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I have a DAO class with many methods that have a lot of repeated code along the lines of: -

public void method1(...) {
  Connection conn = null;
  try {
      //custom code here
  } catch (SQLException e) {
     LOG.error("Error accessing the database.", e);
     throw new DatabaseException();
  } catch (QueryNotFoundException e) {
     LOG.error("Error accessing the database.", e);
     throw new DatabaseException();
  } finally {
     if (conn != null)
        connectionPool.returnConnection(conn);
  } 

public void method2(...) {
  Connection conn = null;
  try {
      //different custom code here
  } catch (SQLException e) {
     LOG.error("Error accessing the database.", e);
     throw new DatabaseException();
  } catch (QueryNotFoundException e) {
     LOG.error("Error accessing the database.", e);
     throw new DatabaseException();
  } finally {
     if (conn != null)
        connectionPool.returnConnection(conn);
  } 

I would like to restructure this class to put the try, catch, finally in one place to avoid repetation. How would I accomplish this?

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create an interface for ex. Executable:

 public interface Executable() {

   void exec() throws SqlException();

 }

Refactor each of your dao method to :

public void method1() {
   execute(new Executable() {

     @Override
     public void exec() throws SqlException() {
          // your code here
     }
  });
  } 

Create the following method execute in your DAO:

private void execute(Executor ex) {
    try {
      ex.exec();
    } catch(...) {
      ...
    } finally {
       ...
    }
}
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Yup, that's the next pattern I was going to suggest if JdbcTemplate is not an option (+1) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Dec 16 '10 at 11:06
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I think what you should use is Spring-JDBC's JdbcTemplate

Even if you don't use spring to manage your application, you could programmatically use JdbcTemplate to abstract away all the connection management and error handling.

Example code:

List<Actor> actors = this.jdbcTemplate.query(
        "select first_name, last_name from t_actor",
        new RowMapper<Actor>() {
            public Actor mapRow(ResultSet rs, int rowNum)
            throws SQLException {
                Actor actor = new Actor();
                actor.setFirstName(rs.getString("first_name"));
                actor.setLastName(rs.getString("last_name"));
                return actor;
            }
        });

As you can see, you deal with the actual query only, not with the infrastructure stuff around it.

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I would use AOP for a commong logging pattern here. For example:-

<bean id="exceptionLogger" class="my.good.ExceptionLogger" />  
    <aop:config>
            <aop:pointcut id="allDaoMethods" expression="execution(* my.dao.*(..))" />
            <aop:aspect id="daoLogger" ref="exceptionLogger">
                <aop:after-throwing pointcut-ref="allDaoMethods"
                                    method="logIt"
                                    throwing="e"/>
            </aop:aspect>  
    </aop:config>

And the ExceptionLogger class could be something like below:-

public class ExceptionLogger {
    private static Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(ExceptionLogger.class);
    public void logIt(JoinPoint jp, Exception e) {
        StringBuilder msg = new StringBuilder();
        msg.append("<whatever makes sense>");
        logger.error(msg.toString());
    }
}
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it is interesting for me. Can you explain more ? I am in the same situation –  user467871 Dec 16 '10 at 11:02
    
What part would you like me to explain more? You can read up about AOP on the link that I have provided. I also gave example of the aop config and a sample exception class. –  CoolBeans Dec 16 '10 at 11:06
    
This is also a spring-based solution. read this chapter: static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/… (it's difficult reading, but it's worth the effort), also read AspectJ in Action (2nd ed): manning.com/laddad2 it provides in-depth coverage of AOP with or without Spring –  Sean Patrick Floyd Dec 16 '10 at 11:09
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This is similiar to Vladimirs solution without anonymous classes with possibility to return value from such methods.

interface DaoOperation {
    void execute() throws SQLException;
}

class Operation1 implements DaoOperation {

    public void execute() {
        // former method1
    }
}

// in case you'd ever like to return value
interface TypedDaoOperation<T> {
    T execute() throws SQLException;
}

class Operation2 implements TypedDaoOperation<String> {
    public String execute() {
        return "something";
    }
}

class DaoOperationExecutor {
    public void execute(DaoOperation o) {
        try {
            o.execute();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            // handle it as you want
        }
    }

    public <T>T execute(TypedDaoOperation<T> o) {
        try {
            return o.execute();
        } catch (SQLException e) {
            // handle it as you want
        }
    }
}
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