Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to add new functionality to an existing library. I would need to add new data to a class hierarchy so that the root class would have accessors for it. Anyone should be able to get this data only sub-classes could set it (i.e. public getter and protected setter).

To maintain backward compatibility, I know I must not do any of the following (list only includes actions relevant to my problem):

  • Add or remove virtual functions
  • Add or remove member variables
  • Change type of existing member variable
  • Change signature of existing function

I can think of two ways to add this data to hierarchy: adding a new member variable to root class or adding pure virtual accessor functions (so that data could be stored in sub-classes). However, to maintain backward compatilibity I can not do either of these.

The library is using extensively pimpl idiom but unfortunately the root class I have to modify does not use this idiom. Sub-classes, however, use this idiom.

Now only solution that I can think of is simulating member variable with static hash-map. So I could create a static hash-map, store this new member to it, and implement static accessors for it. Something like this (in pseudo c++):

class NewData {...};

class BaseClass
{
protected:
    static setNewData(BaseClass* instance, NewData* data)
    {
        m_mapNewData[instance] = data;
    }

    static NewData* getNewData(BaseClass* instance)
    {
        return m_mapNewData[instance];
    }
private:
    static HashMap<BaseClass*, NewData*> m_mapNewData;      
};

class DerivedClass : public BaseClass
{
    void doSomething()
    {
        BaseClass::setNewData(this, new NewData());
    }
};

class Outside
{
   void doActions(BaseClass* action)
   {
       NewData* data = BaseClass::getNewData(action);
       ...
   }
};

Now, while this solution might work, I find it very ugly (of course I could also add non-static accessor functions but this wouldn't remove the ugliness).

Are there any other solutions?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
2  
Using gcc adding new virtual members (after the existing ones) maintains backward compatibility. Be aware that it is, of course, compiler specific and I don't know if it would work for other compilers. –  Matthieu M. Dec 16 '10 at 11:01
1  
The problem with static members is that they will make any method that accesses them non-reentrant. If thread safety is of no concern here, though, it would be okay. Otherwise your solution is the best one I can think of. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 11:17
1  
@user544511: thinking about it a bit more, I would advise you to trash the binary compatibility. If people download a new version with new functionality, they should expect to recompile their code. Just make it clear in the version number (to avoid unwanted linkage). As long as you maintain source code compatibility, it's just a matter of recompiling, with no manual intervention. Boost does it all the time, and it's one of the most widely deployed libraries I think :) –  Matthieu M. Dec 16 '10 at 11:44
1  
Well my point is that they won't be reentrant any more if you use that approach because even for different instances of the class they would access the shared HashMap. Unless you want to synchronize all access to it, but that would be prohibitively slow I think. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 11:49
1  
Does the root class have any private data at all? Even if it doesn't use the pimpl idiom (I'm really surprised that there is such class in Qt), if there is at least one private pointer to some private type, you could hack that type to attach your new data to it. It's incredibly ugly, but may actually work. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 12:14
show 8 more comments

6 Answers 6

You could use the decorator pattern. The decorator could expose the new data-elements, and no change to the existing classes would be needed. This works best if clients obtain their objects through factories, because then you can transparently add the decorators.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Space_C0wb0y: you lost me, how would that be different to adding new virtual methods to the root class ? –  Matthieu M. Dec 16 '10 at 11:02
    
@Matthieu: Existing code could continue to use the original classes directly, while new code could use the decorated classes. This has some limitations, so the applicability depends on the existing code-base and use case. –  Björn Pollex Dec 16 '10 at 11:09
    
@SpaceC0wb0y: Ah got it thanks! Extremely portable solution :) –  Matthieu M. Dec 16 '10 at 11:40
    
This might be a good solution but if I understood it correctly, existing sub-classes wouldn't get the new functionality since they are derived from non-decorated base class? –  user544511 Dec 16 '10 at 12:16
1  
@user: That is correct. –  Björn Pollex Dec 16 '10 at 12:22
show 3 more comments

Finally, check binary compatibility using automated tools like abi-compliance-checker.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can add exported functions (declspec import/export) without affecting binary compatibility (ensuring you do not remove any current functions and add your new functions at the end), but you cannot increase the size of the class by adding new data members.

The reason you cannot increase the size of the class is that for someone that compiled using the old size but uses the newly extended class would mean that the data member stored after your class in their object (and more if you add more than 1 word) would get trashed by the end of the new class.

e.g.

Old:

class CounterEngine {
public:
    __declspec(dllexport) int getTotal();
private:
    int iTotal; //4 bytes
};

New:

class CounterEngine {
    public:
        __declspec(dllexport) int getTotal();
        __declspec(dllexport) int getMean();
    private:
        int iTotal; //4 bytes
        int iMean;  //4 bytes
    };

A client then may have:

class ClientOfCounter {
public:
    ...
private:
    CounterEngine iCounter;
    int iBlah;  
};  

In memory, ClientOfCounter in the old framework will look something like this:

ClientOfCounter: iCounter[offset 0],
                 iBlah[offset 4 bytes]

That same code (not recompiled but using your new version would look like this)

ClientOfCounter: iCounter[offset 0],
                 iBlah[offset 4 bytes]  

i.e. it doesn't know that iCounter is now 8 bytes rather than 4 bytes, so iBlah is actually trashed by the last 4 bytes of iCounter.

If you have a spare private data member, you can add a Body class to store any future data members.

class CounterEngine {
public:
    __declspec(dllexport) int getTotal();
private:
    int iTotal; //4 bytes
    void* iSpare; //future
};

  class CounterEngineBody {
    private:
        int iMean; //4 bytes
        void* iSpare[4]; //save space for future
    };


   class CounterEngine {
    public:
        __declspec(dllexport) int getTotal();
        __declspec(dllexport) int getMean() { return iBody->iMean; }
    private:
        int iTotal; //4 bytes
        CounterEngineBody* iBody; //now used to extend class with 'body' object
    };
share|improve this answer
add comment

If your library is open-source then you can request to load it for free to the Upstream Tracker. It will automatically check all your future and old releases (+ current version from your SCM if available) for backward compatibility. So you can easily control your experiments with API.

EDIT: Qt4 library is at upstream-tracker.org/versions/qt4.html

share|improve this answer
    
Qt is surely OSS, but I believe Nokia is cool enough to have their own powerful testing. –  Sergey Tachenov Jan 10 '11 at 14:20
    
Why do you think the author is talking about Qt? –  aponomarenko Jan 10 '11 at 16:32
    
I mentioned it in comments, that's why I guess :). –  user544511 Jan 24 '11 at 7:05
add comment

It is hard to maintain binary compatibility - it is much easier to maintain only interface compatibility.

I think that the only reasonable solution is to break supporting current library and redesign it to only export pure virtual interfaces for classes.

  • That interfaces could never be modified in the future, but you can add new interfaces.
  • In that interfaces you could only use primitive types like pointers and specified size integers or floats. You should not have interfaces with for example std::strings or other non-primitive types.
  • When returning pointers to data allocated in DLL, you need to provide a virtual method for deallocation, so that the application deallocates the data using DLL's delete.
share|improve this answer
    
This is true but something we can not do, unfortunately :(. We really want to add new functionality to this (open-source) library and still maintain binary compatilibity so that others can use it without problems. –  user544511 Dec 16 '10 at 10:57
add comment

Adding data members to the root will break binary compatibility (and force a rebuild, if that is your concern), but it won't break backward compatibility and neither will adding member functions (virtual or not). Adding new member functions is the obvious way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not true. All dependent code will have to be recompiled. That may not be possible when this is a DLL and external apps depend on it. –  Juraj Blaho Dec 16 '10 at 10:31
    
@Juraj Which bit of "and force a rebuild" did you not understand? –  unquiet mind Dec 16 '10 at 10:44
    
Juraj is right, the problem is that I'm trying to modify shared library which is used by many other apps that we cannot rebuild. –  user544511 Dec 16 '10 at 10:46
    
@unquiet mind: The part with "it won't break backward compatibility". I have possibly misunderstood that. –  Juraj Blaho Dec 16 '10 at 10:49
    
@Juraj, @unquiet: I think the correct term is "source compatibility" (to contrast with "binary compatibility"); the "opposite" of backward compatibility (compatible with previous versions), is forward compatibility (compatible with future versions). –  lijie Dec 17 '10 at 5:16
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.