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There exists one very good linear interpolation method. It performs linear interpolation requiring at most one multiply per output sample. I found its description in a third edition of Understanding DSP by Lyons. This method involves a special hold buffer. Given a number of samples to be inserted between any two input samples, it produces output points using linear interpolation. Here, I have rewritten this algorithm using Python:

temp1, temp2 = 0, 0
iL = 1.0 / L
for i in x:
   hold = [i-temp1] * L
   temp1 = i
   for j in hold:
      temp2 += j
      y.append(temp2 *iL)

where x contains input samples, L is a number of points to be inserted, y will contain output samples.

My question is how to implement such algorithm in ANSI C in a most effective way, e.g. is it possible to avoid the second loop?

NOTE: presented Python code is just to understand how this algorithm works.

UPDATE: here is an example how it works in Python:

x=[]
y=[]
hold=[]
num_points=20
points_inbetween = 2

temp1,temp2=0,0

for i in range(num_points):
   x.append( sin(i*2.0*pi * 0.1) )

L = points_inbetween
iL = 1.0/L
for i in x:
   hold = [i-temp1] * L
   temp1 = i
   for j in hold:
      temp2 += j
      y.append(temp2 * iL)

Let's say x=[.... 10, 20, 30 ....]. Then, if L=1, it will produce [... 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 ...]

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1  
If you just want to implement it in C for performance, but still use it from Python, I recommend Cython. –  Björn Pollex Dec 16 '10 at 10:52
    
presented Python code is just to understand how this algorithm works –  psihodelia Dec 16 '10 at 10:57
1  
It's easier to understand how an algorithm works if you use meaningful variable names. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 16 '10 at 11:07
    
@Lennart: Have updated. Now should be easy to understand –  psihodelia Dec 16 '10 at 11:32
1  
Is there an online reference to the algorithm? Also, avoiding multiplications sounds like an optimization of the '80-ies... –  user180326 Dec 26 '10 at 16:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
+25

Interpolation in the sense of "signal sample rate increase"

... or i call it, "upsampling" (wrong term, probably. disclaimer: i have not read Lyons'). I just had to understand what the code does and then re-write it for readability. As given it has couple of problems:

a) it is inefficient - two loops is ok but it does multiplication for every single output item; also it uses intermediary lists(hold), generates result with append (small beer)

b) it interpolates wrong the first interval; it generates fake data in front of the first element. Say we have multiplier=5 and seq=[20,30] - it will generate [0,4,8,12,16,20,22,24,28,30] instead of [20,22,24,26,28,30].

So here is the algorithm in form of a generator:

def upsampler(seq, multiplier):
    if seq:
        step = 1.0 / multiplier
        y0 = seq[0];
        yield y0
        for y in seq[1:]:
            dY = (y-y0) * step
            for i in range(multiplier-1):
                y0 += dY;
                yield y0
            y0 = y;
            yield y0

Ok and now for some tests:

>>> list(upsampler([], 3))  # this is just the same as [Y for Y in upsampler([], 3)]
[]
>>> list(upsampler([1], 3))
[1]
>>> list(upsampler([1,2], 3))
[1, 1.3333333333333333, 1.6666666666666665, 2]
>>> from math import sin, pi
>>> seq = [sin(2.0*pi * i/10) for i in range(20)]
>>> seq
[0.0, 0.58778525229247314, 0.95105651629515353, 0.95105651629515364, 0.58778525229247325, 1.2246063538223773e-016, -0.58778525229247303, -0.95105651629515353, -0.95105651629515364, -0.58778525229247336, -2.4492127076447545e-016, 0.58778525229247214, 0.95105651629515353, 0.95105651629515364, 0.58778525229247336, 3.6738190614671318e-016, -0.5877852522924728, -0.95105651629515342, -0.95105651629515375, -0.58778525229247347]
>>> list(upsampler(seq, 2))
[0.0, 0.29389262614623657, 0.58778525229247314, 0.76942088429381328, 0.95105651629515353, 0.95105651629515364, 0.95105651629515364, 0.7694208842938135, 0.58778525229247325, 0.29389262614623668, 1.2246063538223773e-016, -0.29389262614623646, -0.58778525229247303, -0.76942088429381328, -0.95105651629515353, -0.95105651629515364, -0.95105651629515364, -0.7694208842938135, -0.58778525229247336, -0.29389262614623679, -2.4492127076447545e-016, 0.29389262614623596, 0.58778525229247214, 0.76942088429381283, 0.95105651629515353, 0.95105651629515364, 0.95105651629515364, 0.7694208842938135, 0.58778525229247336, 0.29389262614623685, 3.6738190614671318e-016, -0.29389262614623618, -0.5877852522924728, -0.76942088429381306, -0.95105651629515342, -0.95105651629515364, -0.95105651629515375, -0.76942088429381361, -0.58778525229247347]

And here is my translation to C, fit into Kratz's fn template:

/**
 *
 * @param src caller supplied array with data
 * @param src_len len of src
 * @param steps to interpolate
 * @param dst output param will be filled with (src_len - 1) * steps + 1 samples
 */
float* linearInterpolation(float* src, int src_len, int steps, float* dst)
{
    float step, y0, dy;
    float *src_end;
    if (src_len > 0) {
        step = 1.0 / steps;
        for (src_end = src+src_len; *dst++ = y0 = *src++, src < src_end; ) {
            dY = (*src - y0) * step;
            for (int i=steps; i>0; i--) {
                *dst++ = y0 += dY;
            }
        }
    }
}

Please note the C snippet is "typed but never compiled or run", so there might be syntax errors, off-by-1 errors etc. But overall the idea is there.

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oh bummer, the bounty expired and only 1/2 got awarded. the other 25pts - phewt! - vanished from the stackoverflow realm. –  Nas Banov Dec 29 '10 at 23:12

In that case I think you can avoid the second loop:

def interpolate2(x, L):
    new_list = []
    new_len = (len(x) - 1) * (L + 1)
    for i in range(0, new_len):
        step = i / (L + 1)
        substep = i % (L + 1)
        fr = x[step]
        to = x[step + 1]
        dy = float(to - fr) / float(L + 1)
        y = fr + (dy * substep)
        new_list.append(y)
    new_list.append(x[-1])
    return new_list

print interpolate2([10, 20, 30], 3)

you just calculate the member in the position you want directly. Though - that might not be the most efficient to do it. The only way to be sure is to compile it and see which one is faster.

share|improve this answer
    
No, you have copy-pasted a wrong sentence. I've spoken about what hold buffer makes. The complete algorithm produces linear-interpolation, not just repeating items. Please see my updated question. –  psihodelia Dec 16 '10 at 11:35
    
Yeah, the number of calculations are not smaller this way. Looping in itself does not take significant time, so there is no need in avoiding it. Still, it should work. +1 for showing alternate (if useless) solutions. ;) –  Lennart Regebro Dec 16 '10 at 13:04

Well, first of all, your code is broken. L is not defined, and neither is y or x.

Once that is fixed, I run cython on the resulting code:

L = 1
temp1, temp2 = 0, 0
iL = 1.0 / L
y = []
x = range(5)
for i in x:
   hold = [i-temp1] * L
   temp1 = i
   for j in hold:
      temp2 += j
      y.append(temp2 *iL)

And that seemed to work. I haven't tried to compile it, though, and you can also improve the speed a lot by adding different optimizations.

"e.g. is it possible to avoid the second loop?"

If it is, then it's possible in Python too. And I don't see how, although I don't see why you would do it the way you do. First creating a list of L length of i-temp is completely pointless. Just loop L times:

L = 1
temp1, temp2 = 0, 0
iL = 1.0 / L
y = []
x = range(5)
for i in x:
   hold = i-temp1
   temp1 = i
   for j in range(L):
      temp2 += hold
      y.append(temp2 *iL)

It all seems overcomplicated for what you get out though. What are you trying to do, actually? Interpolate something? (Duh it says so in the title. Sorry about that.)

There are surely easier ways of interpolating.

Update, a much simplified interpolation function:

# A simple list, so it's easy to see that you interpolate.
indata = [float(x) for x in range(0, 110, 10)]
points_inbetween = 3

outdata = [indata[0]]

for point in indata[1:]: # All except the first
    step = (point - outdata[-1]) / (points_inbetween + 1)
    for i in range(points_inbetween):
        outdata.append(outdata[-1] + step)

I don't see a way to get rid of the inner loop, nor a reason for wanting to do so. Converting it to C I'll leave up to someone else, or even better, Cython, as C is a great langauge of you want to talk to hardware, but otherwise just needlessly difficult.

share|improve this answer
    
@psihodelia: But i-temp1 does not make a list, so it will not be [10, 20, 10]. [i-temp1] will always be a list of one value only. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 16 '10 at 11:12
    
@Lennart, * L will cause the list to repeat. [1]*2 is [1,1]. But yeah, I noticed the same thing, the repeated list doesn't really help express the algorithm. –  mtrw Dec 16 '10 at 11:15
    
@mtrw: Yes. I know. –  Lennart Regebro Dec 16 '10 at 11:18
    
@Lennart - I misunderstood your previous comment, I didn't realize you and I were pointing out the same thing. Sorry. –  mtrw Dec 16 '10 at 11:18
    
@mtrw: No problem. :) –  Lennart Regebro Dec 16 '10 at 11:20

I think you need the two loops. You have to step over the samples in x to initialize the interpolator, not to mention copy their values into y, and you have to step over the output samples to fill in their values. I suppose you could do one loop to copy x into the appropriate places in y, followed by another loop to use all the values from y, but that will still require some stepping logic. Better to use the nested loop approach.

(And, as Lennart Regebro points out) As a side note, I don't see why you do hold = [i-temp1] * L. Instead, why not do hold = i-temp, and then loop for j in xrange(L): and temp2 += hold? This will use less memory but otherwise behave exactly the same.

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Please don't pay big attention to Python code. I've just written it based on a visual LTI system diagram. It's only to understand how it does work. Yes, there is no need to use buffer in the code, but buffers are easy to place on the diagram. –  psihodelia Dec 16 '10 at 11:43

Heres my try at a C implementation for your algorithm. Before trying to further optimize it id suggest you profile its performance with all compiler optimizations enabled.

/**
 *
 * @param src caller supplied array with data
 * @param src_len len of src
 * @param steps to interpolate
 * @param dst output param needs to be of size src_len * steps
 */
float* linearInterpolation(float* src, size_t src_len, size_t steps, float* dst)
{
  float* dst_ptr = dst;
  float* src_ptr = src;
  float stepIncrement = 1.0f / steps;
  float temp1 = 0.0f;
  float temp2 = 0.0f;
  float hold;
  size_t idx_src, idx_steps;
  for(idx_src = 0; idx_src < src_len; ++idx_src)
  {
    hold = *src_ptr - temp1;
    temp1 = *src_ptr;
    ++src_ptr;
    for(idx_steps = 0; idx_steps < steps; ++idx_steps)
    {
      temp2 += hold;
      *dst_ptr = temp2 * stepIncrement;
      ++dst_ptr;
    }
  }
}
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