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Just wondering, does it matter in which sequence the LINQ methods are added?

Eg.

using(MyDataContext context = new MyDataContext())
{
   var user = context.Users
                     .Where(u => u.UserName.StartsWith("t"))
                     .OrderByDescending(u => u.CreatedDate)
                     .FirstOrDefault();
}

and this are completely the same?

using(MyDataContext context = new MyDataContext())
{
   var user = context.Users
                     .OrderByDescending(u => u.CreatedDate)
                     .Where(u => u.UserName.StartsWith("t"))
                     .FirstOrDefault();
}

Of course I can have all methods tested one by one, but I'd like to have some general idea about the logic.

So:

  • Other than methods like FirstOrDefault(), ToList() and other methods that really trigger the execution is it of any importance to have some type of order in the LINQ statement?

Thanks again!

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In such cases I just compare the queries that are produced and execute them on the database manually to further analyse the execution plan. – Yves M. Dec 16 '10 at 8:36
up vote 10 down vote accepted

In LINQ to SQL, I'd expect these two queries to be the same - they should end up with the same query plan, at least, even if not the exact same SQL.

In LINQ to Objects, they would behave very differently. Imagine you had a million users, but only two of them had usernames starting with "t". in the first form, you'd be filtering and then sorting those two users... in the second form, it would need to sort everything before it started filtering.

Of course there are other situations where the ordering matters too - in particular, if you have a Select half way down and then a Where clause, then you'll be filtering on different things. Imagine this:

var query = Enumerable.Range(-20, 30)
                      .Select(x => -x)
                      .Where(x => x > 5);

vs

var query = Enumerable.Range(-20, 30)
                      .Where(x => x > 5)
                      .Select(x => -x);

In the first example the results will be "20, 19, 18, ... 6" whereas in the second query the results will be "-6, -7, -8, -9, -10". Hugely different!

share|improve this answer

It depends on which LINQ provider you're using. In the case of LINQ to SQL, the expression tree will parse down to the same underlying SQL query in either case. However, with a less intelligent provider you might find that doing the .Where() first would be more efficient, as it would filter your objects before sorting them, which could make quite a difference with a large number of entities.

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In general, yes it does matter. You can get different performance and/or different results.

In your specific example the order won't change the result. For most providers such as LINQ to SQL, and LINQ to Entities it also won't make any difference at all - the same SQL will be generated.

For other providers the different order might change the performance characteristics, but how it does depends on the specific provider. For example I don't think LINQ to Objects will have the same performance for both queries.

share|improve this answer

How about using Sql Profiler? That'll give the correct answer.

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I'm not 100 % sure but I think the second one is slower since you do the sorting on a larger set of data. If you filter first you will remove some of the elements this making the sorting faster. However, the result should be the same.

EDIT: Since this looks like linq-to-sql (if you're not using another linq provider) it should boil down to the same query being executed in this example. But there are situations where the ordering matters in linq-to-sql as well (see Jon's example). However, the only way to be 100 % sure is to use the profiler to investigate the generated sql query (but in this example I don't think there are any difference).

share|improve this answer
    
@Tomas: This is LINQ to SQL, by the looks of it... I'd expect either the query generation at the client or the server-side optimizer to spot that. – Jon Skeet Dec 16 '10 at 8:36
    
@Jon: That's true, for linq to sql they should generate the same sql. I only considered the linq part and didn't reflect over the DataContext. The thing with this is that you can't be sure about that, or can you? The only way is to use the profiler to really inspect the generate sql query. – Tomas Jansson Dec 16 '10 at 8:41
    
@Tomas: I'd be reasonably confident in this case - but I think it's a good idea to see what sort of queries your LINQ is producing anyway :) – Jon Skeet Dec 16 '10 at 8:43
    
@Jon: I'm pretty sure about it to since this query is pretty straight forward. Good example with ordering regards to Where and Select. – Tomas Jansson Dec 16 '10 at 8:45
    
Pretty sure? ;) Considering the cost of checking your SQL over having a query run rampant because it orders a large set of data before the where clause, I'd check the SQL – Ray Booysen Dec 16 '10 at 9:10

I thinks it's about LINQ to XXXX provider. Who wrote the provider could say what it can do (about optimization and etc). Even it's possible to give different results (just in translations) in another version of the same LINQ provider.

In a simple word LINQ providers are just translators, so you should ask this question from the creator of the LINQ provider that you use now.

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It might have performance issues. In your case, the first example will be best, because on the second one you first sort the entire list before filtering. You even sort all the ones you don't need, and then you remove the unwanted parts. On the first you remove all you don't need, then you sort the sub-set that will (probably) be much smaller.

so for this exact query, the result are the same, but for a big set of data, the first one will be the fastest one.

share|improve this answer
    
@Øyvind: As per my comments on other answers: this looks like LINQ to SQL, where the execution flow isn't nearly as prescribed as it would be for LINQ to Objects. I'd expect the two to perform equivalently even on huge amounts of data - because the SQL query optimizer should sort it out. – Jon Skeet Dec 16 '10 at 8:38
    
@Jon - When reviewing the question I agree with you that this looks like LINQ to SQL, and then of course you are correct. On LINQ to Objects however, the difference will be critical. – Øyvind Bråthen Dec 16 '10 at 8:52

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