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How can I create two classes that have member pointers to each other's class type, with full access to each other's data? In other words, I need two classes like this:

class A
{
protected:
   B *p;
};

class B
{
protected:
   A *p;
};

I'm having trouble with it because I'm not up to par with C++ conventions, and obviously, class A can't declare a class B because B is declared later in the code.

Thanks for the help

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2  
c++ is a place where friends have access to your private members. Had to mention it here :P –  jrharshath Dec 16 '10 at 12:40
2  
Of course the question is: if you have two classes that are so heavily coupled together then are you sure your design is correct? Certainly sounds like you have a class boundary wrong somewhere. –  GrahamS Dec 16 '10 at 13:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should use forward class declaration.

//in A.h

    class B; // forward declaration
    class A
    {
    protected:
       B *p;
       friend class B; // forward declaration
    };

//in B.h
class A; // forward declaration
class B
{
protected:
   A *p;
   friend class A; // forward declaration
};
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you must use forward declaration like:

class B;
class A{
   ...
   friend class B;
};
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Thanks... What about the friendship? –  oldSkool Dec 16 '10 at 12:23
    
friend class B; –  kinnou02 Dec 16 '10 at 12:25
class A
{
protected:
   class B *p;
};

If you want to declare friendship, you need a forward declaration:

class B;

class A
{
friend class B;
protected:
   B *p;
};
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Not worth a downvote IMO, but you don't actually need a separate forward declaration in your second example. You could do friend class B and also class B *p, and leave out the first class B;. –  Steve Jessop Dec 16 '10 at 12:36
    
@Steve Yes, you are right. Don't know what I was thinking there. –  unquiet mind Dec 16 '10 at 12:40
class B;
class A
{
protected:
   B *p;
   friend class B;
};

class B
{
protected:
   A *p;
   friend class A;
};
share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thanks :) –  oldSkool Dec 16 '10 at 12:23
    
Will this code allow class A to use inline functions that were declared in class B? –  oldSkool Dec 16 '10 at 12:25
    
@old-school rules: inline is completely unrelated to whether functions are accessible or not. –  Steve Jessop Dec 16 '10 at 12:26
    
@Old-school rules: Yes, of course. Inline has nothing to do with friendship –  Armen Tsirunyan Dec 16 '10 at 12:27

You could use a forward declaration by doing class B; above class A

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simple use: class B;

class A
{
    protected:
       B *p;
       friend class B;
};

class B
{
    protected:
       A *p;
       friend class A;
};

Using class B; means a forward declaration and this basically tells the compiler: "class B exists somewhere".

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class B;
class A {
    friend class B;
  protected:
    B *p;
};

class B {
    friend class A;
  protected:
    A *p;
};

Note that any member functions of A which actually use the members of B will have to be defined after the definition of B, for example:

class B;
class A {
    friend class B;
  protected:
    B *p;
    A *getBA();
};

class B {
    friend class A;
  protected:
    A *p;
};

A *A::getBA() { return p->p; }
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