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In many examples, it is described that you can use scala.io.Source to read a whole file like this:

val str = scala.io.Source.fromFile("test.txt").mkString()

But closing the underlying stream is not mentioned. Why does Scala not provide a convenient way to do that such as with clause in Python? It looks useful but not difficult.

Is there any other better way to do that safely in Scala, i means to read a whole file?

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Is it right to use Source this way not closing the underlying stream? –  woods Dec 17 '10 at 5:13
2  
If you read the code of scala.io.Source, you will find that in fact it leaves the work of closing underlying stream to you. Amazing! –  woods Dec 22 '10 at 7:57

2 Answers 2

For the sake of completeness

val testTxtSource = scala.io.Source.fromFile("test.txt")
val str = testTxtSource.mkString()
testTxtSource.close()

Should get things done.

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Shouldn't this be in a try block and the close() in the finally block? –  robinst May 23 '12 at 13:28
    
@robinst That would be a good thing and I agree with Daniel's answer (ie don't use scala.io.Source at all) However, it has come in useful at our Dojos where we do not write production code. Also, I would use an ARM library (rather than try catch) because close() could also throw an exception and I find it awkward to have a try catch finally within a finally. –  matyjas May 29 '12 at 12:18

Scala's io library was just hack done to provide support for limited needs. There was an effort to provide a well-thought io library to Scala, which is currently hosted at assembla, with a github repository as well.

If you are going to use I/O for anything more than reading the occasional file on short-lived processes, you'd better either use Java libraries, or look at the I/O support presently available in the compiler (which will require scala-compiler.jar to be distributed with the app).

As for automatic resource management, look at this question, or at this library (which is featured in the accepted answer at that question).

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