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I am writing a metaclass that reads class attributes and store them in a list, but I want the list (cls.columns) to respect the declaration order (that is : mycol2,mycol3,zut,cool,menfin,a in my exemple):

import inspect
class Column(object):
    pass
class ListingMeta(type):
    def __new__(meta, classname, bases, classDict):
        cls = type.__new__(meta, classname, bases, classDict)
        cls.columns = inspect.getmembers(cls,lambda o:isinstance(o,Column)) 
        cls.nb_columns = len(cls.columns)
        return cls

class Listing(object):
    __metaclass__ = ListingMeta
    mycol2 = Column()
    mycol3 = Column()
    zut = Column()
    cool = Column()
    menfin = Column()
    a = Column()


print Listing.columns

Result :

[('a', <__main__.Column object at 0xb7449d2c>), ('cool', <__main__.Column object at 0xb7449aac>), ('menfin', <__main__.Column object at 0xb7449a8c>), ('mycol2', <__main__.Column object at 0xb73a3b4c>), ('mycol3', <__main__.Column object at 0xb744914c>), ('zut', <__main__.Column object at 0xb74490cc>)]

This does not respect the declaration order of Column() attributes for Listing class. if I use classDict directly, it does not help neither : How can I proceed ?

share|improve this question
3  
I don't think you can get them in order without some sort of source-level analysis. In any case, the order is supposed to be mostly irrelevant. The dict hashes by key, which is why you're not seeing it in order –  Robert Dec 16 '10 at 10:13
    
At all, a very constructive question. thanks –  pylover Dec 11 '14 at 3:58
    
you can take a look on tosca widget 2, to find how to do that –  pylover Dec 11 '14 at 4:04

5 Answers 5

Here is the workaround I juste developped :

import inspect

class Column(object):
    creation_counter = 0
    def __init__(self):
        self.creation_order = Column.creation_counter
        Column.creation_counter+=1

class ListingMeta(type):
    def __new__(meta, classname, bases, classDict):
        cls = type.__new__(meta, classname, bases, classDict)
        cls.columns = sorted(inspect.getmembers(cls,lambda o:isinstance(o,Column)),key=lambda i:i[1].creation_order) 
        cls.nb_columns = len(cls.columns)
        return cls

class Listing(object):
    __metaclass__ = ListingMeta
    mycol2 = Column()
    mycol3 = Column()
    zut = Column()
    cool = Column()
    menfin = Column()
    a = Column()


for colname,col in Listing.columns:
    print colname,'=>',col.creation_order
share|improve this answer
    
First I thought "You must reset the creation_counter after each class", and then I realized that you don't at all, assuming you only care about the internal order. It actually works. :) –  Lennart Regebro Dec 16 '10 at 11:14
    
How it working in parallel threads ? i think this code is not threadsafe. –  pylover Dec 11 '14 at 3:56

If you are using Python 2.x then you'll need a hack such as the one Lennart proposes. If you are using Python 3.x then read PEP 3115 as that contains an example which does what you want. Just modify the example to only look at your Column() instances:

 # The custom dictionary
 class member_table(dict):
    def __init__(self):
       self.member_names = []

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
       # if the key is not already defined, add to the
       # list of keys.
       if key not in self:
          self.member_names.append(key)

       # Call superclass
       dict.__setitem__(self, key, value)

 # The metaclass
 class OrderedClass(type):

     # The prepare function
     @classmethod
     def __prepare__(metacls, name, bases): # No keywords in this case
        return member_table()

     # The metaclass invocation
     def __new__(cls, name, bases, classdict):
        # Note that we replace the classdict with a regular
        # dict before passing it to the superclass, so that we
        # don't continue to record member names after the class
        # has been created.
        result = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dict(classdict))
        result.member_names = classdict.member_names
        return result

 class MyClass(metaclass=OrderedClass):
    # method1 goes in array element 0
    def method1(self):
       pass

    # method2 goes in array element 1
    def method2(self):
       pass
share|improve this answer

Well, it's possible, but I wouldn't recommend it.

import inspect
import sys

class Column(object):

    def __init__(self):
        # This is the magic part:
        f_locals = sys._getframe(1).f_locals
        self._order = len([v for v in f_locals.itervalues() 
                           f isinstance(v, Column)])

class ListingMeta(type):
    def __new__(meta, classname, bases, classDict):
        cls = type.__new__(meta, classname, bases, classDict)
        cls.columns = inspect.getmembers(cls,lambda o:isinstance(o,Column)) 
        cls.nb_columns = len(cls.columns)
        return cls

class Listing(object):
    __metaclass__ = ListingMeta
    mycol2 = Column()
    mycol3 = Column()
    zut = Column()
    cool = Column()
    menfin = Column()
    a = Column()

    def columns_in_order(self):
        return sorted(self.columns, key=lambda x: x[1]._order)

l = Listing()
print l.columns_in_order()

I have to ask "Why?" and recommend that you pass in both the column name and the order as parameters to Column(). This hack will bite you sooner or later, if in no other way then by making other people confused. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
The best solution is as you told. passing the order argument to column. this way is pythonic. i am developing a widget library now. so your answer is very useful –  pylover Dec 11 '14 at 4:00

In Python 3, just use an OrderedDict and store its .keys() before passing the whole dict to type.__new__(), like this:

import collections 

class OrderedClassMembers(type):
    @classmethod
    def __prepare__(self, name, bases):
        return collections.OrderedDict()

    def __new__(self, name, bases, classdict):
        classdict['__ordered__'] = [key for key in classdict.keys()
                if key not in ('__module__', '__qualname__')]
        return type.__new__(self, name, bases, classdict)

class Something(metaclass=OrderedClassMembers):
    A_CONSTANT = 1

    def first(self):
        ...

    def second(self):
        ...

print(Something.__ordered__)
# ['A_CONSTANT', 'first', 'second']
share|improve this answer

I guess you should be able to make a class where you replace its __dict__ with an ordered-dict

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea. have you tested it ? –  pylover Dec 11 '14 at 3:56

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