Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →


Do you know about a library that allows us to generate UI by just stating that it should be generated?

I think there must be a person who have implemented a mechanism allowing us to transform code like this:

class Main {
    @Command
    int add(int a, int b) {
        return a+b;
    }
}

into, say, a dialog with 2 text fields and a button? Or into a webform? You've got the idea, right?

The type of UI and the language doesn't matter, if it allows us to simply say, "This should be a command" without those lots of XML files scattered all over the application.

And, btw, what do you think about this kind of meta-programming?

share|improve this question
    
Why could not a woman have implemented it? – Pete Kirkham Jan 18 '09 at 13:59
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Have you looked at Naked Objects?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it seems to be exactly the thing I'm looking for. – ansgri Jan 15 '09 at 13:34
    
Does that mean you can make this the accepted answer? ;-) – Andrew Swan Jan 15 '09 at 21:53
    
Naked Objects is now open source on .net, see nakedobjects.codeplex.com/license – Ian Ringrose Oct 19 '11 at 12:09

I have lost count of how many times I've seen variations of this implemented over the years. The common theme is annotating/supplementing your core obejcts with metadata and try to generate a UI on-the-fly from there. All attempts I have seen always end up with user interfaces that even the creator have problems liking. It also seems like there's no amount of meta-data you can add that will make these UI's nice.

The only exceptions that I have ever recalled seeing work half-decently is the key-value editor that lets you edit values for a fixed set of keys (this also works in a tree structure).

share|improve this answer
    
I've seen this pattern a few times in the insurance industry which is heavily forms-driven. It works, but it's ugly. – SteveD Oct 4 '09 at 13:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.