Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Windows Mobile 6.5 (.net cf 3.5) that uses a singleton class which follows this pattern:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    static readonly Singleton instance=new Singleton();

    // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
    // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
    static Singleton()
    {
    }

    Singleton()
    {
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

reference

My class used to collect GPS data from the Intermediate drive. What I want is to create an event on the singleton class that I can subscribe to? E.g. MyClass.Instance.LocationChanged += ...;

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Mark

share|improve this question
    
Be careful, any code that subscribes the event has to explicitly unsubscribe it. Failing to do so causes a memory leak. –  Hans Passant Dec 16 '10 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What's the problem?

public sealed class Singleton
{
  ... your code ...

  public delegate LocationChangedEventHandler(object sender, LocationChangedEventArgs ea);  

  public event LocationChangedEventHandler LocationChanged;

  private void OnLocationChanged(/* args */)
  {
    if (LocationChanged != null)
      LocationChanged(this, new LocationChangedEventArgs(/* args */);
  }
}

public class LocationChangedEventArgs : EventArgs
{
  // TODO: implement
}

Call OnLocationChanged whenever you want to fire the event.

share|improve this answer
    
For further information -- msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/awbftdfh.aspx –  Austin Salonen Dec 16 '10 at 15:06
    
aren't you missing a "void" in front of the delegate? –  SeveSeve Feb 8 '13 at 14:38

You should just be able to do this as you would an event on any class.

public event Action<object, EventArgs> LocationChanged;

you can then have a protected virtual method such as:

protected virtual void OnLocationChanged(EventArgs args)
{
   if(LocationChanged != null)
   {
     LocationChanged(this, args);
   }
}

You can fire off your OnLocationChanged method where ever you need too and the event's you've attached will do their thing.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.