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I have this timer here:

timer = new Timer(delay, new ActionListener() {         
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            try {
                doWork();
            } catch (JMSException e1) {
                e1.printStackTrace();
            }               
        }
    });
    timer.start();

That calls this code:

public void doWork() throws JMSException {
    String fileContent = getFileContent();
    Session session = queue.getConnection().createSession(false, Session.AUTO_ACKNOWLEDGE);

    Destination dest = session.createQueue(queue.getName());
    MessageProducer producer = session.createProducer(dest);
    TextMessage message = session.createTextMessage();

    //Different and not less than to be able to create permanent producers
    for (int i = 0; i != numberOfMsgsInBurst; i++) {
        message.setText(fileContent);
        producer.send(message);
    }

    /*
     * Send a non-text control message indicating end of messages.
     */
    producer.send(session.createMessage());     
}

As far as I am experiencing, when doWork is called by the timer, it blocks the system (GUI, for instance). I want to be able to run this doWork method permanently (setting the numberOfMsgsInBurst to -1), so the producer would produce messages permanently. The problem I am having is that it is blocking the system, so the system stops responding.

Is there any way I could fire this event in a background thread?

Thanks, Oscar

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

javax.swing.Timers execute the ActionListener callback on the event dispatch thread. This means that your code must return quickly, otherwise the GUI will freeze.

If you want to run this task on a different thread you could consider using the java.util.Timer class instead. This will be cleaner and less resource-intensive than spawning a new Thread each time doWork is called (creating new Threads is expensive).

share|improve this answer
    
This is probably the best way. I didn't know about java.util.Timer. – Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 9:56

You can start the doWork() in a Thread:

 public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    Thread t = new Thread() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
           try {
             doWork();
           } catch (JMSException e1) {
             e1.printStackTrace();
           }
        }
    };
    t.start();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This has a disadvantage of starting a new thread each time the event fires. A nice solution otherwise. – Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 9:52
    
True, but as I understand the OP the doWork() might run endless anyway. – morja Dec 16 '10 at 9:54
    
Yes, it may run endless in some cases (the user may define if it should run for a given number of iterations or endlessly) – JSBach Dec 16 '10 at 9:58

I would make a synchronized queue (LinkedBlockingQueue is a good example) of some event objects. Then the timer event would just put an object into the queue, and the processing thread would take() objects from the queue and do the processing when the next object is available (take() waits for it automatically).

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