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I have created thread pool which have 5 threads. Both of them will start when my application start up. The problem is I created so many objects in thread loop call back function on each threads, and the memory is increase by second when app running, this is thread loop call back function:

void ThreadLoop(){
   while(true){
         var checkItems = _workItems.Where(w=>w.ActivedTime > 3).ToList();
         foreach(var i in checkItems){
             _workItems[i.Id].ActivedTime = 0;
             _workItems[i.Id].ExecutePostBack();
         }
         //Recreate new _workItems dictionary
        _workItems = _workItems.Where(w=>w.ActivedTime > 0).ToDictionary();
        // Sleep thread to free up momory
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        // Call Grab collector free memory
        GC.Collect();
   }
}

I'm confusing that, is calling GC.Collect() on each threads like that good or bad ? Dose it cause bad performence ?

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3 Answers 3

If you have to ask yourself whether to call GC.Collect, the answer is almost definitely "no". The GC is designed to run automatically as needed, and invoking it yourself says "I know better than the GC itself about when it should run". Anyone who doesn't know the details of GC is more likely to be wrong than right, and will actually make things worse.

The best course of action is almost always to let GC take care of itself.

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Thanks for ur advise. But when I add GC.Collect(), the memory is about 100 mb when I run thread pool with 1000 work items on each threads, during 2 hours. but when I remove GC.Collect() (Let .Net collect for me) the memory up second by second and rarely down, it's about 300~400 mb which same work items during 2 hours. Is .Net grab collector working worse ? How to make .net grab collector work better in my case ? –  UmbalaAZ Dec 16 '10 at 4:09
    
GC runs when it's needed, which is when memory is low. If you have lots of memory, it's possible for GC not to run til the app closes, if at all. The app will appear to use steadily more memory. This doesn't mean that it's running "worse" -- just that there's a bunch of stuff that hasn't needed collection yet. –  cHao Dec 16 '10 at 4:16
    
It's impossible to wait for close App to free memory, How can I raise to GC that I need free death objects and make GC run earlier and safely without forcing it collect immediately ? –  UmbalaAZ Dec 16 '10 at 4:30
    
Is there a reason you need to? Eventually the app's going to need more memory than there is, and when it does, it'll run a GC cycle. If you need to restrict the app to use less memory, then do so...but forcing GC to run, just to keep that number low, isn't going to do you any good -- and can actually mess with generations and make it not work as well when it runs on its own. Just let it do its thing and trust that it'll work -- in every case you're likely to run into, it'll be just fine. –  cHao Dec 16 '10 at 7:07

It is ill-advised to call GC.Collect unless you really need to such as in some corner-cases with COM interop. At best, you're invoking the GC more than it needs to, at worst you could be promoting otherwise short-lived objects into higher GC generations which makes them more expensive to clean up later.

The GC is triggered upon memory pressure when memory is allocated, not time. So it's not uncommon to see a temporary spike in memory that hangs around for a long time if you're no longer allocating new objects. In this case it might be ok to call GC.Collect but I'd avoid calling it in a loop if you can.

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I have to post the same comment for you,guys. I also want to hear your opinion: "when I add GC.Collect(), the memory is about 100 mb when I run thread pool with 1000 work items on each threads, during 2 hours. but when I remove GC.Collect() (Let .Net collect for me) the memory up second by second and rarely down, it's about 300~400 mb which same work items during 2 hours. Is .Net grab collector working worse ? How to make .net grab collector work better in my case ?" –  UmbalaAZ Dec 16 '10 at 4:18

You don't need to call GC.Collect() in most cases, except in rare situations (and I think yours is not). See here for more explanation: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ricom/archive/2004/11/29/271829.aspx

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Thanks for ur advise. But when I add GC.Collect(), the memory is about 100 mb when I run thread pool with 1000 work items on each threads, during 2 hours. but when I remove GC.Collect() (Let .Net collect for me) the memory up second by second and rarely down, it's about 300~400 mb which same work items during 2 hours. Is .Net grab collector working worse ? How to make .net grab collector work better in my case ? –  UmbalaAZ Dec 16 '10 at 4:08
    
If your performance tests show otherwise, by all means do what you believe is best. .NET VM is supposed to tune itself and perform better in the long run -- that's the theory anyway. –  muratgu Dec 16 '10 at 4:13
    
Uhm, I agree, I will choose solution after testing and measuring. –  UmbalaAZ Dec 16 '10 at 4:17

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