers personal preferences with development, but atleast pointing out this approach may help you design your object relationships better on future projects.

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