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I've created a class which acts as an all-purpose DataType class. I am doing this because I need to serialize a collection of misc-typed objects to JSON, and I'd like to be able to create the full data set as a collection. Like so:

JSON.Serialize(new []
{
    new Chameleon("aDate", DateTime.Now),
    new Chameleon("aString", "FUBAR")
});

The following is a simplified version of my implementation:

class Chameleon
{
    private String _type;
    private String _key;
    private Object _value;

    public Chameleon(String key, String value)
    {
        _type = "string";
        _key = key;
        _value = value;
    }

    public Chameleon(String key, DateTime value)
    {
        _type = "string";
        _key = key;
        _value = value;
    }

    public new String ToString()
    {
        // returns internal data, formatted data according to _type
    }
}

This is all well and good, but when I try and join - or concatinate if you will - a collection of Chameleon using String.Join(), ToString() on Chameleon objects in the collection are not called by the String.Join() method; instead I get the usual namespace + class-name string returned.

Why is String.Join() not calling my custom ToString() implementation? What am I missing?


Here's what I'm doing:

JSON.Serialize(String.Join<Chameleon>(",", new []
{
    new Chameleon("aDate", DateTime.Now),
    new Chameleon("aString", "FUBAR")
}));
share|improve this question
3  
I haven't tried your example yet, but have you tried creating your ToString method as override rather than as "new"? – wageoghe Dec 16 '10 at 15:02
    
@wageoghe: Aye! It worked. Thanks – roosteronacid Dec 16 '10 at 15:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

My guess is that this occurs because you define ToString as a new method, rather than overriding it. Try this code instead:

public override String ToString()
{
    // returns internal data, formatted data according to _type
}
share|improve this answer
    
Worked! Will accept your answer as soon as I can (5 min. :)) – roosteronacid Dec 16 '10 at 15:06
1  
@roosteronacid, glad it worked for you. I'd generally suggest you avoid using new methods unless you have a good reason to do so. – Drew Noakes Dec 16 '10 at 15:31

That was it. Try defining your ToString like this:

  public override String ToString() //Note the override rather than new
  {
    //Format your string etc.
  }
share|improve this answer

You need to put ToString on each Chameleon object otherwise you have an array of Chameleon object instead of an array of string which should be used.

share|improve this answer
    
Not true in .NET 4: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd992421.aspx – Drew Noakes Dec 16 '10 at 15:06
    
@Drew: You're totally right, and I see you provided the correct answer :). – Tomas Jansson Dec 16 '10 at 15:13

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