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I have some internet traffic data to analyze. I need to analyze only those packets that are within a certain IP range. So, I need to write a if statement. I suppose I need a regular expression for the test condition. My knowledge of regexp is a little weak. Can someone tell me how would I construct a regular expression for that condition. An example range may be like

Group A
56.286.75.0/19 
57.256.106.0/21 
64.131.14.0/22 

Group B
58.176.44.0/21 
58.177.92.0/19 

The if statement would be like

if("IP in A" || "IP in B") {
        do something
}

else { do something else }

so i would need to make the equivalent regexp for "IP in A" and "IP in B" conditions.

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3  
Why the hell do you want to use regex for checking something defined on bits level? –  x13n Dec 16 '10 at 13:49
    
@x13n well thats just an initial thought and one of the reasons I posted here to get any better ideas. i didn't get what u mean by "defined on bits level" though. –  sfactor Dec 16 '10 at 14:03
    
Network mask (the /<number> part in each of your address) tells how many bits from the left in address should be compared to tell whether an address belongs to some subnet. It would be rather hard to write a regular expression for this. –  x13n Dec 16 '10 at 14:10
    
@x13n oh ok got it now, i've got one suggestion that looks like a better way to test this so doing that. thanks. –  sfactor Dec 16 '10 at 14:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I don't think that regexps provide much advantage for this problem.

Instead, use the Net::Netmask module. The "match" method should do what you want.

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Thanks, I will give this a try. –  sfactor Dec 16 '10 at 14:07

I have to echo the disagreement with using a regex to check IP addresses...however, here is a way to pull IPs out of text:

qr{
  (?<!\d)             # No digit having come immediately before
  (?: [1-9] \d?       # any one or two-digit number
  |   1 \d \d         # OR any three-digit number starting with 1
  |   2 (?: [0-4] \d  # OR 200 - 249
        |   5 [0-6]   # OR 250 - 256
        )
  )
  (?: \.                 # followed by a dot
      (?: [1-9] \d?      # 1-256 reprise...
      |   1 \d \d 
      |   2 (?: [0-4 \d
            |   5 [0-6]
            )
      )
  ){3}     # that group exactly 3 times
  (?!\d)   # no digit following immediately after         
}x
;

But given that general pattern, we can construct an IP parser. But for the given "ranges", I wouldn't do anything less than the following:

A => qr{
  (?<! \d )
  (?: 56\.186\. 75
  |   57\.256\.106
  |   64\.131\. 14
  )
  \.
  (?: [1-9] \d?
  |   1 \d \d
  |   2 (?: [0-4] \d
        |   5 [0-6]
        )
  )
  (?! \d )
  }x

B => qr{
  (?<! \d )
  58 \.
  (?: 176\.44
  |   177\.92
  )
  \.
  (?: [1-9] \d?
  |   1 \d \d
  |   2 (?: [0-4] \d
        |   5 [0-6]
        )
  )
  (?! \d )
  }x
share|improve this answer
    
The prefix length (number after the '/') tells you how many bits make up the network part of the address which is the only part you should be matching. Here you're just matching the first 3 octets which assumes everything is a '/24'. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIDR_notation –  eater Dec 16 '10 at 15:58
    
Although I strongly advise using a netmask module that abstracts away the bits, for those bound and determined to use a regex (which just out of sheer cussedness I sometimes myself am :), this seems like a great place to use a “grammatical” regex, with a ((DEFINE)…) block and “regex subroutines”. –  tchrist Dec 16 '10 at 18:19
1  
This re-invents the wheel - just use Regexp::Common::net. –  Ether Dec 16 '10 at 18:39
    
@tchrist: Agree. @Ether: Whoops. I think it's just all my years of CPAN-less Perl environment that makes me code first. –  Axeman Dec 16 '10 at 19:05

I'm doing something like:

use NetAddr::IP;

my @group_a = map NetAddr::IP->new($_), @group_a_masks;
...
my $addr = NetAddr::IP->new( $ip_addr_in );
if ( grep $_->contains( $addr ), @group_a ) {
    print "group a";
}

I chose NetAddr::IP over Net::Netmask for IPv6 support.

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Martin is right, use Net::Netmask. If you really want to use a regex though...

$prefix = "192.168.1.0/25";
$ip1 = "192.168.1.1";
$ip2 = "192.168.1.129";

$prefix =~ s/([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\/([0-9]+)/$mask=(2**32-1)<<(32-$5); $1<<24|$2<<16|$3<<8|$4/e;
$ip1 =~ s/([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)/$1<<24|$2<<16|$3<<8|$4/e;
$ip2 =~ s/([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)\.([0-9]+)/$1<<24|$2<<16|$3<<8|$4/e;

if (($prefix & $mask) == ($ip1 & $mask)) {
  print "ip1 matches\n";
}
if (($prefix & $mask) == ($ip2 & $mask)) {
  print "ip2 matches\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Whilst clever, it's code like that which gets Perl a bad reputation as being write-only mess akin to line noise :) –  David Precious Dec 16 '10 at 14:31
3  
Agreed. Don't actually do this. –  eater Dec 16 '10 at 14:43
    
[0-9]+ is a poor character class to use for matching IP addresses, given that any given octet can be between 0 and 255 only. Something like [12]?[1-5]?[0-9]\. is better for matching one octet, but still not perfect. And this is why you shouldn't use regexes for matching IPs. :) –  friedo Dec 16 '10 at 15:16
    
Yeah, there are all sorts of gotcahas that make using a good library the right answer. Let someone else figure out how to deal with stuff like this: ping 0300.0250.0xa.0xb –  eater Dec 16 '10 at 15:25
2  
p3rl.org/Regexp::Common::net –  ysth Dec 16 '10 at 17:53

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