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How to rotate an integer array by i times using swap function only in linear time.

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5  
Please elaborate your question a bit. What dimension has the array? What do you mean by "rotating an array"? Give an example input and output. Consider using punctuation and capital letters where appropriate. –  Sven Marnach Dec 16 '10 at 3:55
    
What have you tried? How does it not work? IOW, you need to try first before we help (we're not going to write it form you) –  KevinDTimm Dec 16 '10 at 3:57
    
@sven suppose input array is {1,2,3,4,5} output array after one right rotation is {5,1,2,3,4}. –  algo-geeks Dec 16 '10 at 3:57
    
@kevin for rotating it i times we can do it in o(n^2) times but i want o(n) complexity. –  algo-geeks Dec 16 '10 at 3:58
    
don't know why someone down voted my answer, but it's possible with a easy small algorithm in O(n)! See my answer for details. –  Stuck Dec 16 '10 at 4:46
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13 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can do this in linear time by using a reverse() helper.

// rotate array of size=size, by n positions
void rotate(int array[], int size, int n)
{
  // reverse array[0...size-1]
  reverse(array, 0, size-1);

  // reverse A[0...n-1]
  reverse(array, 0, n-1);

  // reverse A[n...size-1]
  reverse(array, n, size-1);
}

// reverse elements in the array[pos_from ... pos_to]
void reverse(int array[], int pos_from, int pos_to)
{
   ...
}

Implementing reverse(int array[], int pos_from, int pos_to) using swaps is left as an exercise for the reader. Hint: This can be done in linear time.

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I am just curious why does it work all the time –  daydreamer Jan 30 at 1:32
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Let us say we have a function called arr_reverse(arr,i,j) which reverses the elements of the array arr between index i and j using the swap function.

Example:

arr = {1,2,3,4,5} 
i = 0
j = 2

then the function will return:

{3,2,1,4,5} 
 ^^^^^

Implementing this function is straight forward and is O(N).

Now let's use this function in rotating the array.

arr     = {1,2,3,4,5} // input array
k       = 2 // amount of right rotation
result  = {4,5,1,2,3} // expected result 
l       = 5 // length of array.

Step 1: Call arr_reverse(arr,l-k,l-1) which is arr_reverse(arr,3,4)
we get {1,2,3,5,4} 
              ^^^

Step 2: Call arr_reverse(arr,0,l-k-1) which is arr_reverse(arr,0,2)
we get {3,2,1,5,4}
        ^^^^^     

Step 3: Call arr_reverse(arr,0,l-1) which is arr_reverse(arr,0,4)
we get {4,5,1,2,3} 
        ^^^^^^^^^

The entire process makes use of arr_reverse 3 times, making it O(N)

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I think you made a typo in Step 2 and 3 of your example, where you show the result. You have the 4 and 5 flipped from what they should be. –  Nixuz Dec 16 '10 at 5:32
    
@Nixuz: Thanks for noticing. –  codaddict Dec 16 '10 at 5:42
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Here's a better solution, of a different nature than the others. It involves fewer array swaps than the others. Python:

import fractions
# rotates an array in-place i positions to the left, in linear time
def rotate(arr,i):
    n = len(arr)
    reps = fractions.gcd(n,i)
    swaps = n / reps
    for start in xrange(reps):
        ix = start
        tmp = arr[ix]
        for s in xrange(swaps-1):
            previx = ix
            ix = (ix + i) % n
            arr[previx] = arr[ix]
        arr[ix] = tmp
    return arr
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a naive pseudocode implementation:

for (n = 0; n < i; n++) {
    for (j = array.length-1; j > n; j--)
        swap(j, j-1)
}

Repeatedly moves the last element to the front, stopping before it moves anything previously moved to the front

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1  
i tried same soln but i want it in o(n) –  algo-geeks Dec 16 '10 at 4:02
8  
@prp - Might have mentioned that in the question then, eh? –  Brad Mace Dec 16 '10 at 4:12
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Better use a direct and simple function, complexity N:

int rotate(int* a,int DIM,int rn,int* b) {
    int i; //counter 
    for(i=0;i<DIM;i++){ // looping through the array
        b[(i+rn)%len]=a[i]; // copying the values in the b array=a shifted with rn(+ for right or - for left shifting
}
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why only swap function?

O(n) in time and space:

var rotateCount = 1;
var arr = new Array(1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10);

tmp = new Array(arr.length);
for (var i = 0; i<arr.length; i++)
    tmp[(i+rotateCount)%arr.length]=arr[i];
arr = tmp;

alert(arr);
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why down vote?? This code works! –  Stuck Dec 16 '10 at 4:32
    
This code doesn't work. Try rotateCount = 8, it produces: 9,10,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,1. –  Nixuz Dec 16 '10 at 4:54
    
@Nixuz: fixed that bug –  Stuck Dec 16 '10 at 5:13
    
Still broken, try rotateCount = 3, it'll produce: 4,5,6,7,8,9,10,2,3,1. –  Nixuz Dec 16 '10 at 5:19
    
Also, you really should test your code before posting it. It took me 3 seconds to test this and see that it doesn't work. –  Nixuz Dec 16 '10 at 5:20
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Using linear time O(2N+m), and constant space O(4). m = GCD(n, p)

It's up to 50% faster than the swapping approach, because swapping requires writing O(N) times to a temporary.

http://www.eis.mdx.ac.uk/staffpages/r_bornat/oldteaching/I2A/slides%209%20circshift.pdf

for (m=0, count=0; count!=n; m++) {
    type t=A[m];
    for (i=m, j=m+p; j!=m; i=j, j = j+p<n ? j+p : j+p-n, count++)
        A[i]=A[j];
    A[i]=t; count++;
}
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/* * To change this template, choose Tools | Templates * and open the template in the editor. */ package rotateinlineartime;

/** * * @author Sunshine */ public class Rotator {

void reverse(int a[], int n) {
    for (int i = 0; i <= n - 1; i++) {
        int temp;
        temp = a[i];
        a[i] = a[n - 1];
        a[n - 1] = temp;
        n--;
    }

    printArray(a);
}

void printArray(int a[]) {
    for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) {
        System.out.println(a[i]);
    }
}

}

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/* Q: How can we shift/rotate an array in place?
A: "in place" means O(1) space complexity, so we need to do some trick
 */

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

void ArrayRotate(int a[], int n, int k)
{
    if (n < 1 || k % n == 0 ) return;

    k %= n;
    if (k < 0) k += n;

    reverse(a, a+k);
    reverse(a+k, a+n);
    reverse(a, a+n);
}

void PrintArray(int a[], int n)
{
    for ( int i = 0 ; i < n; ++i)
        cout << a[i] << " ";
    cout << endl;
}

int main()
{
    int a[] = { 1, 2 , 3, 4, 5 };
    int n = sizeof(a)/sizeof (a[0]);

    PrintArray(a, n);
    ArrayRotate(a, n, 2);
    PrintArray(a, n);

    return 0;
}
/* Output:
1 2 3 4 5
3 4 5 1 2
 */
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using only swap, following is a C++ implementation

template<class T>
void rotate_array(std::vector<T> *array, int i) {
  int n = array->size();
  i = i % n;
  int gcd_n_i = gcd(i, n);
  for (int j = 0; j < gcd_n_i; j++) {
    T first_element = array->at(j);
    for (int k = j; (k + i) % n != j; k = (k + i) % n) {
      std::swap(array->at(k), array->at((k + i) % n));
    }
  }
}

You can read more about it at http://pointer-overloading.blogspot.in/2013/09/algorithms-rotating-one-dimensional.html

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void reverse_array(int a[], int start, int end){

    while(start < end){     
            int temp =  a[start];
            a[start] = a[end];
            a[end] = temp;
            start++;
            end--;
    }

}

void rotate_array(int a[], int pivot, int len){
    int i;
    /*Reverse the whole array */
    reverse_array(a, 0, len);

    /* Reverse from 0 to pivot and pivot to end */
    reverse_array(a,0, pivot);
    reverse_array(a,pivot+1,len);

}

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Here's a small snippet thats works in O(n), written in JavaScript. The keyconcept is, that you always have to work with the replaced item.

function swap(arr, a, v) {
    var old = arr[a];
    arr[a] = v;
    return old;
}

function rotate(arr, n) {
    var length = arr.length;
    n = n % length;
    if(!n) return arr;

    for(var cnt = 0, 
            index = 0,
            value = arr[index],
            startIndex = index; 
        cnt < length; 
        cnt++) {

        // Calc next index
        var nextIndex = mapIndex(index, n, length);

        // Swap value with next
        value = swap(arr, nextIndex, value)

        if(nextIndex == startIndex) {
            startIndex = index = mapIndex(index, 1, length);
            value = arr[index];
        } else {
            index = nextIndex;
        }
    }

    return arr;
}

function mapIndex(index, n, length) {
    return (index - n + length) % length;
}

console.log(rotate([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9], 5))
console.log(rotate([1,2,3,4,5,6], 2))
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An O(1) method of accomplishing this, in python:

class OffsetList(list):
    __slots__ = 'offset'
    def __init__(self, init=[], offset=-1):
        super(OffsetList, self).__init__(init)
        self.offset = offset
    def __getitem__(self, key):
        return super(OffsetList, self).__getitem__(key + self.offset)
    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        return super(OffsetList, self).__setitem__(key + self.offset, value)
    def __delitem__(self, key):
        return super(OffsetList, self).__delitem__(key + self.offset)
    def index(self, *args):
        return super(OffsetList, self).index(*args) - self.offset

This is based on this answer about using a 1-based list in python.

This does have the slight glitch that if you attempt to index an item off the end of the list, it will return items from the (new) beginning, and negative indicies less than the size minus the offset won't work.

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