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Another way to ask the same question is, given 2 classes A and B, is it synonymous to say: "Object A can be cast into B" and "Object A is a descendant of B"?

Thanks,

JDelage

Edit: Clarified the question to make it clearer that both A and B are classes.

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Try it and see? –  Ben James Dec 16 '10 at 10:09
    
What do you mean by "direct descendant"? If you mean that class A explicitly extends B, then it isn't necessary. A could extend C and C could extend B, and it would still be possible to cast A to B. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 10:12
    
@Sergey - Yes, that's what I mean by direct descendant. –  JDelage Dec 16 '10 at 10:14
    
Then replace "direct descendant" with "descendant" and your sentence will be correct. It doesn't matter how far up the inheritance tree you cast. –  Sergey Tachenov Dec 16 '10 at 11:22
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"Java - Can you cast an object into a class it doesn't extend?" - No, you can't.

"Basically, is it synonymous to say: "Object A can be cast into B" and "Object A is a direct descendant of B"?" - Yes. Plus in the case when A is of a class implementing interface B.

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Great, thank you. –  JDelage Dec 16 '10 at 10:18
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No, you can't. It throws a ClassCastException.

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If it is not direct descendant or not the implementation of interface

class A;
class B extends A;
A a = new B(); 

interface A;
class B implements A;
(A) B

In other situation

It will throw ClassCastException http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/ClassCastException.html

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Yes you can, if B is interface and A is implementation of B

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Fair enough - I meant B as a separate class, but my question didn't specify it. Devil, details, and all that... Thanks for the lesson. –  JDelage Dec 16 '10 at 10:16
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Suppose you have:

interface I {}
class A implements I {}
class B extends A {}
class C extends B {}

all of the following are valid:

(I)C;
(A)C;
(B)C;
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