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I'm trying to learn and put into practice IoC and how to program against interfaces instead of objects. This is quite hard for me. Here is the code I have so far. Are there any mistakes I made? Point them out to me will help me understand how it actually fits in when put into practice.

Thanks!

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces
{
    interface IDownloader
    {
        void DownloadInformation();
    }
}



using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces;

namespace SharpDIC.Api.Models
{
    public class Member
    {
        /********************************************************************************
        * Some of these attributes aren't even used. The API doesn't provide them yet, *
        * so I'll have to scrape the information from the HTML itself. Still thinking  *
        * about how to tackle this.                                                    *
        *                                                                              *
        * Author:  Sergio Tapia                                                         *
        * Website: http://www.alphaot.com      
        * Date:    16/12/2010
        * ******************************************************************************/

        #region "Attributes"
        public string ID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Rating { get; set; }
        public string Photo { get; set; }
        public string LastActive { get; set; }
        public string Location { get; set; }
        public string Birthday { get; set; }
        public string Age { get; set; }
        public string Gender { get; set; }
        public string Email { get; set; }


        public string Title { get; set; }
        public string Reputation { get; set; }
        public string DreamKudos { get; set; }
        public string Group { get; set; }
        public string Posts { get; set; }
        public string PostsPerDay { get; set; }
        public string MostActiveIn { get; set; }
        public string JoinDate { get; set; }
        public string ProfileViews { get; set; }

        public string FavoriteOs { get; set; }
        public string FavoriteBrowser { get; set; }
        public string FavoriteProcessor { get; set; }
        public string FavoriteConsole { get; set; }

        public List<Visitor> Visitors { get; set; }
        public List<Friend> Friends { get; set; }
        public List<Comment> Comments { get; set; }
        public string ProgrammingLanguages { get; set; }

        public string Aim { get; set; }
        public string Msn { get; set; }
        public string Website { get; set; }
        public string Icq { get; set; }
        public string Yahoo { get; set; }
        public string Jabber { get; set; }
        public string Skype { get; set; }
        public string LinkedIn { get; set; }
        public string Facebook { get; set; }
        public string Twitter { get; set; }
        public string XFire { get; set; }
        #endregion
    }

    public class Comment
    {
        public string ID { get; set; }
        public string Text { get; set; }
        public string Date { get; set; }
        public string Owner { get; set; }
    }

    public class Friend
    {
        public string ID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Url { get; set; }
        public string Photo { get; set; }
    }

    public class Visitor
    {
        public string ID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Url { get; set; }
        public string Photo { get; set; }
        public string TimeOfLastVisit { get; set; }
    }
}



using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Xml.Linq;
using SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces;
using SharpDIC.Api.Models;

namespace SharpDIC.Api
{
    public class Wrapper : IDownloader
    {
        public void DownloadInformation()
        {

        }

        public Member SearchForMember(int memberID)
        {
            XDocument response = GetXmlResponse(memberID);
            //Member then is responsible to parse and fill his contents.
            Member member = new Member(response);
        }
    }
}

What would you change in this code? Am I doing this right?

Edit: Notice that the DownloadInformation() method isn't actually doing anything. My intentions was to have a interface have that method, that way I can get the information either from the xml (for now) but also be able to switch to JSON or whatever the provider might offer in the future.

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1  
I see no IoC in your code. –  VVS Dec 16 '10 at 14:21
    
Thank you, your comment helps me tremendously. /s –  delete Dec 16 '10 at 14:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What is this code going to be doing?

The way I tend to do IoC, my implementations are in a separate assembly from my interfaces. The business logic just references the interfaces and the IoC container (StructureMap is my weapon of choice, but to each his own... you could even do it manually) wires up the implementations.

To contrast that with what you have here so far:

  1. Your implementation is in the same namespace (and I assume assembly) as your interfaces. Other than your own diligence, there's really nothing to stop you from programming against the implementation rather than the interface. So the risk of coupling still exists.
  2. Your implementation has a public method that's not on the interface. Anything which programs against the interface won't be able to see this method. This is fine as the system grows. There's no reason that a single implementation can't implement multiple interfaces. The interface segregation principle allows this, as long as the interfaces themselves are separate and distinct for a reason. But if that method is just an internal part of the implementation, private would make more sense.

The basic idea behind IoC is that a class should be provided with a dependency rather than instantiate one. Right now, it looks like the only things you instantiate are an XDocument and a Member. The former looks like it's just part of the internal implementation for IDownloader which draws the XML dependency out of the domain (interface). (Based on your edit, that's exactly right. You can later create an IDownloader implementation which handles JSON instead of XML and the domain won't know/care the difference.) The latter is just an anemic model, so I see no problem instantiating that.

The real part of IoC will be where you use IDownloader, which doesn't look like it's being used yet.

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Sergio,

a few things that i would change (not so much based on the IoC - more the interface spec):

interface IDownloader<T>
{
    T DownloadInformation();
}

this feels better to me, you can then have that implemented in your concrete class something like:

public class Wrapper : SharpDIC.Api.Interfaces.IDownloader<string>
{
    public Member SearchForMember(int memberID)
    {
        XDocument response = GetXmlResponse(memberID);
        //Member then is responsible to parse and fill his contents.
        Member member = new Member(response);
    }

    public string DownloadInformation()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

obviously, i used 'string' as the type but you could use any type you needed for the implementation. I'd also change List to IList:

public IList<Visitor> Visitors { get; set; }
public IList<Friend> Friends { get; set; }
public IList<Comment> Comments { get; set; }

just makes for better implementation detail (after all, we are discussing interfaces :-))

that's all - David's answer deals with the 'brainy' stuff (nice one David) ...

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Some quick points (not about ioc):

Your member class should be refactored.

Add a IList<IInstantMessanger> instead of all addresses like Msn, Icq etc. Else you need to change your class each time you want to remove or add a IM type (and therefore break the Open/Closed principle)

Move favorites to a separate class and create a IList<>. Same reason.

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About the data types of your entities.

  • try to use other datatypes distinct from string Id -> int, Guid
  • Reputation -> is a numeric value? int, float
  • List -> IList -> use interfaces instead
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