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I am figuring how signals work in C. Here is one of the examples taken from old exams:

#include<signal.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<errno.h>

//#include <sys/types.h>

void handler1(int sig) {
 printf("Phantom");
 exit(0);
}
int main()
{
   pid_t pid1;
   signal(SIGUSR1, handler1); //installing signal handler
   if((pid1 = fork()) == 0) { //forking
       printf("Ghost");
       exit(0);
   }
   kill(pid1, SIGUSR1);
   printf("Ninja");
   return 0;
}

So far, GCC gives me two answers Ghost Ninja & Ninja Phantom. Could it produce Ghost Phantom Ninja or any other combination made of 3 names ?

One way I see it could possibly produce 3 names is: Fork, run in Child, print Ghost, exit(0) => in Parent, accept/process signal and from signal Handler print Phantom, kill child, print Ninja. But I am not sure if my "theory" holds the ground.

Also, would the kill(pid1, SIGUSR1) invoke handler() ?

Thanks !

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Not an answer to the question as such, but you must never call printf() in a signal handler. –  JeremyP Dec 16 '10 at 11:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let's examine this line-by line. Set up a signal handler, then fork. The child prints "Ghost" and exits. The parent makes the child print "Phantom" and exit. Then the parent prints "Ninja".

So you've really got a race condition. If the parent fires its SIGUSR1 before the child prints "Ghost", then you'll get Phantom Ninja, or perhaps Ninja Phantom (does kill block?)

But, if you can't get the signal off in time, then you'll get Ghost Ninja as the child finishes before the parent signals. I don't think the reverse is possible.

Now it is conceivable that the signal could be exactly on time to hit between the printf and the exit, in which case Ghost would finish, followed by Phantom then Ninja - or the reverse again, I think.

It's really finicky and sensitive to OS timing.

@Everyone - not tested! Feel free to contradict me, but I'll be as interested to know why as the OP.

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"But, if you can't get the signal off in time, then you'll get Ghost Ninja as the child finishes before the parent signals. I don't think the reverse is possible." If child exits, will parent proceed to kill or will it first accept the signal from handler ??? –  newprint Dec 16 '10 at 9:12

Lets mark the lines with line numbers first as follows:

signal(SIGUSR1, handler1); //installing signal handler ---- 1
   if((pid1 = fork()) == 0) { //forking                ---- 2
       printf("Ghost");                                ---- 3
       exit(0);                                        ---- 4
 }
   kill(pid1, SIGUSR1);                                ---- 5
   printf("Ninja");                                    ---- 6

Now with the above code, if Child executes first and if 3 is executed first, then child is suspended and parent starts executing with 5. This will print GhostPhantomNinja

However, a definite order can not be determined.

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You have two non deterministic factors here, which are both depends on the OS: when will the context switching occur, and when will the signal arrive.

Since you can't control those, I'd answer that any order is possible. Try inserting wait() between command and see if you get the desired results.

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//#include <sys/types.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
void handler1(int sig) {
 printf("Phantom\n");
 waitpid(-1,NULL,0);
 //sexit(0);
}
int main()
{
   pid_t pid1;
   signal(SIGUSR1, handler1); //installing signal handler
        printf("my pid is %d ha ha parent..\n",getpid());
   //if((pid1 = fork()) == 0) { //forking
       pid1=fork();
       if(pid1==0)//in childe processs
       {
    printf("my pid is %d ha ha child..\n",getpid());
       printf("Ghost\n");
       sleep(6);
       exit(0);
   }
   else{
  //sleep(4); 
   kill(pid1, SIGUSR1);
   sleep(3);
   printf("Ninja\n");
   return 0;
}
}
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try this out..use sleep as i have used then understand how the os works,i mean how the scheduler works.. –  killer panda Dec 16 '10 at 12:44

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